Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Updike
IN THE NEWS

John Updike

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | December 23, 1994
"The Biblical Language for Relationships" is the subject of a two-day conference to be held next month at Baltimore's Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation.The public is invited.The program is being arranged in conjunction with a televised seminar in New York that includes discussions with novelist John Updike.The cathedral on University Parkway, between Charles and St. Paul streets, is one of two broadcast sites in Maryland and more than 80 across the nation where there will be opportunities for interaction with the participants in New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PULE Whining is an annoying tone that gets on the nerves, and the British whinge , at least to my ear, is whining with a little more edge to it. But that's not the end of it. You may find your irritation rising as well at puling . To pule (pronounced PYOOL)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | May 23, 1993
COLLECTED POEMS: 1953-1993.John Updike.Knopf.` 387 pages. $27.50.Shocking! Yes, even happiness can be shocking. What right does a famous contemporary novelist, essayist and poet have to call himself happy? Are not all our writers sacred pariahs, branded and damned by a cruelly materialistic culture? And yet John Updike has said in his memoir, "Self-Consciousness," that he is "an amiable, reasonable, interested, generally healthy, HTC sexually normal, dependable, hopeful, fortunate human being."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
Jaimy Gordon says she was a student at Antioch College when John Updike's "The Centaur" taught her that a writer could use "outsized metaphors" and still wield "the power to keep people interested because they need to know what happens in a book. It's the most powerful tool for any writer of narrative fiction. Who in his or her right mind would relinquish it?" In 1964, Updike won the National Book Award for "The Centaur," his third novel. In 2010, Gordon won the National Book Award for her fourth novel, "Lord of Misrule.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
Terrorist John Updike Alfred A. Knopf / 310 pages / $25 The question consumes us, especially since Sept. 11: Who are these terrorists eager to blow up thousands of strangers - and themselves? Who would embrace the unimaginable pain of that kind of death for even a few seconds, becoming merely a splash of blood, a few bits of bone, a sprinkling of ash? In pained bewilderment, we imagine suicide bombers as nearly subhuman, seared by hate and incapable of empathy. Those questions must have haunted the writer John Updike.
NEWS
January 29, 2009
The death of John Updike, a brilliant, nuanced and tireless chronicler of ordinary life in America, makes us wonder what Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom would do in the economic crisis now changing the course of millions of lives. Rabbit is Mr. Updike's novelistic everyman whose dreams, crude vanities and fears held up a mirror to our world through four decades. In Rabbit at Rest, Mr. Updike imagines his protagonist, a Pennsylvania car dealer retired to Florida, brooding in the final year of Ronald Regan's presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
The Rabbit is finally at rest. Author John Updike, who died Tuesday of lung cancer at age 76, frequently referred to his most indelible character, Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, as his alter-ego. In four novels - Rabbit, Run, Rabbit Redux, Rabbit Is Rich and Rabbit at Rest - Updike chronicled his blue-collar protagonist adrift and disillusioned in mid-20th-century America. The books begin respectively in 1959, 1969, 1979 and 1988, and encapsulate the conflicts of their previous decades: the disenchantment with the American dream of the '50s, the Vietnam War and the hippie movement in the '60s, the conspicuous consumption and hedonism of the '70s, and the rise of drugs and AIDS in the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 8, 2000
William H. Pritchard, in his recent "Updike: America's Man of Letters" (Steerforth Press, 351 pages, $27), reports that he usually recommends "Of the Farm" as the place to begin reading John Updike's work. Along with one other novel, by Saul Bellow ("Seize the Day," 1956), he calls it "a distinct literary triumph that stands out from anything produced by American fictional contemporaries, mid-century and after" -- a work of "genius." It was written in 1965, published by Knopf. I believe I read it about then, though I don't quite remember it. I believe I have read much, perhaps almost all, of Updike, but I lack one of those wonderful minds that grasps forever great reading experiences.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Due Considerations By John Updike Knopf / 736 pages / $32 Some writers are acquired tastes - the literary versions of anchovies and smelly cheeses. Others are staples - the bread and milk of the literary larder. John Updike is somehow both: so prolific as to be a staple, so frequently arcane as to be an acquired taste. His latest collection of essays and criticism, Due Considerations, is well over 700 pages and contains literary musings on everything but the kitchen sink (although the piece on the longevity of Coco Chanel or the one on coins vs. paper money might qualify as a metaphoric kitchen sink)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 17, 2002
John Updike's 20th novel, Seek My Face (Knopf, 288 pages, $23), takes place during a single, long day -- as did The Poorhouse Fair, his first novel, published in 1959. Though the events occur between one morning and evening in 1998, the narrative sweeps the consciousness of Hope Chafetz from when she was 5 or 6 years old until she is 78. She was brought up in Germantown, an old Philadelphia neighborhood, by a lapsing Quaker father and an Episcopalian mother: "Old stock -- Quaker, Yankee, Western pioneer, Protestant."
NEWS
February 4, 2009
Will Phelps squander his public esteem? Of course Michael Phelps deserves a break. But the mere fact that we are having this discussion diminishes him, and that is a problem of his own making ("Not a big deal?" Feb. 3). His acknowledgment of his mistake and acts of contrition (and community service) were perfect after his DUI incident four years ago. They stood apart from the usual athletic "apologies" of the day (which typically took the form of "I'm sorry you were offended by what I did" instead of "I'm sorry for what I did")
NEWS
January 29, 2009
The death of John Updike, a brilliant, nuanced and tireless chronicler of ordinary life in America, makes us wonder what Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom would do in the economic crisis now changing the course of millions of lives. Rabbit is Mr. Updike's novelistic everyman whose dreams, crude vanities and fears held up a mirror to our world through four decades. In Rabbit at Rest, Mr. Updike imagines his protagonist, a Pennsylvania car dealer retired to Florida, brooding in the final year of Ronald Regan's presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
The Rabbit is finally at rest. Author John Updike, who died Tuesday of lung cancer at age 76, frequently referred to his most indelible character, Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, as his alter-ego. In four novels - Rabbit, Run, Rabbit Redux, Rabbit Is Rich and Rabbit at Rest - Updike chronicled his blue-collar protagonist adrift and disillusioned in mid-20th-century America. The books begin respectively in 1959, 1969, 1979 and 1988, and encapsulate the conflicts of their previous decades: the disenchantment with the American dream of the '50s, the Vietnam War and the hippie movement in the '60s, the conspicuous consumption and hedonism of the '70s, and the rise of drugs and AIDS in the '80s.
NEWS
By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2009
John Updike, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction whose novels and short stories exposed an undercurrent of ambivalence and disappointment in small-town, middle-class America, died yesterday. He was 76. Mr. Updike's death from lung cancer was announced by Nicholas Latimer of Alfred A. Knopf, his publisher. Mr. Updike was a resident of Beverly Farms, Mass., but the announcement did not indicate where he died. In a career spanning half a century, Mr. Updike published more than 50 books, more than 20 of them novels, and countless short stories, as well as collections of poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
The Widows of Eastwick By John Updike Knopf / 320 pages / $24.95 It's been 30 years since the three witches haunted the sleepy town of Eastwick, R.I., under the tutelage of the devil incarnate, Darryl Van Horne. In their prime, the three divorcees teased lovers, taunted rivals, explored their sexual and mystical powers and lounged around in Horne's hot tub. But even witches grow old. Do they still have what it takes to make magic? John Updike, one of America's greatest living novelists, reprises the memorable characters from The Witches of Eastwick - Alexandra, Jane and Sukie - in this story about the need to cling to life in the face of deterioration and death.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Due Considerations By John Updike Knopf / 736 pages / $32 Some writers are acquired tastes - the literary versions of anchovies and smelly cheeses. Others are staples - the bread and milk of the literary larder. John Updike is somehow both: so prolific as to be a staple, so frequently arcane as to be an acquired taste. His latest collection of essays and criticism, Due Considerations, is well over 700 pages and contains literary musings on everything but the kitchen sink (although the piece on the longevity of Coco Chanel or the one on coins vs. paper money might qualify as a metaphoric kitchen sink)
NEWS
By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2009
John Updike, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction whose novels and short stories exposed an undercurrent of ambivalence and disappointment in small-town, middle-class America, died yesterday. He was 76. Mr. Updike's death from lung cancer was announced by Nicholas Latimer of Alfred A. Knopf, his publisher. Mr. Updike was a resident of Beverly Farms, Mass., but the announcement did not indicate where he died. In a career spanning half a century, Mr. Updike published more than 50 books, more than 20 of them novels, and countless short stories, as well as collections of poetry.
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | March 29, 2004
John Updike, already among the most honored of contemporary literary writers, has received yet another prize. He was named the winner Monday of the PEN/Faulkner award for fiction. Updike was cited for "The Early Stories," a compilation of short fiction from 1953-1975. He will receive $15,000. "Story after story has that moment of a deftly-rendered revelation, subtle and astonishing, that honest recognition of who we are," PEN/Faulkner judge Elizabeth Strout said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
July 1, 2007
Terrorist By John Updike Updike's chilling novel knits together his familiar preoccupations - sex, death, religion. In a slumping New Jersey factory town, 18-year-old Ahmad Mulloy, half-Irish, half-Egyptian, is intoxicated by Islamic radicalism. Prodded by an ambiguous Yemeni imam, Ahmad becomes part of a deadly plot, and it falls to a weary high school counselor to try to pull him back from the edge.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
Terrorist John Updike Alfred A. Knopf / 310 pages / $25 The question consumes us, especially since Sept. 11: Who are these terrorists eager to blow up thousands of strangers - and themselves? Who would embrace the unimaginable pain of that kind of death for even a few seconds, becoming merely a splash of blood, a few bits of bone, a sprinkling of ash? In pained bewilderment, we imagine suicide bombers as nearly subhuman, seared by hate and incapable of empathy. Those questions must have haunted the writer John Updike.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.