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By Kay Gardella and Kay Gardella,New York Daily News | May 21, 1992
"It's been a hell of a roll of the dice, a great 22 years," declared Fred de Cordova, Johnny Carson's talented executive producer, who started with the "Tonight" show on Oct. 10, 1970.While he'll be leaving with Mr. Carson on Friday, Mr. de Cordova is making himself available during the transition period on a consulting basis for Jay Leno and NBC. Mr. Leno's new executive producer will be his manager, Helen Kushnick.Mr. de Cordova hasn't heard any regrets or second thoughts from Mr. Carson.
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Susan Reimer | September 5, 2014
Comedian Joan Rivers once talked about how she came of age in the mid 1960s with Richard Pryor, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen and George Carlin in comedy clubs in Greenwich Village, where Johnny Carson's people would troll for new talent. She recalled that she was the last of the group to make it to "The Tonight Show," the last of the pack "allowed" to break through. "When I started out, a pretty girl did not go into comedy," she said. "I never was one of the guys, I was never asked to go hang out. "Looking back, I think it was because I was a woman, I was the very last one of the group they put on the Carson show.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 7, 1992
Two weeks and counting, more or less, to the departure of Johnny Carson from NBC's "Tonight Show." Tonight, the late-night monarch gets an affectionate salute from another of the network's top shows, "Cheers" (at 9 o'clock, Channel 2).In an episode in which Carson and bandleader Doc Severinsen both appear, we also see subtle hints that all is not harmonious in the transition process. (Carson's final show is scheduled for May 22, with designated replacement Jay Leno and company taking over the following week.
NEWS
By David Horsey | March 26, 2013
Jay Leno had to know the head honchos at NBC were gunning for him when he told the following joke last Monday night: "You know the whole legend of St. Patrick, right?" he asked the audience in his opening monologue. "St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland -- and then they came to the United States and became NBC executives. " The harsh humor directed at the guys who hold his fate in their hands is just the latest sign that the star and the bosses pretty much detest each other.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 17, 1992
His overall ratings were bad and getting worse. Young women -- the viewers advertisers most want to attract -- downright hated him. College students groaned when you said his name. If he hadn't announced his retirement a year ago himself, NBC might have had to step in and do it for him -- the affiliates wanted Johnny Carson out that badly."He performed horribly for us," said Arnold J. Kleiner, general manager of WMAR (Channel 2), the NBC affiliate in Baltimore. "The guy was a dog for us. The show was a dog for us."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
It didn't take much, maybe a wave of the hand, a thumbs-up sign, or a simple laugh. Just some indication the guy sitting behind the desk liked you, that was all a struggling young comic needed. When Johnny Carson died yesterday at age 79, comedians all over America lost the best promoter they ever had. By all accounts, Carson loved nothing more than showcasing new talent. "Bill Cosby started on his show, George Carlin started on his show. I started on it, and David Brenner," Joan Rivers, a favorite of Carson's until she started her own show, told CNN yesterday.
SPORTS
November 17, 1991
Q. I've often wondered how a relief pitcher earned a save.T. J. TotushekLinthicum HeightsA. The word "earned," of course, is a relative one. Does Johnny Carson "earn" his $385 kazillion-per-year salary? Will Glenn Davis "earn" his $2.8 million next season if he is reinjured? Does the person writing this "earn" a salary from The Sun for so little work? (On second thought, let's back up to Johnny Carson.) Anyway, here is the save rule -- adopted in 1975 -- as cited in the Baltimore Orioles media guide:"Credit a pitcher with a save when he is the finishing, but not the winning pitcher, and when he qualifies under one of the following conditions:"(1)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- If you listen carefully amid the applause for Johnny Carson as he prepares to leave late-night television after 30 years, you might hear the sound of cash registers ringing.Between now and May 22, when the final "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" will run, NBC will raise its rates for a 30-second commercial, in stages, about fivefold -- yes, fivefold -- to almost $200,000 for the finale.That instant inflation from the regular price of $40,000 will place the show's rates on a par with what marketers like Miller Brewing and Wendy's might pay for a 30-second commercial on a hit prime-time series like "Roseanne."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | October 9, 1990
If anyone has seen it all it's probably Ed McMahon. Johnny Carson's favorite straight man, who also hosts "Star Search" and "TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes," recalls one memorable occasion on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson."It involved Don Rickles, whom McMahon says is an immaculate dresser. "He even has a man who travels with him, Harry, who for years has been his dresser. So he's very natty. He doesn't put his clothes on till the last minute -- the tie is perfect, the coat."
NEWS
May 21, 1992
WHEN THE King of Late Night bids his television audience farewell for the last time in the wee hours tomorrow (it will actually be early on Saturday, Eastern Daylight Time, when we see it here), it will mark the end of an era in cultural American history.Thirty years of Johnny Carson is a lifetime for many of us. He has become as familiar as the bedroom furniture. And just as comfortable, and as predictably cozy, as those warm winter slippers.But the real generational symbol is hardly getting any notice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here we go again with reports that NBC is looking to ditch Jay Leno. But this time, the ditching makes eminent sense. The Hollywood Reporter, citing unnamed sources, says NBC is putting the pieces in place to announce in May that Leno will be replaced in latenight  at the end of the 2013-2014 season by Jimmy Fallon. Why not? Leno, whose contract is up in 2014, is yesterday - and then some. He can still draw overall ratings, but you can't sell overall ratings the way you can sell the 18 to 49 or even 25-54 demographics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
From Norman Rockwell and Leonard Bernstein to Baltimore's Cab Calloway, no one does biography like "American Masters" on PBS. I've been reviewing these superb productions for all of the 26 seasons that "American Masters" has been on the air, and have written some variation of that line for at least 25 of them. And tonight's "Johnny Carson: King of Late Night" is one of the 10 greatest biographies this sublime series has delivered. Maybe one of the five best. But let's not quibble.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Joan Rivers is having a manicure and a pedicure in her hotel room while juggling a phone. "I'm in Indianapolis," she says. "I just learned how to spell it, and now I'm leaving. What a waste. " This week, between gigs in Florida and Ohio, she'll stop by the Hippodrome to dispense her trademark observations on her own world and anyone, anything that catches her attention. "When I go onstage, I just talk about what's happening," Rivers says. "My life is an open book. The other day we were stuck in Milwaukee, and they lost our luggage.
NEWS
August 18, 2009
ED REIMERS, 96 Allstate commercial actor Ed Reimers, the actor who told television viewers, "You're in good hands with Allstate" for decades, died Sunday in upstate New York. The cause of death wasn't immediately clear. Mr. Reimers was best known for delivering the Allstate Corp.'s famous slogan. He was the insurance giant's TV spokesman for 22 years, starting in 1957, according to the Northbrook, Ill.-based company's Web site. Meanwhile, Mr. Reimers was an announcer for programs including the popular Western "Maverick" and the game show "Do You Trust Your Wife?"
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
"I want to show you something." Johnny Holliday is standing in the front hallway of his home in Kensington. His graying hair is parted, as always, perfectly to the left, not a single strand out of place. He grins, flashing his immaculately white upper teeth, and gestures toward the wall. "I am as proud of this stuff as I am anything in the world," he says. His voice, a syrupy blend of Johnny Carson and Bob Barker, goes quiet. Johnny Holliday - John to his friends, Dad to his three adult daughters - has spent a lifetime describing the world as it unfolds in front of him. But in this moment, he is struggling with what he wants to say. It's hard to communicate, emotionally, what's in front of him. It's a painting.
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By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 2, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Comedy and caring don't mix, so you knew Jay Leno and David Letterman - who are professional rivals but also, at bottom, the same removed, iconoclastic human being - were going to be out of their element paying tribute to Johnny Carson on their respective shows. Still, what was revealing, watching Leno's on-air memorial a week ago and then Letterman's on Monday night (his show was dark last week) was how much the shows betrayed the comics' personal relationships with Carson.
NEWS
August 18, 2009
ED REIMERS, 96 Allstate commercial actor Ed Reimers, the actor who told television viewers, "You're in good hands with Allstate" for decades, died Sunday in upstate New York. The cause of death wasn't immediately clear. Mr. Reimers was best known for delivering the Allstate Corp.'s famous slogan. He was the insurance giant's TV spokesman for 22 years, starting in 1957, according to the Northbrook, Ill.-based company's Web site. Meanwhile, Mr. Reimers was an announcer for programs including the popular Western "Maverick" and the game show "Do You Trust Your Wife?"
FEATURES
By Stuart Elliott and Stuart Elliott,New York Times News Service | April 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- If you listen carefully amid the applause for Johnny Carson as he prepares to leave late-night television after 30 years, you might hear the sound of cash registers ringing.Between now and May 22, when the final "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" will run, NBC will raise its rates for a 30-second commercial, in stages, about fivefold -- yes, fivefold -- to almost $200,000 for the finale.That instant inflation from the regular price of $40,000 will place the show's rates on a par with what marketers like Miller Brewing and Wendy's might pay for a 30-second commercial on a hit prime-time series like "Roseanne."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - I heard Johnny Carson before I ever saw him. He was an indistinct voice coming out of the living room late at night when I was supposed to be asleep. I'd hear the brass punching its way through the familiar theme, Ed McMahon calling, "Heeeeere's Johnny" and then that wry, puckish voice saying things I couldn't quite hear, stuff that made my mother laugh even as I lay there wondering what wonderful thing I was missing. But Mr. Carson was still there when I got old enough to see for myself.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 26, 2005
WE LOST so much more than Johnny Carson when he died Sunday. The man who hosted The Tonight Show for 30 years was 79 when he passed. He was born in 1925 and grew up during the Depression and World War II. The country always loses when someone from that generation dies. When what has been called America's "greatest generation" vanishes, we will not see its like again. Carson took over as host of The Tonight Show in 1962, in an America quite unlike the one we have today. For five nights a week, Carson would treat viewers to comedy that came within inches of crossing the line that separates the acceptable from the risque.
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