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NEWS
January 21, 2014
My colleagues and I greatly appreciate your paper's obituary discussing Dr. John Freeman's illustrious career ( "Dr. John Mark Freeman," Jan. 6). In the decades I worked with him, I recognized that although he was well known for his contributions relating to major brain surgery and the ketogenic diet for severe cases of epilepsy in children, he was especially proud of "Just Say No," an editorial in a 1990 medical journal addressing the care of children who experience seizures only when they have a fever.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014
My colleagues and I greatly appreciate your paper's obituary discussing Dr. John Freeman's illustrious career ( "Dr. John Mark Freeman," Jan. 6). In the decades I worked with him, I recognized that although he was well known for his contributions relating to major brain surgery and the ketogenic diet for severe cases of epilepsy in children, he was especially proud of "Just Say No," an editorial in a 1990 medical journal addressing the care of children who experience seizures only when they have a fever.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Thousands of children die or become disabled nationwide each year because of injuries caused by falls, drowning, choking, burns or suffocation. But a mobile safety center tries to prevent such incidents by taking the home safety message on the road to festivals and community events. According to public health officials, 6,700 children nationwide die annually because of injuries, and 50,000 are disabled. The CareS Safety Center, started by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Baltimore Fire Department, aims to cut into those numbers with interactive displays that illustrate how to keep people safe in every room of their homes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
Shirley A. Mark, a retired psychologist and educator, died May 28 of Parkinson's disease at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Mount Washington resident was 83. The former Shirley Alpern was born and raised in Pittsburgh, where she graduated from Allderdice High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1947 from the University of Pittsburgh. She later earned a master's degree and certificate in clinical psychology from City College of New York in 1949.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Perimenopause is that transitional time when a woman goes from having regular periods to ending menstruation. Dr. Howard A. Zacur, professor of reproductive endocrinology and director of the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, says not all women experience the same symptoms; some may not experience perimenopause at all. At 7 p.m. Feb. 24, Zacur will speak about perimenopause and answer questions...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
Shirley A. Mark, a retired psychologist and educator, died May 28 of Parkinson's disease at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Mount Washington resident was 83. The former Shirley Alpern was born and raised in Pittsburgh, where she graduated from Allderdice High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1947 from the University of Pittsburgh. She later earned a master's degree and certificate in clinical psychology from City College of New York in 1949.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1993
BALTIMORE* Nov. 13-18: Professional Lawn Care Association at Hyatt Regency. Contact Carol Moceri, 1000 Johnson Ferry Road N.E., Suite C-135, Marietta, Ga. 30068-2112. Expected attendance: 4,000.* Nov. 14-18: Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Uses in the Life Sciences. Contact Jeanne Ryan, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Turner 20, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21205. Attendees: 1,000.
NEWS
November 24, 1994
In Sunday's Perspective section, an article on federal funding for research universities may have left the impression that the new $140 million cancer center at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions had been delayed. While concern over funding did delay the start of construction, it is under way.* The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
November 7, 1996
In an article yesterday, The Sun failed to include a number of organizations that provide financial support for a Girl Scouts drop-in center at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in East Baltimore. Besides the Maryland Juvenile Justice Advisory Council, contributions also come from the Jacob and Annita France Foundation Inc., the Robert G. and Anne M. Merrick Foundation, the Hoffberger Foundation Inc., Kaiser Permanente, the Henry and Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Foundation Inc. and the Goldsmith Family Foundation Inc.Pub Date: 11/07/96
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Thousands of children die or become disabled nationwide each year because of injuries caused by falls, drowning, choking, burns or suffocation. But a mobile safety center tries to prevent such incidents by taking the home safety message on the road to festivals and community events. According to public health officials, 6,700 children nationwide die annually because of injuries, and 50,000 are disabled. The CareS Safety Center, started by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Baltimore Fire Department, aims to cut into those numbers with interactive displays that illustrate how to keep people safe in every room of their homes.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Perimenopause is that transitional time when a woman goes from having regular periods to ending menstruation. Dr. Howard A. Zacur, professor of reproductive endocrinology and director of the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, says not all women experience the same symptoms; some may not experience perimenopause at all. At 7 p.m. Feb. 24, Zacur will speak about perimenopause and answer questions...
NEWS
April 15, 2008
Charles F. Sevik, Friends may call at the Eline Funeral Home, 11824 Reisterstown Road (at Franklin Blvd.) on Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial, Tuesday, 9:00 A.M. at Sacred Heart Church, Glyndon. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. If desired contributions may be made to Pancreatic Cancer Research, Ralph H. Hruban, M.D., Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 401 North Broadway, Weinberg 2242 Baltimore, MD 21231-2410: www.ElineFuneralHome.com
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