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John Taylor

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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
The Kinderman waits for about 200 kids to plant their bottoms on their puffy, nylon jackets on the floor of a converted barn in Columbia.For now, they keep their distance from the big man in the black derby, suspenders, high-tops and cummerbund. But they can't stop staring at this cross between Raffi and Don King."HELLO, I'M THE KINDERMAN," John Taylor announces, as a drum machine beats throughout his 45-minute show. He sings, "I'm very glad I came today, I'm very glad I came."Then he moves his body, an apparatus victimized by hotel food but still graceful.
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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
After convincing his mostly preschool audience to chant, "Dance, Kinderman, dance" a few times, John Taylor pretended to timidly oblige. But he cleverly surprised his young spectators when he flamboyantly cocked his right hip and unleashed a sample of the flashy footwork and smooth moves that long ago earned him the title of Disco King. The exuberant 2- to 6-year-olds screamed their approval, smitten by the mischievous leader with the wide grin and calming voice as he led the church school's students and staff through 45 minutes of learning wrapped up in movement and song.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2001
Growing up in New Jersey during the 1950s and 1960s naturally meant trips to the boardwalks of Asbury Park, Seaside Heights and Wildwood during the summer months. And as the summer season draws to a close and the shadows lengthen, it's a good time to remember those strolls from long ago when the boardwalk always seemed to faintly smell of tar and oil and the crowds were intent on experiencing all possible pleasures. And if you weren't entertained by the oceans of neon lights, whirling rides, Skee Ball parlors and carousels that pumped out jazzy tunes popular in 1925, there was always the food.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 5, 2007
John Taylor's first date with Terri Redman in 1985 ended abruptly. He drove her home to find her parents rushing to answer a call to support the Howard County firefighters on the scene of a serious accident. "Wait a minute, I'll go with you," Terri said. She promptly left with her parents. By all accounts, it was not the most romantic. "He spent a lot of time waiting for me to get home from the firehouse," said Terri, 40, summing up their subsequent courtship. Taylor had met Redman during training exercises of the Civil Air Patrol and understood that answering a call for an organization you are committed to is just "what you do."
NEWS
February 7, 2003
Emma Theresa Taylor, 89, homemaker Emma Theresa Taylor, a Baltimore homemaker, died of cancer Jan. 31 at the Millennium Nursing Home in Ellicott City. The Walbrook resident was 89. Born Emma Theresa Johnson in Lusby, she attended Calvert County public schools. She moved to Baltimore in 1932 and five years later married John Taylor, a stationary engineer for the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. at Sparrows Point. He died in 1978. She was a former member of St. Monica Roman Catholic Church, then located in South Baltimore, the old St. Joseph Church on West Lee Street and St. Peter Claver on Fremont Avenue.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
After convincing his mostly preschool audience to chant, "Dance, Kinderman, dance" a few times, John Taylor pretended to timidly oblige. But he cleverly surprised his young spectators when he flamboyantly cocked his right hip and unleashed a sample of the flashy footwork and smooth moves that long ago earned him the title of Disco King. The exuberant 2- to 6-year-olds screamed their approval, smitten by the mischievous leader with the wide grin and calming voice as he led the church school's students and staff through 45 minutes of learning wrapped up in movement and song.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1996
STANFORD, Calif. -- As one of the most popular and engaging instructors at Stanford University, economics Professor John Taylor often lectures to as many as 500 students in his introductory economics class.But lately, he's been sharing his theories and insights in a much more intimate setting: the small circle of economic advisers to likely Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole.Regarded as one of the country's top economists, Taylor was a major architect of Dole's economic plan that calls for a 15 percent across-the-board tax cut and a reduction in the capital gains tax. He has traveled with Dole in the days leading up to the plan's unveiling, and was the only one of Dole's cadre of six key economics advisers to join him for Monday's announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 15, 2000
John Taylor has a message. In fact, he has many messages, and his alter ego, KinderMan - dressed in bow tie, red suspenders and bowler hat - is the means of delivery. "We teach through rhymes and raps I've created," says Taylor, host of the Emmy Award-winning children's show "KinderTime," which runs on ABC Saturday mornings at 8. Taylor also travels the country preaching positive thoughts to children and families using the arts as his tools. Shows such as "KinderCise" promote learning through movement, using chants and dances to stimulate the mind.
NEWS
November 17, 1991
From: Gil SouthEllicott CityWhen I saw your headline concerning Linda Jarvis, my heart broke (Howard County Sun, Obituaries, "Linda Jarvis, Sun ad sales, 48" Nov.10). I just could not believe she had died. What a wonderful lady! Idid not know she had cancer, especially for eight years.Her smile, demeanor and attitude indicated to all who knew her that she was asweet, caring and honest person.Your paper has truly lost a wonderful employee. Your clients have lost a trustworthy friend.FEAGA ASSAILEDFrom: William HiltonHighlandOutrageous!
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | April 21, 1991
John Taylor's 'kindercise' mixes education with danceThe man knows how to mambo. And merengue. And do nearly any other move you can think of, including the tic-toc hustle, a step he created during his days as local disco king."
NEWS
By MICHAEL GRAY and MICHAEL GRAY,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
The Rivalry: Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, and the Golden Age of Basketball John Taylor Random House / 432 pages I am a little too young to have seen two of the greatest centers in basketball history during their primes. Bill Russell, the Boston Celtics star whose teams won 11 National Basketball Association titles from the late 1950s to the late 1960s, turned pro the year I was born. Wilt Chamberlain, the only man to score 100 points in an NBA game, and who averaged 30 points and 23 rebounds per game over his 14-year career, was on the downslide by the time I really began paying attention to basketball in the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | September 11, 2005
You know there is something different about this children's entertainer -- something besides the fact that he is pushing 70 -- when the Kinderman opens the act he's been perfecting for more than two decades. "We're gonna have a good time. We're gonna disturb the peace," he sings to the bright tones of a Casio keyboard as toddlers, preschoolers and parents sway before him. "And if we have too much fun, they're going to call the po-lice!" No matter how many times John "Kinderman" Taylor intones his signature line with its unique Baltimore pronunciation -- at birthday parties and malls, in senior centers and classrooms -- it never fails to draw a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 21, 2005
You should see this," he says. "I'm looking out over the Aegean Sea. It's awesome." That's John Taylor, bassist for Duran Duran. He's calling from his hotel suite in Greece, where the band is scheduled to perform later that night. The other members -- lead singer Simon LeBon, keyboardist Nick Rhodes, guitarist Andy Taylor and drummer Roger Taylor (none of the Taylors are related, by the way) -- are unavailable. The view from his window must be captivating. "Marvelous," he whispers. In the past nine months or so, Taylor and his band mates have had little time to sit still.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 12, 2004
They're still the way you remember them. Sort of. If you were around in the early '80s and tuned into this new channel called MTV, then you know all about Duran Duran: five stylish British guys who always looked coolly detached and glamorous. The band was among the first acts to exploit the video medium, using grand cinematic styles. Remember the video for "Rio"? The dudes were jet-setting playboys. And in the clip for "Hungry Like the Wolf," they were great adventurers reminiscent of something out of Raiders of the Lost Ark. And, yes, there was the music: synth-heavy and lyrically ambiguous.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
The first nine homes at Maple Lawn Farms, a 507-acre mixed-use community in Fulton that spawned months of debate about smart vs. slow growth, will be sold by a lottery Saturday. Rockville-based homebuilders Mitchell & Best Group LLC announced the number to nearly 400 potential homebuyers who attended a meeting last week at the Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville. "We can only build them so fast," Mitchell & Best President John Corgan said after the meeting. He said the company did not want to sell the homes too far away from their completion, and added that it expected to release another nine homes late next month.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
During the week in 1945 that Japan surrendered to the United States, a young graduate of the University of Arkansas arrived by train in Washington, took a room in a boardinghouse and reported to his new job at the National Archives. Fifty-eight years later, John E. Taylor arrives for work at the archives' mammoth records center in College Park before 7 a.m. each day. Among historians of war and intelligence - the archivist's specialty for half a century - his memory for documents and generosity with advice are legendary.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | January 31, 1993
John Taylor's wildlife paintings are being presented at the Ward Museum of Wildlife Art's Changing Gallery in Salisbury through March 14.Taylor, of Edgewater, is one of the Chesapeake Bay's best-known wildlife artists. All of the original paintings on display are featured in his best-selling book, "Birds of the Chesapeake Bay," published by Johns Hopkins Press."We managed to collect 35 of the 40 original paintings contained in the book for the showing," Taylor said during last week's ceremony conducted by the sponsoring Ward Foundation.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 5, 2007
John Taylor's first date with Terri Redman in 1985 ended abruptly. He drove her home to find her parents rushing to answer a call to support the Howard County firefighters on the scene of a serious accident. "Wait a minute, I'll go with you," Terri said. She promptly left with her parents. By all accounts, it was not the most romantic. "He spent a lot of time waiting for me to get home from the firehouse," said Terri, 40, summing up their subsequent courtship. Taylor had met Redman during training exercises of the Civil Air Patrol and understood that answering a call for an organization you are committed to is just "what you do."
NEWS
February 7, 2003
Emma Theresa Taylor, 89, homemaker Emma Theresa Taylor, a Baltimore homemaker, died of cancer Jan. 31 at the Millennium Nursing Home in Ellicott City. The Walbrook resident was 89. Born Emma Theresa Johnson in Lusby, she attended Calvert County public schools. She moved to Baltimore in 1932 and five years later married John Taylor, a stationary engineer for the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. at Sparrows Point. He died in 1978. She was a former member of St. Monica Roman Catholic Church, then located in South Baltimore, the old St. Joseph Church on West Lee Street and St. Peter Claver on Fremont Avenue.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2001
Growing up in New Jersey during the 1950s and 1960s naturally meant trips to the boardwalks of Asbury Park, Seaside Heights and Wildwood during the summer months. And as the summer season draws to a close and the shadows lengthen, it's a good time to remember those strolls from long ago when the boardwalk always seemed to faintly smell of tar and oil and the crowds were intent on experiencing all possible pleasures. And if you weren't entertained by the oceans of neon lights, whirling rides, Skee Ball parlors and carousels that pumped out jazzy tunes popular in 1925, there was always the food.
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