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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
About 2,000 workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital have threatened to strike if the hospital does not agree to a wage increase of as much as 40 percent for some employees. A union representing the hospital's service and maintenance workers, including housekeepers and those who deliver food to patients, requested the increase because it said many of the workers rely on government assistance programs such as food stamps and Medicaid to support their families. The contract with the workers, members of labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, was set to expire at midnight Monday, and the two sides continued to negotiate late into the evening.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Newly suspicious of the pen hanging on a lanyard Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita A. Levy wore around his neck, a clinical technician who had worked with him for two years took it one day early last year. What she saw when she got home and plugged the device into her computer set off an investigation that shook thousands of women across the region and led the world-renowned hospital to pay $190 million to settle a class-action lawsuit. After she notified Hopkins officials, who viewed the files and confronted Levy, they did not contact city police for a few days.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital will begin a new round of negotiations with the medical institution Tuesday, several days after a strike was averted when Gov. Martin O'Malley asked both sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, is at odds with the hospital mostly over the issue of pay raises. Hospital officials said people's schedules made it better to meet earlier than to take a reprieve.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Using live pigs to train future doctors in surgery is unethical and unnecessary, members of a health and animal rights group said Thursday during a protest of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says Hopkins is one of four schools around the country that still use animals in training. About two dozen doctors and others held signs outside Johns Hopkins Hospital reading "Baltimore Deserves Better" and "End Animal Labs.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A man entered Johns Hopkins Hospital with a gun early Tuesday morning and is believed to have fatally shot himself inside an emergency room bathroom, an incident that came days after the medical center held a national symposium on safety inside hospitals. The man, who was 69 years old, was found dead with a gunshot wound to his chest shortly after midnight, Baltimore police spokeswoman Sgt. Sarah E. Connolly confirmed. Police would not identify him or provide additional details of the shooting, saying it was under investigation.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
For generations, patients entering Johns Hopkins Hospital walked past an oil painting of the founder and a marble statue of Jesus Christ. In the building that Hopkins opened this spring, they see blue and green rhinos, a flying ostrich and a purple cow jumping over 28 moons. The playful sculptures help differentiate the new building from its 19th-century predecessor, which seems hopelessly stuffy by comparison. But there's much more to the new Hopkins Hospital — Baltimore's first $1 billion building — than its sculptural menagerie.
NEWS
April 12, 1999
THE EASTERN edge of Baltimore's downtown is about to change beyond recognition.Already, a $184 million cancer complex is rising at Broadway and Orleans streets, next to Johns Hopkins Hospital. Neither of its two structures is a skyscraper; nevertheless, their combined square footage equals the 30-story Alex. Brown Building plus the 30-story Blaustein Building.The two buildings are several months from completion. Even so, they have made city officials realize the magnitude of the potential change as one of Baltimore's biggest employers grows even bigger.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Dr. Ghislaine D. "Ghilly" Godenne, a psychiatrist and a Belgian baroness who was the founder of the Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later was director of Johns Hopkins University Counseling and Psychiatric Services, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Roland Park Place. She was 89. Ghislaine Andree Flore Dudley Godenne was born the fourth of seven children in Brussels, Belgium. She was the daughter of a Belgian orthopedic surgeon and a British Red Cross volunteer who met at a French hospital during World War I and married the day the war ended.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Johns Hopkins, for decades ranked the best hospital in the country, has been through this before. Two years ago, it fell to No. 2 in the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings, regaining the top spot last year. But No. 3? "What a disaster!" said Dr. Ashish K. Jha, professor of health policy at Harvard School of Public Health, before quickly adding: "Just kidding. While these rankings are interesting, the bottom line is that Hopkins remains one of the very best hospitals in the world.
NEWS
By Yvonne Brown | June 26, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated from an earlier version to reflect developments.  On Friday, I and 2,000 of my co-workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital were scheduled to go on strike for the second time in two months. It's not a step we wanted to take, but one we felt we had to take. But late yesterday, our union president and Hopkins management agreed to a one-week cooling off period at Gov. Martin O'Malley's request. We hope that time will make a difference. For almost four months, we've been in talks with Hopkins management for a contract that would end poverty pay at our world-renowned hospital.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Charlotte Rollenhagen still remembers the first time she saw Dorothy Hutchins at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It was 1940, and the 10-year-old girl had been badly burned when her dress caught fire on the kitchen stove in her family's Highlandtown home. Her entire back was burned, as well as part of her left leg and her left arm, which she flapped in vain to put the flames out. "The picture of this little girl is indelibly placed in my mind," said Rollenhagen, who at the time was a rookie 21-year-old nurse.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Laurel A. Oleynick, a former X-ray technician and longtime volunteer, died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at the Loch Raven VA Community Living & Rehabilitation Center in Northeast Baltimore. She was 82. The daughter of Byron Coggins, a postal worker, and Estelle Coggins, a homemaker, Laurel Adele Coggins was born and raised on Nantucket. After graduating from Nantucket High School in 1949, she enlisted in the Air Force and served for seven years as a technician with the Strategic Air Command.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
Commendations to Johns Hopkins Hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East for their $15 per hour wage agreement ( "Hopkins workers approve contract," July 12). When wages are so low that workers cannot meet the basic needs of their families, it is not only degrading to the individual but non-productive for the employer. By contrast, paying a fair wage manifests self-respect in the employee who rewards the employer with more productivity, less sick days off and more loyalty to the company with less turnover.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Johns Hopkins, for decades ranked the best hospital in the country, has been through this before. Two years ago, it fell to No. 2 in the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings, regaining the top spot last year. But No. 3? "What a disaster!" said Dr. Ashish K. Jha, professor of health policy at Harvard School of Public Health, before quickly adding: "Just kidding. While these rankings are interesting, the bottom line is that Hopkins remains one of the very best hospitals in the world.
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When a motorcycle accident left Corey Davis strapped to a hospital bed seven years ago, he began to lose hope for a recovery. "This is it for the rest of my life," Davis, who suffered a severe traumatic brain injury that made him unable to walk, recalled thinking. But after six months of treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital's Outpatient NeuroRehabilitation Program, he was back on his feet. Now the race director for Saturday's Ocean Games, an ocean sports event in Ocean City , Davis continues to give back to the program that helped him return to the active lifestyle he once thought was no longer possible.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 10, 2011
Dr. George William Moore, who had practiced pathology in Baltimore since 1976 and was a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, died April 4 after a long illness. He was 65. During his career, Dr. Moore published hundreds of articles on pathology and computational medicine. His work in the closely related fields of medical informatics and pathology informatics, both of which emerged in the 1970s, was groundbreaking. Medical informatics covers the broad field of hospital computerization, while pathology informatics deals with the organization, retrieval and analysis of clinical laboratory data collected in medical centers.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Every working breastfeeding mother has had it happen at least once: You're on a break, ready to pump, when you discover you forgot a crucial piece of equipment.  Maybe it's a valve, a piece of tubing or a storage bag. You find yourself wondering if you can store milk in a water bottle or use butter as a nipple cream because there's no time to run home.  What can you do? Workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital can now purchase breastfeeding equipment from a vending machine -- believed to be the first of its kind.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
The tentative contract reached early Tuesday between Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union representing about 2,000 of its service workers represents a victory not only for the hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East but for Baltimore. The contract raises wages, in some case dramatically so, allowing Hopkins to set an example of what a "living wage" can mean for the health and security of workers in this city. It was a hard-fought effort that included a three-day strike in April and, more recently, intervention by Gov. Martin O'Malley to avert another such action.
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