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April 14, 2006
April 14 1865: President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while at Ford's Theatre in Washington.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
I'd like to go to church this morning, Pentecost and all that, but there are all those people circling the house, pounding feebly at the door, and pleading for the answers to yesterday's quiz on word nerdiness. Here you are: the original ten sentences, the identification of the problems they present, and a note on scoring your nerdity at the end.    1. A rapidly developing drought and unseasonably hot weather throughout Maryland has stolen the early promise of this year's wet spring, parching lawns and gardens and raising fears among farmers of a return to the disastrously dry years of the mid-1980s.     Subject-verb agreement: drought and weather constitute a compound subject, so the verb has to be have stolen .    2. Although boys do get lice, they tend to prefer females.
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NEWS
July 3, 2005
On July 31, 1861, 300 Union troops marched to Bel Air to arrest pacifists and Southern sympathizers and to seize arms. One of their targets was Herman Stump, but he was warned by John Wilkes Booth. The Historical Society of Harford County
NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 9, 2013
50 Years Ago Let's see a movie An ad in the Times was a movie listing for the Edmonson Drive-In: "Wed, thru. Tues. Frank Sinatra in 'Come Blow Your Horn'; Richard Burton in 'Bramble Bush'; added feature Fri & Sat. Elizabeth Taylor in 'Giant'. " The Edmonson Drive-In on Route 40 in Catonsville closed in 1991, but it had a 43-year run was a popular spot for Howard countians too, especially for Baby Boomers on date nights. It was also included in John Waters' flick, "Polyester.
NEWS
October 4, 2001
A tour of historic graves in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday inside the gates at Greenmount Avenue and East Oliver Street. Baltimore public school teacher Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk that includes stops at the graves of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth and merchant philanthropists Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt and William Walters. The tour will be repeated each Saturday through the end of the month. The event is held rain or shine. Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling 410-256-2180.
NEWS
May 5, 2000
A tour of historic graves and Victorian monuments in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9: 30 a.m. tomorrow at Greenmount Avenue and Oliver Street. Teacher and historian Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk past the resting places of famous persons, including Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt, John Wilkes Booth and William Walters. The tour will be repeated May 20, May 27 and June 3. The cost is $10 per person. Reservations: 410-256-2180.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Richard D. Mudd, 101, who spent much of his life trying to overturn his grandfather's conviction on charges of aiding Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, died Tuesday at his home in Saginaw, Mich. Mr. Mudd, who retired in 1965 after 37 years as a physician for General Motors Corp., traveled the nation on speaking engagements, many of them before Civil War historical organizations. He spent decades trying to clear the name of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who treated Booth after the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Washington's Ford's Theater.
NEWS
October 22, 1994
Kaleria Fedicheva, 58, a former ballerina with the Kirov Ballet in Leningrad who later taught dance in the United States, died of cancer on Sept. 13 in New York. She was a peer of Rudolf Nureyev, Natalia Makarova and Mikhail Baryshnikov.Harrison Humphries, 78, a retired Associated Press reporter, died Saturday of Parkinson's disease in Washington. He was a great-nephew of Dr. Samuel Mudd, the doctor who set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
1891: Edwin Booth's last performance On April 4, 1891, after nearly 42 years onstage, Edwin Thomas Booth, one of the best-loved American Shakespearean actors of the last half of the 19th century, gave his final performance. Afterward, there were so many waving admirers outside of the Brooklyn Academy of Music that police had to clear a way for Booth's carriage. Edwin Booth, famed for the role of Hamlet, was born Nov. 13, 1833, in a log farmhouse near Bel Air, where in 1822 Edwin's father, English actor Junius Brutus Booth, had established a summer home.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | April 9, 2006
In 1999, the auction of Tudor Hall, the childhood home of John Wilkes Booth in Bel Air, attracted more than 100 people, including an Abraham Lincoln lookalike and a throng of national media representatives. Last week, when the Gothic-style house on 8 acres was up for auction again, the buzz was barely audible. At the gathering of about 25 people at the auction Thursday were more observers than bidders, and the house did not sell. With two officially registered bidders, the price started at $875,000 and quickly dropped until it hit what auctioneer Aimee C. O'Neill dubbed an "unacceptable" price floor of $805,000.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 22, 2013
Rand Paul is the most interesting contender for the Republican nomination. And when I say interesting, I mean that in the broadest sense. A case in point: The Kentucky senator recently hit some turbulence when the Washington Free Beacon reported that Jack Hunter, Mr. Paul's aide and the coauthor of his book, "The Tea Party Goes to Washington," was once the Southern Avenger. Who's that? Starting in the 1990s, as a radio shock jock, Mr. Hunter would wear a wrestling mask made from a Confederate flag, while making jokes about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and having the South re-secede.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | June 7, 2013
Harford County, situated 25 miles north of Baltimore and nestled against the northwestern shores of the Chesapeake Bay, boasts a blend of history and modern living. Spanning 440 square miles of the Baltimore/Washington Metro area, it has a population of nearly 250,000. The three largest incorporated municipalities in the county are Aberdeen, Havre de Grace and the town of Bel Air, which also is the county seat. Even with a growing population, Harford County retains its rural charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Harford County's most notorious native son has been exhumed theatrically. "The Booth Project," an experimental work about Lincoln's assassin premiering this week at the Theatre Project , is the brainchild of Baltimore native Ryan Clark. So is the company performing it - Quarry Theatre Clark returned to the area about three years ago from New York City, where he held posts with a theater company and a performing arts high school. He has been teaching at Harford Community College and Towson University, and will soon join the faculty at the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
In the shadow of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia, John Wilkes Booth will tell anyone who'll listen just why that tyrant had to be assassinated. Supporting himself on a wooden crutch, a decidedly agitated Booth, his voice rising to match the fierceness in his eyes, rants about the war and how it ended. "My genteel South, gone," he says, seemingly on the verge of a sob. He goes on to relate the events of that night at Ford's Theatre, the leap from the presidential box and the escape through Maryland that eventually led him to a barn in Virginia, surrounded by Union troops.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
Growing up on a Kansas farm, Dinah Faber fell in love with history - specifically, the history of Western rogues such as Billy the Kid and Jesse James. So when Faber, a freelance writer and historian, moved with her husband to Maryland in 1995, it was only natural that she would fall for one of the most famous - and infamous - families Harford County has produced. Known these days as "the Booth Lady," Faber has spent the past 13 years researching the clan of Junius Brutus Booth (1796-1852)
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Thank you for Cassandra Fortin's story of Dec. 30, 2007, on the History Channel documentary of John Wilkes Booth and the assassination of President Lincoln. The program will do a lot to bring attention to one of Maryland's many unique historic and heritage areas. I would like to mention that the Maryland Office of Tourism Development has produced a map guide titled "John Wilkes Booth: Escape of an Assassin, War on the Chesapeake" that your readers can use to follow in his footsteps. Sites on the map guide include Ford's Theatre, Surratt House Museum and Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House Museum.
NEWS
May 27, 1995
As evidence that John Wilkes Booth's family believed he was killed in 1865, Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan cited this letter from John's brother, Edwin Booth. It was written July 28, 1881, to a friend, Nahum Capen:"I can give you very little information regarding my brother John. I seldom saw him since his early boyhood in Baltimore. He was a rattle-pated fellow, filled with Quixotic notions. While at the farm in Maryland he would charge on horseback through the woods, 'spouting' heroic speeches with a lance in his hand, a relic of the Mexican War, given to Father by some soldier who had served under [Zachary]
NEWS
December 2, 2007
John Wilkes Booth shot a man who may have been dying of thyroid cancer. A particular genetic disorder leads inevitably to such an end, and though it is extremely rare, is it possible that it afflicted Abraham Lincoln? And was his declining health in early 1865 a sign that he was on death's doorstep? Last week, in a lecture hall at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dr. John Sotos presented his hypothesis that Lincoln suffered from a syndrome, called MEN 2B, that would explain his unusual lanky build, his chronic constipation, his hooded eyes and droopy face, his asymmetric jaw and the benign lumps on his lips.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | February 18, 2007
Alice Williams sat in the Historical Society of Harford County, leafing through old court records. As she read the legal documents, she discovered an arrest warrant with John Wilkes Booth's name on it. "Is this our John Booth?" asked Williams, 85, of Havre de Grace. Dinah Faber, a Booth historian, looked at the document and then left the room. She returned with a document that chronicled the incident. "This warrant confirms the story that Booth hit a man with a stick," said Faber. "Until now, all we had was a letter written by Booth and a story in his sister's book to document the incident.
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