Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohnny Cash
IN THE NEWS

Johnny Cash

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger and Sylvia Badger,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
JOHNNY CASH was in Baltimore recently to make three commercials for Choice Hotels International. His voice is raspy and he has a slight cigarette cough. As he took another draw of his cigarette, he said, "I've overcome almost every addiction there is, but quitting cigarettes is harder than quitting morphine addiction."QUESTION. Your election into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a great honor, but it confuses me because I associate you only with country music. Can you explain?ANSWER. I was a rock pioneer back in 1955 at Sun Records, when I performed with Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009
SATURDAY EAGLES OF DEATH METAL: EoDM give you wiggles and make your rump shake. The band's first album, "Peace Love Death Metal," was a nonstop, electrified romp of dance-worthy rock, and the most recent, "Heart On," offers more of the same. There's nothing death-metal about this high-energy set, though. Expect good old-fashioned sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. Go to ramsheadlive.com. SUMMER SPIRIT FESTIVAL: Sultry songstress Erykah Badu headlines this R&B- and soul-filled concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, at 5:30 p.m. Godfather of go-go Chuck Brown and former Tony!
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2000
Usually, when it gets to be boxed-set time for an artist, the idea is to assemble a selection of songs that sums up just what made this person a star. It's a statement of identity, a portrait in sound. But what Johnny Cash ended up with, after compiling the tunes for the three-CD set "Love, God, Murder" (ColumbiaAmericanLegacy 63809, arriving in stores today), wasn't the definitive statement on his own career, but a summation of country music itself. In this collection, Cash -- who chose every song personally -- reduces his career to three themes.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 7, 2008
There's always something new from Hallmark, the sappy, greeting-card people, and this year is no exception. This year's ground-breaking innovation is: Mother's Day cards that let you record a 10-second message to Mom and play a clip of the song that's apparently become synonymous with motherhood, Tag Team's "Whoomp! There It Is." OK, maybe you're thinking: Gee, I didn't know that song was big with mothers. Well, neither did I. In fact, I seem to recall lyrics about shaking derrieres and swilling gin and juice and puff- ing something stronger than a Marlboro Light.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1993
It's Saturday the 13th, which, as savvy TV viewers know, is a very unlucky day -- not because of the 13th, but because Saturday usually offers dull TV. Tonight is no exception, which means it's unexceptional. And don't cry for "The Paula Poundstone Show." After two telecasts, it's already ridden off into the sunset -- or just slightly south of sunset.* "George" (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- This episode's plot fits star George Foreman like a glove -- a boxing glove, that is. And while the resolution is predictably heartwarming, the predicament -- kids using violence to make a name for themselves in the neighborhood -- is very real, and is dramatized with more credibility than expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony DeCurtis and Anthony DeCurtis,New York Times News Service | March 3, 2002
On the cover of his album Ragged Old Flag, Johnny Cash stands resolute, staring directly at the viewer and pointing to an American flag that is torn and tattered but still flying. His face looks as if it could grace Mount Rushmore. Like the flag behind him, it's weathered and battle-worn, but nonetheless defiant. "She's been through the fire before," Cash intones on the album's title track, alluding to the flag and the country it represents, "and I believe she can take a whole lot more."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
To many music fans, American country - whatever the style - amounts to caterwauling about wayward women, diesel-powered pickups and flea-bitten hounds. It's easy to satirize that way. But doesn't every art form have its obvious points of reference? Is French impressionism any less stunning for its fixation on, say, flower gardens and ballerinas? It's what you do with the content that matters. The death of Johnny Cash on Friday was a reminder that even in the down-home, populist universe of country music, snobbery abounds.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 17, 2000
Anyone who's ever heard him knows that Johnny Cash has one of the most distinctive voices in popular music. Deep and drawling, it's steeped in the power and menace of masculinity while at the same time coating its darker resonances with a sly, honeyed sweetness. His is a sound so inimitable that it almost seems redundant to hear him to say, "Hi, I'm Johnny Cash." Who else could that voice belong to? But because he's so often himself when he performs -- the Man in Black, the voice of "I Walk the Line" and "Ring of Fire" -- it's easy to forget just how great a singer Cash can be. Fortunately, he and producer Rick Rubin have provided a small reminder, in the form of Cash's new album, "American III: Solitary Man," arriving in stores today.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
His gruff, rebellious manner and penchant for black clothes bolstered his profile just as rock 'n' roll took shape in the 1950s. But Johnny Cash's brooding baritone, underdog lyrics and distinctive, spare musical style cemented his legend. The 10-time Grammy winner known as the Man in Black died in Nashville yesterday at age 71 of heart failure due to complications from diabetes. His career spanned more than half a century, and through the years he invigorated country music with insightful, sometimes stinging lyrics that gave voice to the downtrodden and the forgotten.
SPORTS
By KATIE CARRERA | August 4, 2006
Tight end Quinn Sypniewski was a fifth-round draft pick for the Ravens this year. In his final season at Colorado he played in all 13 games, started seven and had 29 receptions for 447 yards and five touchdowns. What type of music do you listen to? "I listen to a wide variety of music, but it pretty much consists of rock and country. It doesn't stray too far from that." What is the last movie that you saw? "I don't know what the last thing I saw was but the best thing I've seen lately was Walk the Line.
NEWS
By David French and David French,Los Angeles Times | September 17, 2006
Johnny Cash: The Biography Michael Streissguth Da Capo Press / 320 pages / $26 The Man in Black. It was a corny moniker straight out of a Western comic book or a Gene Autry movie. On anyone else it would seem like pure showbiz hokum - pretentious and ridiculous. Yet on Johnny Cash, somehow, you believed it. Or you accepted it because you wanted to believe it. With his weary, haunted face, his dark eyes and, of course, that resonant bass-baritone voice, Cash could sing about the extremes of love and death, ruin and salvation with the authority of someone who had lived them.
SPORTS
By KATIE CARRERA | August 4, 2006
Tight end Quinn Sypniewski was a fifth-round draft pick for the Ravens this year. In his final season at Colorado he played in all 13 games, started seven and had 29 receptions for 447 yards and five touchdowns. What type of music do you listen to? "I listen to a wide variety of music, but it pretty much consists of rock and country. It doesn't stray too far from that." What is the last movie that you saw? "I don't know what the last thing I saw was but the best thing I've seen lately was Walk the Line.
FEATURES
By GEOFF BOUCHER and GEOFF BOUCHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2006
The first sound is a toddler huffing into a microphone, a sound familiar to any parent who has vainly tried to coax a child into speaking for posterity. The next sound is the child's father. His voice, a hickory rumble, is instantly recognizable as the late, great Johnny Cash. "Rosanne, say `C'mon.'" That little snippet, culled from a home reel-to-reel recording, is the opening moment on Black Cadillac, the new album from Rosanne Cash, and it gives way quickly to the gothic, simmering title track that, like the whole album, deals with grief, pain and the enduring human spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2005
Talib Kweli Right About Now: The Official Sucka Free CD [Koch Records] * * (2 stars) Brooklyn-born MC Talib Kweli is a hip-hop rarity: a conscious rapper who enjoys commercial success and significant, unquestioned underground credibility. That's one of the reasons hip-hop fans from the 'hood to the 'burbs and everywhere in between have been eagerly anticipating his latest release. The former member of Black Star has made a name for himself by rapping in compelling, realistic and human terms about topics all but played out by mainstream rappers: poverty, violence, individual struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By YAHOO! SHOPPING | November 24, 2005
Downloaded singles 1.Hung Up, Madonna 2.My Humps, Black Eyed Peas 3.Run It! (Remix featuring Juelz Santana), Chris Brown 4.Stickwitu, Pussycat Dolls 5.Photograph, Nickelback[ Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.Confessions on a Dance Floor (Deluxe Version), Madonna 2.16 Biggest Hits: Johnny Cash, Johnny Cash 3.Some Hearts, Carrie Underwood 4.Get Rich or Die Tryin' (Music from and inspired by the motion picture), Various artists 5.Confessions on a Dance Floor (non-stop mix; deluxe version)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 18, 2005
Studio publicity states that June Carter Cash was an early inspiration for Reese Witherspoon, who plays Johnny Cash's true love and salvation in Walk the Line. That's surprising, considering Witherspoon, 29, is known for artistic independence (she heads her own production company, Type A), while Carter gave public statements like, "I find my happiness from trying to make John comfortable and happy. And I try to take everything off him that would cause him worry. And he does me the same way."
ENTERTAINMENT
By YAHOO! SHOPPING | November 24, 2005
Downloaded singles 1.Hung Up, Madonna 2.My Humps, Black Eyed Peas 3.Run It! (Remix featuring Juelz Santana), Chris Brown 4.Stickwitu, Pussycat Dolls 5.Photograph, Nickelback[ Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.Confessions on a Dance Floor (Deluxe Version), Madonna 2.16 Biggest Hits: Johnny Cash, Johnny Cash 3.Some Hearts, Carrie Underwood 4.Get Rich or Die Tryin' (Music from and inspired by the motion picture), Various artists 5.Confessions on a Dance Floor (non-stop mix; deluxe version)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 9, 1994
Spend some time with Johnny Cash's latest album, "American Recordings," and you'll hear songs about love, songs about faith and songs about the cruel tricks fate can play. Typical Johnny Cash material, in other words.But what seems to startle listeners the most is the amount of violence in the album. Much of it is implied, as in the tortured life described in "Thirteen." But some of the violence is quite vivid, like in "Delia's Gone," where the protagonist sings "First time I shot her, I shot her in the side/Hard to watch her suffer, but with the second shot she died."
NEWS
May 30, 2005
Arnold "Arnie" Morton, 83, who founded the chain of steakhouses that bear his name and helped launch the first Playboy Club and the annual Taste of Chicago food festival, died Saturday at a nursing home in suburban Deerfield, Ill. He had suffered from Alzheimer's disease and cancer, his family said. Mr. Morton's first restaurant, the Walton Walk, opened in the 1950s and paved the way for his partnership with Hugh Hefner, Victor Lownes and the Playboy Club they opened in 1960. He left Playboy in the early 1970s and ran several nightspots, then opened his first Morton's steakhouse in Chicago's Gold Coast neighborhood in 1978.
TRAVEL
By Tom Uhlenbrock | April 3, 2005
There's more to Nashville than country music, although it's hard to ignore the city's most famous industry. I walked into the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, seeking a little culture, and came face to face with the late Gram Parson's cream-colored suit decorated with embroidered marijuana leaves. He wore it on the album cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin when he played with the Flying Burrito Brothers back in 1969. The Frist Center, in a renovated art deco structure built as a post office in 1934, has no permanent art collection but rotates exhibitions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.