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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 19, 2011
At funeral services for Nathan Krasnopoler held at Sol Levinson and Bros. Funeral Home on Aug. 12, the 20-year-old was remembered by a Johns Hopkins University professor for his "keen and incisive intellect. " Mr. Krasnopoler died Aug. 10 at Gilchrist Center in Columbia from a severe irreversible brain injury that he sustained Feb. 20 after being hit by a motorist while riding his bicycle on West University Parkway near the Hopkins Homewood campus. "Nathan was very bright, very creative and very self-motivated," said Edward R. Scheinerman, professor in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, who is also vice dean of engineering education at the Whiting School of Engineering.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Allen Grossman,a prize-winning poet who spent 15 years teaching his craft to students at the Johns Hopkins University, died June 27 at his home in Chelsea, Mass. He was 82 and had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Allen was an inimitable instructor," said Douglas Basford, assistant director of composition at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a former student of Dr. Grossman's at Hopkins. Remembering a class he audited in poetry and poetics, Mr. Basford recalled the instructor "probing and prodding to get, as he did in his critical prose, to the core of how a poem worked [and]
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Clifford L. Culp, a retired fund-raiser for the Johns Hopkins University and a founding member of the Maryland chapter of the National Society of Fundraising Executives, died of lung cancer Friday at his home in Stoneleigh. He was 96. Mr. Culp, a native of Huntsville, Pa., graduated from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania before moving to Baltimore. He worked in business and accounting before joining the Johns Hopkins University in 1952 as its first development professional.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
For Colm Toibin, the world is full of echoes - ancient stories from different traditions that speak of parents, children and the divine. He sensed the reverberations every time he thought of his childhood in County Wexford, Ireland, where he was steeped in biblical stories. He detected them every time before he stood before a class in the New School in New York and prepared to lecture on the ancient Greek tragedies. And he picked up the murmurs once again when he went to the opera or saw his friend, the actress Fiona Shaw, perform the role of Medea on Broadway, and wished there were more epic roles for her to tackle.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
A crowd assembles slowly, like reluctant rabble-rousers on an uncertain mission. But by 4:15 for a 4 o'clock event, Levering Hall teems with students and professors. Late-latecomers chuck backpacks and sprawl along the floor. They await - what exactly? Wisdom? Debate? Release? A literary scholar begins: a brief definition of the word "teach-in." A historian comments: the "narrative of apocalypse" has distracted the public. (A false belief replaces reason, he says: This new era of apocalypse has no connection to the past.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
Marion Buchman, an award-winning Baltimore poet and former lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University, died Tuesday of lung cancer at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Northwest Baltimore. She was 86. A longtime Northwest Baltimore resident who wrote hundreds of poems and won many awards, she was named Poet of the Year by the Maryland Poetry Society in 1965. In 1969, she was awarded the Cheltenham Prize from the Arts Council of Great Britain for "Cenotaph." She also received the John Masefield Award for "Nancy Hanks Lincoln," and, in 1979, the Al Di La Prize from Franklin College, Lugano, Switzerland, for the "Italian Alps."
NEWS
April 20, 2007
Benjamin S. Walker Sr., a retired Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory writer and a baseball fan, died Saturday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda of a subdural hematoma as a result of a fall. The Rockville resident was 77. Mr. Walker was born in Omaha, Neb., and raised in Washington. After earning a bachelor's degree from Auburn University in 1951, he enlisted in the Navy and served for three years aboard the USS John R. Craig, a destroyer, during the Korean War. From 1954 to 1960, he was a technical writer for RCA Services Co., Vitro Laboratories and Washington Engineering Services Co. One of his assignments was writing the technical manual for the USS Boston, the Navy's first guided missile ship.
NEWS
July 31, 1991
Joseph Cooper, a distinguished professor of social sciences at Rice University, is to be the new provost and vice president of academic affairs at Johns Hopkins University.Cooper was appointed Monday by the executive committee of the Johns Hopkins Board of Trustees. His selection was recommended by Hopkins President William Richardson."Dr. Cooper is a distinguished scholar . . . and a seasoned administrator who brings to us a wealth of experience," Richardson said.Cooper, who assumes his new post Sept.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
Milton C. Cummings Jr., an author and nationally recognized expert on the U.S. Congress who taught political science at the Johns Hopkins University for nearly 40 years, died Aug. 10 of prostate cancer at a son's home in New Vernon, N.J. He was 74. "He was one of the great American political science professors of his generation," said Thomas Greene a retired Foreign Service officer and friend since their student days at Swarthmore College. "He had a great feel for American political development and could research issues that have a partisan thrust in neutral terms without taking sides.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,sun reporter | July 7, 2007
As the graduate student walked by a dark sport utility vehicle on her way to the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus, the men inside the vehicle struck up a conversation with her, asking for directions to North Avenue. Then a passenger emerged from the parked SUV in the 100 block of W. 29th St. and tried to force the 29-year-old woman into the back seat. "He grabbed her arm and started to pull her toward the SUV, and threatened her to come with him," said Maj. Michael Pristoop, commander of Baltimore's Northern District.
NEWS
By Bridget Kustin | February 24, 2014
"Freedom of expression is the heartbeat of our university," Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels and Provost Robert C. Lieberman declared in an email this month announcing a new Task Force on Academic Freedom that will formulate an "official set of principles that can give expression to our core values in this area. " The email makes the case for JHU's "special kinship with academic freedom" through one particular example: Philosophy professor Arthur Lovejoy's disagreement with a trustee while at Stanford had earned him a "troublemaker" reputation, but JHU hired him anyway.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A 23-year-old man and three juveniles were arrested Friday night and charged with robbing a man near Johns Hopkins University after trying to rob two women 20 minutes earlier, court records show.  Police wrote in charging documents that a 23-year-old man called police at about 9:45 p.m. Friday to report that he had been approached from behind in the 3000 block of N. Charles St. by four males who went through his pockets and took his iPhone and...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
The LGBT community at Johns Hopkins University seems to be getting more organized by the minute. Since the spring, three new efforts to connect lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students and community members have launched -- one led by university students, one by university alumni and one by the university itself. "It's the outcome of a lot of work from a lot of people," said Demere Woolway, 30, hired in July to be the first director of the university's new LGBTQ Life program . "There's sort of a confluence of things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Johns Hopkins University now has its own official ice cream flavor, Blue Jay Batter. The blueberry cheesecake-flavored ice cream, which was developed for the university in collaboration with Dominion Ice Cream, is debuting at 2 p.m. today at a special event on the upper quad of Hopkins' Homewood Campus. Students, faculty and staff will be treated to free ice cream samples and Blue Jay Batter T-shirts. After the debut, Blue Jay Batter will be available just across the main campus at Dominion Ice Cream , which is best known for its vegetable ice cream flavor like sweet potato, spinach, carrot, sweet corn and beet.  Donna Calloway, the owner of Dominion Ice cream, mixed batch after batch until the new flavor acquired its nice bluejay-like shade, according to a Hopkins spokewoman.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
BALTIMORE'S CHARLES Village community could soon be the setting for a $5 million center for Jewish students at the Johns Hopkins University. The city's Design Advisory Panel has approved preliminary plans for the Smokler Center for Jewish Life at the Johns Hopkins University, a four-level building planned at 3109 N. Charles St., east of the Homewood campus. The building is a project of Hillel of Greater Baltimore, an organization that provides social, religious and educational services to Jewish college students.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Leslie Mancuso has been at the helm of Jhpiego, an international health affiliate of the Johns Hopkins University, for more than a decade. Under her leadership, the Fells Point-based organization has expanded significantly. The nonprofit's budget has multiplied nearly 50 times and its staff has increased ninefold. Most of those employees are located in outposts around the world. But the organization's mission has remained constant. Working with local governments and community leaders, Jhpiego trains health professionals and develops economical methods to improve care.
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