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Johnnie Cochran

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NEWS
February 10, 1995
FOR those of you who get to bed well before midnight, here's what "Late Show" host David Letterman has been saying lately about the O.J. Simpson trial:"Ladies and gentlemen, tonight we have three scheduled guests and 22 surprise witnesses.""Sorry I'm a little late. I was backstage hitting golf balls.""I don't want to say Robert Shapiro has nothing to do, but earlier today, he begged Judge Ito to let him be bailiff for the day.""The O.J. Simpson jury is getting a little edgy after being sequestered for three weeks.
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NEWS
By Carla Hall and Carla Hall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2005
Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., the masterful attorney who gained prominence as an early advocate for victims of police abuse, then achieved worldwide fame for successfully defending football star O.J. Simpson on murder charges, died yesterday afternoon. He was 67. Mr. Cochran died at his home in the Los Feliz section of Los Angeles of an inoperable brain tumor, said his brother-in-law Bill Baker. Mr. Cochran's wife and his two sisters were with him at his death. Mr. Cochran, his family and colleagues were secretive about his illness to protect the attorney's privacy as well as the network of Cochran law offices that largely draw their cachet from his presence.
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FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 14, 1996
JOHNNIE Cochran spoke last night at UMBC. He was everything I thought he'd be, only shorter.Also, he wore a dark suit when I had my heart set on the famous Cochran lavender or maybe even (dared I hope it?) periwinkle.The tie was suitably bright, though. And the handkerchief matched.And so did the talk.Oh, he can talk the talk.Which is why his man, O. J. Simpson, got to walk the walk.Cochran said it himself: "There's no doubt in my mind that if Mr. Simpson didn't have the resources he had, he'd be in prison right now."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - In the age of the celebrity trial, the staid U.S. Supreme Court had its own brush with fame yesterday, courtesy of showman lawyer Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. and a case with broad implications for free speech rights. As the legal travails of the rich and famous go, it wasn't much to see. There were no satellite trucks, no Court TV commentators or late night re-enactments on E! Entertainment Television. There was not even an appearance by Cochran himself, the flashy lawyer to the stars who gained infamy in the O.J. Simpson murder trial with the simple catch phrase: "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 20, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- The Dream Team emerged from the elevator on the ground floor of the Criminal Courts Building and charged the waiting microphone like moths gang-tackling a flame.They are O. J. Simpson's lead attorneys: Johnnie Cochran, Robert Shapiro and F. Lee Bailey. And, having just finished pleading their case in a court of law this day, they were now preparing to plead it in the court of public opinion.Sometimes it is hard to tell which seems more important to them.O. J. Simpson, on trial for two murders, cares only about what happens in court.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 1, 1995
So now, in the dying hours of the O.J. Simpson murder case, when you think you've learned everything there is to be learned about this man, we have one last bit of evidence thrown at us in the cause of his defense:O.J. Simpson is accused of being a halfback.At such a declaration, the earnestness spills from attorney Johnnie L. Cochran's pores. Halfbacks aren't aggressors, Cochran reminds us. Their job is to avoid contact. Who ever heard of a halfback being a hacker of innocent people? Everybody knows halfbacks don't do such things.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
Suing the city would diminish Dawsons' legacy What's wrong? Is Johnnie Cochran's law firm in financial trouble? Is that why he seems to be trying his level best to tarnish the memory of the Dawson family ("Anti-drug campaign blamed in Dawson arson deaths," Jan. 8)? This family, this special, one-of-a-kind family, gave their very lives to fight for something they believed in. It was their choice to fight. It was their choice to remain in their home after the state's attorney's office offered to relocate them.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 8, 1995
AFTER MANY years of watching the most widely celebrated trial in human history, I slipped quietly into a coma. Johnnie Cochran objected. I was deeply flattered.Johnnie Cochran was the most brilliant defense attorney to put a leaden thumb on the scales of justice since Socrates argued his own case. Now he was objecting to my very own coma. Surely there were rich book possibilities here.Judge Lance Ito dealt summarily with him. "Cochran," said Judge Ito, "go eat your prunes." Marcia Clark objected that it was unfair to give dietary advice to the defense.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 1, 1995
Why did O. J. Simpson's lawyers break the law to keep a slew of witnesses secret from the prosecution?Why did his lawyers risk such a tactic, knowing they might be sanctioned by Judge Lance Ito and reprimanded before the jury?Because they don't care, that's why.Here are four elements shaping defense thinking and defense tactics at the Simpson trial:1. Ito hates us anyway. Judge Ito has ruled against the defense on virtually all major and most minor issues.The defense is convinced that Ito is not going to give them any breaks and is going to rule with the prosecution on all close calls and some not so close calls.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2000
As the city state's attorney's office winds down its investigation into Larry Hubbard's death, lawyers for the family of the unarmed man shot and killed by a Baltimore police officer filed a $60 million wrongful-death suit yesterday. The state's attorney's office is expected to announce early next week the outcome of an apparent grand jury investigation into the death of Hubbard, who was shot in the back of the head and killed Oct. 6 at Barclay and 20th streets. Deputy State's Attorney Haven H. Kodeck refused to confirm the impaneling of a grand jury, which could indict officers Robert J. Quick and Barry W. Hamilton on criminal charges or rule the shooting justifiable.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
Suing the city would diminish Dawsons' legacy What's wrong? Is Johnnie Cochran's law firm in financial trouble? Is that why he seems to be trying his level best to tarnish the memory of the Dawson family ("Anti-drug campaign blamed in Dawson arson deaths," Jan. 8)? This family, this special, one-of-a-kind family, gave their very lives to fight for something they believed in. It was their choice to fight. It was their choice to remain in their home after the state's attorney's office offered to relocate them.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Del Quentin Wilber and Laura Vozzella and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
In a legal memo expected to land at City Hall in a matter of days, attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. will claim the city bears responsibility for the October arson murder of an East Baltimore family - in part because the anti-drug "Baltimore Believe" campaign encouraged residents to speak out against dealers, a lawyer working with Cochran said yesterday. Cochran is representing relatives of the Dawson family, who prosecutors say were killed in retaliation for reporting neighborhood dealers to police.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 2000
Do you really want to go back and relive the whole O.J. Simpson mess? That's the question you should ask yourself before sitting down tomorrow night for the start of the four-hour CBS miniseries, "American Tragedy," starring Ron Silver, Ving Rhames, Christopher Plummer and Bruno Kirby. Despite the pretentious title and taint of sleaze associated with treating such material in an entertainment format, "American Tragedy" is not without merit. It's just that once you dip your toe back in these waters and let yourself flow with the narrative tide, you end the viewing experience feeling like you really, really need a long, hot shower with lots of soap.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Paul McMullen and Bill Glauber and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - With his Olympic credentials lifted, his reputation in tatters and his wife, Marion Jones, in the midst of track and field's most audacious gold-medal quest, shot-putter C. J. Hunter said today that he did not knowingly take performance-enhancing drugs. Choked up and tearful, Hunter was responding to reports he has tested positive for steroids. "I've been through too much in my life to take any chances like this," Hunter said. "I don't know what has happened." Hunter said the positive drug tests could be the result of tainted dietary supplements.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2000
As the city state's attorney's office winds down its investigation into Larry Hubbard's death, lawyers for the family of the unarmed man shot and killed by a Baltimore police officer filed a $60 million wrongful-death suit yesterday. The state's attorney's office is expected to announce early next week the outcome of an apparent grand jury investigation into the death of Hubbard, who was shot in the back of the head and killed Oct. 6 at Barclay and 20th streets. Deputy State's Attorney Haven H. Kodeck refused to confirm the impaneling of a grand jury, which could indict officers Robert J. Quick and Barry W. Hamilton on criminal charges or rule the shooting justifiable.
NEWS
By DeWayne Wickham | December 10, 1999
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Last month, shortly after a jury was seated in the wrongful-death lawsuit brought against the owner of a suburban shopping mall here, attorney Johnnie Cochran, who represented the family of the deceased, told me the case wouldn't go to the jury."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 2000
Do you really want to go back and relive the whole O.J. Simpson mess? That's the question you should ask yourself before sitting down tomorrow night for the start of the four-hour CBS miniseries, "American Tragedy," starring Ron Silver, Ving Rhames, Christopher Plummer and Bruno Kirby. Despite the pretentious title and taint of sleaze associated with treating such material in an entertainment format, "American Tragedy" is not without merit. It's just that once you dip your toe back in these waters and let yourself flow with the narrative tide, you end the viewing experience feeling like you really, really need a long, hot shower with lots of soap.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
One night on the 11 o'clock news:11:00: Breezy opening theme. Splashy photo montage of city skyline interspersed with footage of Instant Action News team at work: anchorman in shirt sleeves striding confidently through the newsroom, anchorwoman typing furiously at computer, weatherman poring over charts, sports guy interviewing star point guard on basketball team.Horns rise to crescendo. Off-camera voice of God intones: "This is Instant Action News!"11:01: Uh-oh, anchorman looks grim. There's been a shooting.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1999
The lawyer representing Barry W. Hamilton, the Baltimore policeman who shot a 21-year-old man in the back of the head last week, said yesterday the investigation into the incident has become a politically motivated mockery and vowed his client will be vindicated.Henry Belsky, the lawyer for the Fraternal Order of Police who is representing Hamilton, said the sheer number of inquiries is unprecedented and threatens his client's ability to get a fair and impartial investigation."It's crazy.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 14, 1996
JOHNNIE Cochran spoke last night at UMBC. He was everything I thought he'd be, only shorter.Also, he wore a dark suit when I had my heart set on the famous Cochran lavender or maybe even (dared I hope it?) periwinkle.The tie was suitably bright, though. And the handkerchief matched.And so did the talk.Oh, he can talk the talk.Which is why his man, O. J. Simpson, got to walk the walk.Cochran said it himself: "There's no doubt in my mind that if Mr. Simpson didn't have the resources he had, he'd be in prison right now."
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