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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The first day of summer will bring Grammy-winning singer Brandy and R&B veteran Johnny Gill to downtown Baltimore for this year's African American Festival, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced today at City Hall.  The free two-day festival will take place June 21-22 at the Camden Yards Sports & Entertainment Complex. The first day's performers include "R&B Divas" reality star and singer Monifah, Chico DeBarge, Jacob Latimore and the R&B/funk band Mint Condition.  On Sunday, Brandy and Gill will be joined by the Choir Boys and "Preachers of LA" cast member Deitrick Haddon.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The first day of summer will bring Grammy-winning singer Brandy and R&B veteran Johnny Gill to downtown Baltimore for this year's African American Festival, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced today at City Hall.  The free two-day festival will take place June 21-22 at the Camden Yards Sports & Entertainment Complex. The first day's performers include "R&B Divas" reality star and singer Monifah, Chico DeBarge, Jacob Latimore and the R&B/funk band Mint Condition.  On Sunday, Brandy and Gill will be joined by the Choir Boys and "Preachers of LA" cast member Deitrick Haddon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 11, 1993
PROVOCATIVEJohnny Gill (Motown 37463 6355)With all due respect to Johnny Gill, it's probably a mistake to call an album "Provocative" when it isn't, really. Sexy, soulful and well-sung? Sure. At this point, Gill does the deep-voiced soul man shtick better than anyone in the business, and his performance on tunes like "Long Way from Home" or the Marvin Gaye-ish "A Cute, Sweet, Love Addiction" offers a near-perfect combination of sensitivity and power. Even better, he can move from the steamy insinuation of "Mastersuite" to the bass-pumping insistence of "The Floor" without straining either his voice or the listener's credulity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,Boston Globe | January 6, 1995
It's a shock that the stunningly beautiful man known as Babyface, the writer of so many soft and airy ballads, has a voice like polished granite. His words, when spoken as Kenneth Edmonds, are cool, smooth and undeniably strong.It's only the songs that seem helium-filled, hovering on sweet melodies that have made Babyface one of the most successful pop songwriters ever. Mr. Edmonds, 36, produces a song with the diligence of a palace chef creating a meal for a king, as if his life depended on the outcome.
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
It's been a while since anyone has heard from the once-popular band 'Til Tuesday.Since the band broke out of Boston in 1985 with the huge hit "Voices Carry," it has been a long, downhill ride for singer/bassist Aimee Mann's band.'Til Tuesday had two follow-up albums, "Welcome Home" and "Everything Is Different Now," but neither received much airplay or had nearly the gold success of the band's debut.Since the third album flopped two years ago, Mann has been working diligently to get the band off of Epic Records and onto a label that she felt would better promote her music.
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
With a name like Every Mother's Nightmare, image can be big problem."We're kind of viewed like some thrash heavy metal metal band -- death metal or something," said guitarist Steve Malone.It's an easy, yet false, assumption to make. The album cover is full of dark features and the band's gothic logo, featuring an angry skull, certainly don't help to sell it as anything even remotely mainstream.But all it takes is one listen to Nightmare's self-titled debut album -- just your basic Southern-influenced hard rock with a couple of power ballads thrown in -- to realize that this is one band that shouldn't be judged by its cover.
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 24, 1991
With the release of his latest album, "The Soul Cages," Sting has distinguished himself as one of the world's biggest touring rock star who hasn't written a rock song in eight years.Where its two predecessors, "The Dream of the Blue Turtles" and ". . . Nothing Like the Sun," were basically jazz fusion works laden with pop influences, "Cages" portrays a distant, almost new-age sound.Only two songs on this departure album bare any pop sounds at all; the bouncy "All This Time," wisely chosen as the first single, and the title track, which is led by the big drum sound of Manu Katche and the light guitar riffs of Dominic Miller.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Much like it treated rap 10 years ago, the media has ignored industrial music in its formative stages as an alternative form of music.But, at least in Baltimore, it seems that is changing.The industrial music scene here has spawned underground garage-type bands and clubs, and the fervent fans that frequent these establishments will converge on the unlikely rock location of Hammerjacks Saturday night for a show featuring Nine Inch Nails and Die Warzau.For many in the industrial community, it is a coming out party.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
It's not unusual for area concert promoters to talk about a "soft" market or a lack of quality shows during the post-holiday season.But the problems in booking performances this season has extended beyond the run-of-the-mill weather related difficulties and lack of record sales after Christmas.One promoter said thinking about the future of live music in the Baltimore-Washington marketplace is "frightening."A quick glimpse at the concert calendar shows its obvious holes.The Capital Centre has four acts on its schedule: ZZ Top (Sunday and Monday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,Boston Globe | January 6, 1995
It's a shock that the stunningly beautiful man known as Babyface, the writer of so many soft and airy ballads, has a voice like polished granite. His words, when spoken as Kenneth Edmonds, are cool, smooth and undeniably strong.It's only the songs that seem helium-filled, hovering on sweet melodies that have made Babyface one of the most successful pop songwriters ever. Mr. Edmonds, 36, produces a song with the diligence of a palace chef creating a meal for a king, as if his life depended on the outcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 11, 1993
PROVOCATIVEJohnny Gill (Motown 37463 6355)With all due respect to Johnny Gill, it's probably a mistake to call an album "Provocative" when it isn't, really. Sexy, soulful and well-sung? Sure. At this point, Gill does the deep-voiced soul man shtick better than anyone in the business, and his performance on tunes like "Long Way from Home" or the Marvin Gaye-ish "A Cute, Sweet, Love Addiction" offers a near-perfect combination of sensitivity and power. Even better, he can move from the steamy insinuation of "Mastersuite" to the bass-pumping insistence of "The Floor" without straining either his voice or the listener's credulity.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 24, 1991
With the release of his latest album, "The Soul Cages," Sting has distinguished himself as one of the world's biggest touring rock star who hasn't written a rock song in eight years.Where its two predecessors, "The Dream of the Blue Turtles" and ". . . Nothing Like the Sun," were basically jazz fusion works laden with pop influences, "Cages" portrays a distant, almost new-age sound.Only two songs on this departure album bare any pop sounds at all; the bouncy "All This Time," wisely chosen as the first single, and the title track, which is led by the big drum sound of Manu Katche and the light guitar riffs of Dominic Miller.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Much like it treated rap 10 years ago, the media has ignored industrial music in its formative stages as an alternative form of music.But, at least in Baltimore, it seems that is changing.The industrial music scene here has spawned underground garage-type bands and clubs, and the fervent fans that frequent these establishments will converge on the unlikely rock location of Hammerjacks Saturday night for a show featuring Nine Inch Nails and Die Warzau.For many in the industrial community, it is a coming out party.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
It's not unusual for area concert promoters to talk about a "soft" market or a lack of quality shows during the post-holiday season.But the problems in booking performances this season has extended beyond the run-of-the-mill weather related difficulties and lack of record sales after Christmas.One promoter said thinking about the future of live music in the Baltimore-Washington marketplace is "frightening."A quick glimpse at the concert calendar shows its obvious holes.The Capital Centre has four acts on its schedule: ZZ Top (Sunday and Monday)
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
It's been a while since anyone has heard from the once-popular band 'Til Tuesday.Since the band broke out of Boston in 1985 with the huge hit "Voices Carry," it has been a long, downhill ride for singer/bassist Aimee Mann's band.'Til Tuesday had two follow-up albums, "Welcome Home" and "Everything Is Different Now," but neither received much airplay or had nearly the gold success of the band's debut.Since the third album flopped two years ago, Mann has been working diligently to get the band off of Epic Records and onto a label that she felt would better promote her music.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
With a name like Every Mother's Nightmare, image can be big problem."We're kind of viewed like some thrash heavy metal metal band -- death metal or something," said guitarist Steve Malone.It's an easy, yet false, assumption to make. The album cover is full of dark features and the band's gothic logo, featuring an angry skull, certainly don't help to sell it as anything even remotely mainstream.But all it takes is one listen to Nightmare's self-titled debut album -- just your basic Southern-influenced hard rock with a couple of power ballads thrown in -- to realize that this is one band that shouldn't be judged by its cover.
FEATURES
September 25, 1992
Johnny Gill, Boyz II Men and Shanice have helped Motown Records stage a remarkable resurgence in the last several years. Now the legendary rhythm and blues label hopes to create similar excitement over some of its old recordings.The Hollywood-based label recently announced it has unearthed old material by the Jackson 5, Marvin Gaye, the Four Tops, the
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 27, 2007
At 7 p.m. Sunday, the Lyric Opera House plays host to a concert by R&B stars Keith Sweat, Johnny Gill and Raheem DeVaughn. Last month, Sweat released a Christmas album, A Christmas of Love. Gill, who replaced Bobby Brown in the group New Edition, is best known for his ballads. And DeVaughn, a Beltsville native who attended Coppin State University, released his first album, The Love Experience, in 2005, and his song "Woman" was recently nominated for a best male R&B vocal performance Grammy Award.
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