Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Travolta
IN THE NEWS

John Travolta

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
A slimmed-down Edna Turnblad shared the stage with her creator, John Waters, last night, much to the delight of scores of star-crazed fans. Well, it wasn't exactly Edna, the zaftig stage mom from Waters' "Hairspray," who took to the stage at the Maryland Institute College of Art . Rather, it was actor John Travolta, who brought Edna to the big screen in the 2007 musical version of Waters' film, up there on the stage. But the crowd embraced him like one of their own. "You've always been my favorite actor," one fan said from the audience, noting that she spent her teen years with pictures of Travolta plastered to her wall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
A slimmed-down Edna Turnblad shared the stage with her creator, John Waters, last night, much to the delight of scores of star-crazed fans. Well, it wasn't exactly Edna, the zaftig stage mom from Waters' "Hairspray," who took to the stage at the Maryland Institute College of Art . Rather, it was actor John Travolta, who brought Edna to the big screen in the 2007 musical version of Waters' film, up there on the stage. But the crowd embraced him like one of their own. "You've always been my favorite actor," one fan said from the audience, noting that she spent her teen years with pictures of Travolta plastered to her wall.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
In morality tales, the hero usually slides down some slippery ethical slope, suffers, and then climbs back up to the high ground after an over-dramatic epiphany. In "Lucky Numbers," though, all bets are off (pun fully intended). This darkly funny modern immorality fable with John Travolta as the altruistic, all-American-as-Boy-Scouts protagonist has a twist that preaches a tenet more along the lines of Wall Street's "Greed is good" - especially if you can get away with it. Directed by Nora Ephron (responsible for Meg Ryan vehicles "Sleepless in Seattle" and "You've Got Mail")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
John Travolta knew what he wanted to do with the role of Edna Turnblad, the zaftig housewife at the center of "Hairspray. " The movie's producers, however, weren't so sure. Especially when he insisted on using a Bawlamer accent. "I got fought on it, by everyone," Travolta says over the phone from his home in Florida, recalling his efforts to put his own stamp on the character. "Finally, I said to them, 'Look, I don't have to do this movie. This is a lark. Either you let me do it with my interpretation, which includes the Baltimore accent … or let's just not do it.'" Not surprisingly, Travolta got his way - when you're a big-time movie star, producers generally like to keep you happy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1996
One look at John Travolta's funky hipster angel in "Michael" and you may indeed come to believe that it's a wonderful life -- if not permanently, at least for the amount of time you share with Travolta.The conceit is delicious. Think of Leon Redbone or Tom Waits or Dexter Gordon or maybe the tubby, slovenly late-middle-aged Jack Kerouac hung with a set of wings that could guide a !B Tomcat onto a carrier deck. Think of a gravely voice, sleepy eyes, a spray of whiskers from an injudiciously applied razor.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley got his big Hollywood break yesterday, but his first role in a feature film was not much of a stretch. O'Malley portrayed the Mayor in the Touchstone Pictures drama Ladder 49, which stars John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix. The scene shot yesterday portrayed a ceremony at the War Memorial Building on Gay Street and featured the mayor and 516 extras. "I never came out of character," O'Malley said of a performance that garnered him membership in the Screen Actors Guild and a one-day paycheck of $650.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 9, 1996
Who put the bam in the rama-dama-slam bam? Who put the boom in the bing-bang-boom-boom? Who put the yow in the wow-pow-yow-yow? Woo, that's who!I wax anti-poetic, but this is a way to express the following reality: With "Broken Arrow," the great Hong Kong filmmaker John Woo not merely becomes a fully fledged American director, but finds a way to harness his remarkable dynamism and power to American story traditions and cultural norms, and all but reinvents the...
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1997
In the margins where Eddie and Maureen exist, no one's surprised when bad things occur. Maureen is raped, and Eddie is clubbed on the head, and both of them barely register that anything has happened to them. Their eyes are glazed as if their thoughts are focused elsewhere.That they are. On each other. Fixedly. Unswervingly. Passionately. They are fully alive only with each other. Everything else is extraneous and disposable. Everything. Money, home, children. All that matters is being in the spotlight of the other's gaze.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
All week long, young and old, they've come to Middle River to pay homage to Vinnie Barbarino of television's Sweathogs fame. Or Danny Zuko from the movie Grease. But mostly it was, in the collective mind's eye of the fans who lined up daily by the hundreds on Old Eastern Avenue, the swaggering dancing machine Tony Manero in Saturday Night Fever. John Travolta is at the creaky but venerable Commodore bar and meeting hall this week filming Ladder 49, a tale of Baltimore firefighters, their triumphs and their foibles.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Down at the venerable Commodore bar and meeting hall in Middle River, the proprietors are preparing to go Hollywood. And already, there are whispers along the Baltimore County waterfront. "No, I did not buy my wife her new turquoise Thunderbird convertible just because our place will be in a big movie production," said Roger Zajdel, honing his new-found humility from his brush with fame. The Commodore Hall, which has stood since 1912 as a popular watering hole, movie theater, banquet hall and political gathering spot, will be featured in the Disney movie Ladder 49, which is being filmed in the Baltimore area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Oscar-nominated actor John Travolta will sit down for a public conversation with John Waters at Baltimore's Maryland Institute College of Art . The man who created Edna Turnblad and the actor who brought the zaftig housewife of "Hairspray" to full-throated life on the big screen will be appearing together in Baltimore next month. Oscar-nominated actor John Travolta, whose film roles have included star turns in "Saturday Night Fever," "Grease," "Pulp Fiction" and the musical version of "Hairspray," will sit down for a public conversation with John Waters, the unregenerate bad-boy director responsible for "Hairspray" in the first place.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Sarah Finlayson's morning routine is fairly set. Wake up early. Workout with a trainer. Call her twin sister.  Picking up a hitchhiking John Waters? That's not part of it. Yet the minister's wife from Baltimore stopped her Lexus for the filmmaker and gets the credit for launching his cross-country hitchhiking journey. Finlayson, who's a 59-year-old wife and mother, was driving down Charles Street, heading home from her workout and chatting on the car phone with her twin sister who lives in Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Baltimore loves "Grease," so Paramount has brought it here in a "sing-along" edition. At least that's the studio's story. For weeks it's been running an online promotion asking fans of the 1978 musical smash to vote for it to come to their city. With 1,414 demands to date — whoops, I just checked, make that 1,415 — Baltimore has ranked #3 in requests for the film out of 3,617 markets in the running. "Grease" opens Friday at the Cinemark Egyptian . It's the perfect midsummer gift for hons who wanted to sashay like the Pink Ladies or be good and look great in leather like Olivia Newton-John.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune newspapers | February 5, 2010
"From Paris With Love" doesn't do much for Paris or love, or your brain cells, but it flies like a crazed eagle on uppers and comes from the talented, propulsive Pierre Morel. A former cinematographer who learned under the tutelage of international violence impresario Luc Besson, Morel turns his kinetic eye to a tale (story by Besson, script by Adi Hasak) of a low-level spy and Paris embassy functionary, played by Jonathan Rhys Meyers. He lives a fine life in Paris with his fiancee (Kasia Smutniak)
FEATURES
June 19, 2009
The Hangover * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) $32.7 million $104.7 million 2 weeks Rated: R Running time: 100 minutes What it's about: A group of friends (including Zach Galifianakis, above) struggle to piece together what happened after an out-of-control Vegas bachelor party. Our take: This relentlessly jocular movie is designed to deliver lower-belly laughs with sleek contemporary efficiency. Up **** ( 4 STARS) $30.7 million $187.4 million 3 weeks Rated: PG Running time: 96 minutes What it's about: A 78-year-old widower (above)
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 29, 2008
'Hairspray' sequel won't have John Travolta kicking up his heels anymore Hold onto your beehives, Baltimore, John Travolta says he won't reprise his role as Edna Turnblad in the Hairspray sequel. "I think once is enough," Travolta, 54, told the Sunday Herald Sun of Sydney, Australia. "I did it and I did it well, but I'm not a big sequel guy." That's not what Perez Hilton recalls. On his Web site he notes these Travolta films: Look Who's Talking Too and Staying Alive. The Hairspray sequel, written by John Waters, is projected for a summer 2010 release.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
"Should I write down that I'm a masseuse?" Diana Duda asked, hoping to sear herself into the memory of the casting director who had inspected dozens of potential movie extras and had hundreds more to go. Casting director Marshall Peck smiled politely at her before he began to quickly size up the next person in line. Duda and more than 1,200 others crowded into the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University yesterday to attend a casting call for extras in the movie Ladder 49, a firefighting drama to be shot in Baltimore from the middle of this month through July.
FEATURES
July 27, 2007
John Travolta stars as a woman in John Water's Hairspray, which opened nationally last week. What was the last Travolta movie you saw and liked? Why? WHAT YOU SAY Although I realize John Travolta has been in many movies before Hairspray, both musical and nonmusical, I still feel my very favorite is Saturday Night Fever. His extraordinary good looks and extreme talent were certainly assets in making that particular movie a memorable one for me. Freda Garelick, Baltimore THE NEXT QUESTION The Simpsons Movie comes out today.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 1, 2008
Not a single Oscar nomination for Hairspray? Something's not right here. No disrespect to the five Best Picture contenders, but Hairspray was more fun and displayed more energy than any of them. This musical ode to the transcendent joys of dance and desegregation in early-'60s Baltimore was a pure joy that, at last count, had left nearly $119 million's worth of audience with a song in its collective heart, a tap in its feet and a smile on its face. Hairspray director Adam Shankman deserved an Oscar nod for making an old-fashioned, big-hearted movie musical that modern audiences could flock to. Nikki Blonsky deserves some recognition for coming out of nowhere to make a new generation of audiences fall in love with the effervescent and unflaggingly optimistic Tracy Turnblad.
FEATURES
August 24, 2007
THE QUESTION Of the movies you watched this summer, which do you think are Academy Award contenders and why? WHAT YOU SAY The movie that will "walk off" with an Oscar in the category of musical/comedy will be Hairspray, excelling as both a musical and a comedy. From the opening shot of quintessential Baltimore neighborhoods, we are hooked, taken back in time and thoroughly entertained for the remainder of our stay. Director Adam Shankman cleverly opens with a close up of Nikki Blonsky's eyes, immediately engaging us to this talented young woman.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.