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John Sununu

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NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 12, 1990
It turns out that George Bush doesn't understand the theory behind the tax bubble any better than anyone else.George Bush is the good cop and John Sununu the bad cop. It's the bad cop you remember.
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NEWS
November 7, 2002
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NEWS
June 26, 1991
President Bush seems determined to keep his embattled chief of staff, John Sununu, even though most of that staff has concluded the chief has become a distinct liability as a result of his penchant for traveling first class.Maybe the president has figured out that the Sununu problem has already solved itself.Most of Sununu's controversial travel involved trips made on behalf of the Republican Party. We suspect the president knows there's not likely to be a great clamor in rank-and-file Republicans for a speaker who has come to embody privilege and arrogance.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 6, 2002
SALEM, N.H. - After 18 years in Congress, 12 of them in the Senate, Sen. Robert C. Smith will find out Tuesday whether he still holds the hearts of the state's Republicans he walked out on three years ago for a brief and disastrous independent presidential fling. Smith, who quickly relented and came home, is facing a strong primary challenge from Rep. John E. Sununu, a six-year House member and son of the former governor who served as chief of staff in the White House of the first President George Bush.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
As Sherman Adams proved during the Eisenhower era, even the flintiest of New Englanders can succumb to the allure of the White House ego trip. The victim this time is the president's chief of staff, John Sununu, who has taken 77 flights on Air Force jets at a cost to the taxpayers of half a million dollars in pursuit of official and not-so-official matters.The first thing to understand about this inside-the-beltway scandal is that someone (perhaps even someone in the White House) had to rat on Mr. Sununu, who proudly is not one of Washington's more lovable characters.
NEWS
By The Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Ky.) | December 9, 1991
EVENTS IN the past few months have dissipated the aura of invincibility that once surrounded George Bush, and Democratic presidential contenders from Massachusetts to California are leading the chorus for his ouster.At this point, however, the president should be more concerned with the other voices that are joining that chorus -- those of the increasing number of Americans who have fallen prey to a faltering economy.It's not that Bush, who just a few months ago was riding an unprecedented wave of popularity in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, hasn't provided other reasons to ponder his ability to win re-election next year.
NEWS
May 27, 1991
THE INVITATION seems so inviting: "10th Annual Classified Military Space Symposium: 'Military Space Systems in War and Peace'," hosted by the American Astronomical Society in the nation's capital.Discussion topics range from a keynote address by the commander of the Air Force Space Command to "Changed Environment for Military Space," "The Worldwide Threat -- a Hibernating Bear and Other Concerns", "The Fiscal Environment Threats to the Defense Budget", and "The View of the Environment from Capitol Hill."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | June 28, 1991
Washington -- Every time John Sununu opens his mouth, he gets himself into more trouble. He presents the criticism of him as an intellectual failing in those voicing it -- he said being in the Midwest involves travel, a concept hard for some to grasp. Back in Washington, he said he had been in the capital long enough to know that such criticism is a regular thing for one in his job -- in other words, the fault is in his critics. He has done nothing, except perform his job, to justify them.
NEWS
By William Safire | June 21, 1991
SAY WHAT you like about Jimmy Carter, but grant him instinctive good judgment about the American voter's distaste for royalism. He ostentatiously carried his own garment bag.John Sununu, to whom George Bush has delegated more power than anyone, does not understand that Americans despise big-shotism in public servants. On the contrary, he seems driven to call attention to his inflated sense of indispensability.He had already been reproved by the president, and ridiculed by the media, for using Air Force jets to fly to ski vacations and dentist visits.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 19, 1991
John Sununu reminds me of a child who, having promised not to sneak into his mother's wallet ever again, sneaks into her change purse instead.Having been caught and chastised for using military jets for ski trips and visits to his dentist, Sununu, the White House chief of staff, has now switched to White House limousines for his personal travel.Ann McDaniel and Tom DeFrank of Newsweek revealed that Sununu took a White House limousine for a five-hour trip to New York last Wednesday so he could buy some rare stamps for $5,000 at an auction and take care of other "personal business."
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | May 27, 1992
Washington. -- In a dry period for government expansion, there's a rare creation that warrants attention: the Critical Technologies Institute. The survivor of a perilous political birth, the newcomer symbolizes sharp ideological differences about what ails American industry and whether Washington can do much about it.Critical technologies are those dynamic amalgams of science, engineering and technology that spell success for high-tech industry and marketplace...
NEWS
By The Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Ky.) | December 9, 1991
EVENTS IN the past few months have dissipated the aura of invincibility that once surrounded George Bush, and Democratic presidential contenders from Massachusetts to California are leading the chorus for his ouster.At this point, however, the president should be more concerned with the other voices that are joining that chorus -- those of the increasing number of Americans who have fallen prey to a faltering economy.It's not that Bush, who just a few months ago was riding an unprecedented wave of popularity in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, hasn't provided other reasons to ponder his ability to win re-election next year.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 6, 1991
Charleston, South Crolina -- A White House adviser, I see by the New York Times, has been fairly trembling with anxious anticipation.''The whole town,'' he said Monday, ''is waiting for the other shoe to drop.'' The adviser was talking about reports that John Sununu, the president's chief of staff, was about to get the old heave-ho.Well, on Tuesday Mr. Sununu did get the old heave-ho. He resigned in a graceful letter remembering the fun times but acknowledging the not-so-fun times. As a pit bull or a pussycat, he would always be at the president's service.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd and Maureen Dowd,New York Times News Service | December 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- No one expected John Sununu to go gently. And he didn't.As his final act, the man hired by George Bush to be his political hatchet man took a swipe at the boss.In thinly veiled comments in his resignation letter, Mr. Sununu made it clear that he felt betrayed because, in many ways, he was doing exactly what Mr. Bush had hired him to do.The departing chief of staff was also obliquely reminding the president that this was not a matter of principle, but of ratings; his bullying tactics had been fine as long as the opinion polls did not go down.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 29, 1991
Washington -- When President Bush returned from a trip to Ohio the other day and reporters asked him about the future of his beleaguered chief of staff, John Sununu, he replied that voters "don't ask about the White House. They have different priorities out there." There's little reason to doubt it, but that doesn't mean that Sununu isn't a serious problem for him.At a time Bush's unwillingness to offer any firm corrective actions on the stagnant economy is sending him sliding in the polls, the last thing he needs is a public impression of weakness.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | November 6, 1991
Washington -- David Duke, ex-Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi propagandist, says with a straight face that he's not on the far right of politics at all.He insists that he is a loyal Republican, and supports George Bush whether Mr. Bush supports him or not.This embarrasses the president, particularly since the White House intervened in Louisiana politics to persuade Gov. Buddy Roemer to switch from Democrat to Republican, after which the president went...
NEWS
By Russell Baker | December 14, 1990
FOLLOWING is a copy of the memo prepared for President Bush on the eve of one of his infrequent appearances in Washington:I. Airport arrival: The customary red carpet from Air Force One to the president's local transportation vehicle will be dispensed with at the instance of Richard Darman, budget director, citing the following justifications:1. Since the RussellBakerpresident will be arriving on native soil it would seem unpatriotic, hence politically unwise, to allow carpeting of any color whatever to be placed between his feet and the American earth or its modern equivalents such as asphalt, concrete, oil slicks, cigarette butts, discarded beer cans and so forth.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 6, 1991
Charleston, South Crolina -- A White House adviser, I see by the New York Times, has been fairly trembling with anxious anticipation.''The whole town,'' he said Monday, ''is waiting for the other shoe to drop.'' The adviser was talking about reports that John Sununu, the president's chief of staff, was about to get the old heave-ho.Well, on Tuesday Mr. Sununu did get the old heave-ho. He resigned in a graceful letter remembering the fun times but acknowledging the not-so-fun times. As a pit bull or a pussycat, he would always be at the president's service.
NEWS
June 28, 1991
Bank mess could have been avoidedCongress should be ashamed of itself. The American taxpayers are going to foot the $200 billion-bailout of FSLIC to clean up the S&L mess. And now there are indications the FDIC may require billions of taxpayer dollars to salvage poorly run banks.All this could have been avoided if Congress had embraced a 1983 recommendation of the Grace Commission which would have eliminated the flat rate insurance premium FSLIC and FDIC charge. The new rate would have reflected the degree of risk associated with the individual institutions on a case-by-case basis.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | June 28, 1991
Washington -- Every time John Sununu opens his mouth, he gets himself into more trouble. He presents the criticism of him as an intellectual failing in those voicing it -- he said being in the Midwest involves travel, a concept hard for some to grasp. Back in Washington, he said he had been in the capital long enough to know that such criticism is a regular thing for one in his job -- in other words, the fault is in his critics. He has done nothing, except perform his job, to justify them.
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