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NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | June 30, 1994
Akron, Ohio -- It was not the kind of conference I am used to. This was a gathering where murmurs of enthusiasm greeted questions asked about ''Yak'' Canutt or Hank Worden. It was as if old friends were being remembered.I was at a ''Big Trail'' meeting, a celebration of the 10th year of publication for the sponsoring magazine, also called The Big Trail. This newsletter keeps John Wayne fans informed of all things connected with their hero.On a Friday workday, more than 400 people had paid the conference fees to see rare movies, talk to Wayne's widow and trade Wayne memorabilia.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Ray May doesn't go out much. It's hard to get around when both of your hips are shot, and your legs go numb, and you need a cane, maybe two, to walk. Nine years of playing professional football wore him down. At 68, May - a starting linebacker on the Baltimore Colts' 1971 Super Bowl championship team - will need multiple surgeries to regain his footing. "Hobbling everywhere you go is as demeaning as it gets," he said from his home in Los Angeles. "Right now, I'm fighting with the NFL [to help pay for]
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 30, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:THE WAYNE MAN -- American movie icon John Wayne is the subject of "Standing Tall," a profile airing at 11 tonight on Maryland Public Television (channels 22 and 67). It's hosted by television's own western legend, James ("Gunsmoke") Arness. (See movie item below for a couple Wayne classics which can be seen over the weekend.)ART IMITATING REALITY? -- Talk about ironic programming. Earlier this month ABC announced that "Going Places" was going nowhere further, and canceled the show-within-a-show series about four young TV producers (Heather Locklear, Alan Ruck, Jerry Levine and Hallie Todd)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
The father-son owners of Carol's Western Wear in Glen Burnie are so attached to the legend of John Wayne that they know his boot size and preference for plain brown with a squared-off toe. They will mark the 105 t h birthday of America's well-known cowboy Saturday with a storewide sale that includes everything from alarm clocks and mugs with the Duke's image to several nearly 6-foot tall cut-outs of the actor in full-Western regalia....
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | August 27, 1995
I was browsing through the fall catalog of a mail-order house that sells movies on videocassette. Though the 123-page booklet was mostly divided up by subject matter - "Action," "Great Couples," "Family Movies" - a dozen or so famous names were given sections of their own: Clark Gable and Robert De Niro had a quarter-page each, Alfred Hitchcock a column, Audrey Hepburn a page. But only one star got two whole pages all to himself. Tom Hanks? Bogart? Fred Astaire? Nope. It was John Wayne.Sixteen years after his death, the most popular movie star of the century remains exactly what he was throughout the second half of his life: a universal symbol of what America means to itself.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 18, 2007
In John Wayne's best-loved non-Western, John Ford's 1952 The Quiet Man, he plays a boxer afraid of his own strength because he once killed a man in the ring. He does one of the slowest burns in film history, expressing the splutter with a hitch in his rolling walk and the way he dispatches a butt like a spear to the ground as if to say he finally means business. And his reluctance to be violent makes him likable, even noble. Look beneath the weathered surface and raucous high jinks of Wayne's trademark Westerns, and even the tortured complexities of Howard Hawks' Red River (1948)
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1996
"John Wayne's America: The Politics of Celebrity," by Garry Wills. Simon and Schuster. 289 pages. $26.This latest book by Garry Wills, like many of the author's other works, is unclassifiable. It is at once history, sociology, a chronicle of Hollywood films and the life of an actor - all of these, and none of them. It might be considered the biography of an idea.While Abraham Lincoln rallied the nation around the eloquence of his Gettysburg Address, Garry Wills suggests that John Wayne became an American icon, due in part, to his inarticulateness.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
Dribs and drabs from the notebookBaltimore's own "Black Elvis" is hitting the big time.Well, not exactly, but he is appearing on next weekend's Children's Miracle Network Telethon on WMAR, Channel 2. Money raised during the telethon benefits Johns Hopkins' Children's Center.Baltimore's Black Elvis (a k a Tony Dee) -- not to be confused with other Black Elvises from other cities -- is scheduled to perform on the telethon Saturday between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m.And if you watch, keep in mind what the King himself would say if he knew: "Thank you. Thank you very much."
TRAVEL
By Brian Downes and By Brian Downes,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2000
In "Cinema Southwest," a comprehensive guide to Western movies and their locations, author John A. Murray writes: "We can imagine a Southwest without Bryce Canyon, or even without Zion, just as we can imagine a person without an arm or a leg, but a Southwest without Monument Valley is inconceivable." As mysterious as it is majestic, the harsh and desolate terrain that straddles the Arizona-Utah border some 20 miles north of Kayenta, Ariz., is -- thanks hugely to the classic Westerns of filmmaker John Ford -- the most recognizable landscape in the entire West.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 11, 1994
President Mandela thinks that every living South African belongs there. Such talk wouldn't go in Serbia or Rwanda or parts of this country.Not that John Wayne Gacy should not have been executed. But of every 100 who are, usually none is a John Wayne Gacy and at least one is a mistake.The Southern Yemen army and the Northern Yemen army have declared war on the people of Yemen.Be patriotic. Bet the store on the Preakness, whatever is left over after all those Lotto tickets.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | September 15, 2011
They are auctioning Elizabeth Taylor's jewels at Christie's in New York in December, and they expect the finest of them — about 260 pieces — to bring in some $30 million. But that's just a tiny part of what she left behind. In October, the estate of John Wayne — responding to fan requests that remain strong since his death more than 30 years ago — is auctioning off some of the large collection of movie memorabilia it holds. Everything from his Golden Globe for "True Grit" to the eye patch he wore in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 28, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles  • A flake mistake? Bachmann mixes up John Wayne and John Wayne Gacy. ( Washington Times )  • We didn't do it! We swear: TSA changing story on removing 95-year-old woman's diaper. ( CNN )  • Thought crime:  Blago convicted in retrial.
NEWS
October 13, 2007
KISHO KUROKAWA, 73 Noted architect Kisho Kurokawa, an architect known for designs that merge traditional architecture styles and philosophy, died of heart failure yesterday morning, said Keiko Yamazaki, spokeswoman at the Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, where he was hospitalized Tuesday with an intestinal ailment. The spokeswoman said no other details would be released because of privacy reasons. News reports said Mr. Kurokawa was suffering from a liver ailment. Mr. Kurokawa, who made his world debut in 1960 at age 26, led a style known as the Metabolism Movement, advocating a shift from "machine principle" to "life principle" in his literary work and architectural designs based on themes including ecology, recycling and intermediate space.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 18, 2007
In John Wayne's best-loved non-Western, John Ford's 1952 The Quiet Man, he plays a boxer afraid of his own strength because he once killed a man in the ring. He does one of the slowest burns in film history, expressing the splutter with a hitch in his rolling walk and the way he dispatches a butt like a spear to the ground as if to say he finally means business. And his reluctance to be violent makes him likable, even noble. Look beneath the weathered surface and raucous high jinks of Wayne's trademark Westerns, and even the tortured complexities of Howard Hawks' Red River (1948)
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Anageles Times | November 7, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Peter Bogdanovich's rarely screened 1971 documentary Directed by John Ford has taken on almost mythic proportions over the decades. Narrated by Bogdanovich's good friend, director Orson Welles, the film featured interviews with the crusty, cantankerous Oscar-winning Ford as well as John Wayne, Henry Fonda and Jimmy Stewart, who had appeared in many of Ford's films. Directed by John Ford airs at 8 and 11:30 tonight on Turner Classic Movies.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2006
Why don't they make stars like James Cagney or John Wayne anymore? It's partly because they don't make Americans like Cagney or Wayne anymore. We've become too self-conscious - maybe even too camera-conscious - as well as too polarized and fragmented. Without even trying, these stars represented things about their country in the way they walked or smoked or set off fireworks. Cagney stood for urban American drive and sass and gumption. Wayne became a walking dream of easy Western confidence and fortitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
By From Staff Reports | January 20, 1995
Don't think of this as a recommendation. It's a warning, if you like.John Wayne Bobbitt's X-rated flick "John Wayne Bobbitt Uncut" is in town. Mr. Bobbitt, whose sex organ was reattached after his wife cut it off with a kitchen knife, reportedly has been earning $2 for every copy sold of the popular "Uncut" video, in addition to the $50,000 he got to make the movie.The movie is playing at the Apex Adult Cinema at 110 S.Broadway. Call (410) 276-0671 for information.
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Paul Malvern, 91, a Hollywood stuntman who became the producer of more than 100 films, including many of John Wayne's early westerns, died May 29 in Los Angeles. More than 75 of Mr. Malvern's films were westerns, including the 1930s films "Westward Ho."
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2006
The Bette Davis Collection, Vol. 2 [Warner] $60 This set includes three new to video - Marked Woman (1937), The Man Who Came to Dinner (1941) and Old Acquaintance (1943) and spiffed-up versions of previously released Jezebel (1938) and What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). Rounding out the disc is the documentary Stardust: The Bette Davis Story. Marked Woman is a hard-hitting melodrama loosely based on the life of gangster Lucky Luciano, who was imprisoned after prostitutes who worked in one of his brothels informed on him. Humphrey Bogart also stars.
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