Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Sullivan
IN THE NEWS

John Sullivan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 2010
In his very, very ambitious and long-time quest to become Baltimore County executive, Kevin Kamenetz's campaign was the dirtiest, most distorted and disgusting I have ever observed in over my 40 years of interest in Maryland politics. Mr. Bartenfelder is a man of integrity who kept to the high road and who can sleep easy at night. I have absolutely no doubt that in his own arrogant mind that Kamenetz thinks he ran a fair campaign with nothing to be ashamed of. Astonishing! Totally revolting!
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2010
In his very, very ambitious and long-time quest to become Baltimore County executive, Kevin Kamenetz's campaign was the dirtiest, most distorted and disgusting I have ever observed in over my 40 years of interest in Maryland politics. Mr. Bartenfelder is a man of integrity who kept to the high road and who can sleep easy at night. I have absolutely no doubt that in his own arrogant mind that Kamenetz thinks he ran a fair campaign with nothing to be ashamed of. Astonishing! Totally revolting!
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | March 26, 2000
John J. Sullivan, a man who makes his livelihood purchasing real estate for the U.S. Postal Service, was furious. He had submitted a full-price offer for a Patterson Park home and thought it would be his. When the house was sold to another agent working in the same office where Sullivan's offer was written the day before, he was hardly happy. "If I ever did anything like this, I'd be fired summarily," he said. He and his wife, Barbara, felt betrayed, he said. The whole situation was suspicious.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 19, 2009
Florence I. "Belle" Sullivan, a homemaker and volunteer, died from complications of a broken hip May 10 at her Bel Air home. She was 91. Florence Isabelle Dilworth was born and raised in Fork and graduated in 1935 from Bel Air High School. She attended what is now Towson University and Strayer's Business College. She worked in the late 1930s as a secretary at Black & Decker Corp. until marrying Paul D. "Kelly" Sullivan in 1942. Mr. Sullivan, who was a highway inspector for the State Highway Administration, died in 1989.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
One of the earliest-arriving migratory waterfowl in the upper Chesapeake area each fall is the teal. These small ducks appear in limited numbers, and consequently have not been the subject of local decoy carvers as often as the canvasback, bluebill or redhead. The rare antique decoys that have been found are up to 11 1/2 inches long and painted with distinctive blue-green wings. Some of the best examples were produced by John Holly and his son, James T. Holly, between 1850 and 1920; and by Robert F. McGaw in the 1920s and 1930s in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Members of the farming community are rushing to the defense of the county's agriculture liaison against a barrage of criticism leveled recently by county Councilman Lance C. Miller. In a move that farmers said would boost the importance and visibility of agriculture in Harford, County Executive David R. Craig has recommended in his proposed budget for next year that the liaison be elevated to a deputy chief of staff position in his Cabinet. The change would include a $17,000 salary increase to $75,000.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 19, 2009
Florence I. "Belle" Sullivan, a homemaker and volunteer, died from complications of a broken hip May 10 at her Bel Air home. She was 91. Florence Isabelle Dilworth was born and raised in Fork and graduated in 1935 from Bel Air High School. She attended what is now Towson University and Strayer's Business College. She worked in the late 1930s as a secretary at Black & Decker Corp. until marrying Paul D. "Kelly" Sullivan in 1942. Mr. Sullivan, who was a highway inspector for the State Highway Administration, died in 1989.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
My dad died 14 years ago, and there isn't a day goes by I don't wish there was some way I could talk to him. In "Frequency," an enjoyably complex sci-fi suspense thriller from director Gregory Hoblit ("Primal Fear"), New York police officer John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is given just that opportunity. Thanks to some huge sunspots, an overactive aurora borealis and what must be the most powerful vacuum tubes ever manufactured, Sullivan is able to reach back three decades and maybe a parallel universe or two and talk via ham radio with his firefighter dad, Frank (Dennis Quaid)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2002
Eighty opera fans who gathered at the Sheraton Barcelo Hotel for the Annapolis Opera's 29th annual fund-raising gala helped raise more than $5,000 for the opera. Festivities included dancing to the sounds of Zim Zimarel's combo, a silent auction, a three-course dinner with wine and a concert of arias and show tunes sung by lyric soprano Amanda Gosier, accompanied by the opera's music director, Ronald Gretz. The gala featured a genuine diva in Gosier, winner of the audience-favorite award at this year's vocal competition and later a soloist at the Pasta and Puccini dinner in February.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
It was a serendipitous moment when C. John Sullivan, a Harford County resident and decoy expert, came looking for one thing and found quite another. Walker, 55, a consultant to the Maryland Historical Society, Ward Museum of Waterfowl Art and Havre de Grace Decoy Museum, was visiting the home of Donald V. Walker in Berlin, Worcester County, with his friend Henry A. Fleckenstein Jr., seeking hand-carved decoys of shore birds for an auction. What he found in the attic of Walker's home was a collection of photographs taken by his grandfather, William G. Walker, and a companion leather-bound journal kept by his father, Robert Craighead Walker, that chronicled summer life in Ocean City during the balmy days before World War I. Sullivan had heard that the Walker family who lived in a spacious Washington brownstone during the winter, and spent summers in Ocean City and Block Island, R.I., were avid photographers as well as sports enthusiasts.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
One of the earliest-arriving migratory waterfowl in the upper Chesapeake area each fall is the teal. These small ducks appear in limited numbers, and consequently have not been the subject of local decoy carvers as often as the canvasback, bluebill or redhead. The rare antique decoys that have been found are up to 11 1/2 inches long and painted with distinctive blue-green wings. Some of the best examples were produced by John Holly and his son, James T. Holly, between 1850 and 1920; and by Robert F. McGaw in the 1920s and 1930s in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Members of the farming community are rushing to the defense of the county's agriculture liaison against a barrage of criticism leveled recently by county Councilman Lance C. Miller. In a move that farmers said would boost the importance and visibility of agriculture in Harford, County Executive David R. Craig has recommended in his proposed budget for next year that the liaison be elevated to a deputy chief of staff position in his Cabinet. The change would include a $17,000 salary increase to $75,000.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Boxing's fractured heavyweight division has four champions. They are the World Boxing Council's Hasim Rahman, the International Boxing Federation's Chris Byrd, the World Boxing Association's Nikolay Valuev and the World Boxing Organization's Lamon Brewster. Of these, Rahman's belt is considered the most accepted - although not necessarily because he is considered to be the best of the lot. The WBC belt held by Rahman has a lineage that can be traced back through such champions as Lennox Lewis, Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, Muhammad Ali, Rocky Marciano, Joe Louis -- all the way back to John L. Sullivan in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
John Francis Sullivan, an educator for nearly three decades who was a former assistant superintendent of schools in Howard County, died of Alzheimer's disease Friday at Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center in Pikesville. He was 84. Known as a self-effacing, gentle man who shunned a retirement party when he left the school system in 1978, the longtime Timonium resident loved studying. He earned three advanced degrees at the Johns Hopkins University while working as a teacher, principal and administrator.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 6, 2003
OCEAN CITY - On the boardwalk at 2nd Street, you can order the Paul Revere Smorgasbord. What's the Revolutionary hook? "The British are coming, the British are coming - for dinner"? The smorgasbord's next to a shop with T-shirts declaring, "Hold my beer while I kiss your girlfriend," and "FBI - Female Body Inspector," located directly across from a larger-than-life beach sculpture of the biblical Noah and his ark, with buckets for tipping the artist. In Ocean City, this is what passes for culture.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2002
Eighty opera fans who gathered at the Sheraton Barcelo Hotel for the Annapolis Opera's 29th annual fund-raising gala helped raise more than $5,000 for the opera. Festivities included dancing to the sounds of Zim Zimarel's combo, a silent auction, a three-course dinner with wine and a concert of arias and show tunes sung by lyric soprano Amanda Gosier, accompanied by the opera's music director, Ronald Gretz. The gala featured a genuine diva in Gosier, winner of the audience-favorite award at this year's vocal competition and later a soloist at the Pasta and Puccini dinner in February.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Think of "Third Watch" as "ER" times three.Apparently not satisfied with the medical mayhem chronicled weekly on his "ER" juggernaut, executive producer John Wells triples the freneticism in this new dramatic series (which moves to its regular time slot this Sunday at 8) by focusing on the entire emergency services crew on duty during the 3 p.m.-11 p.m. shift in a New York precinct.That means you've got paramedics, firefighters and police officers practically tripping over each other, trying to keep the population safe.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 6, 2003
OCEAN CITY - On the boardwalk at 2nd Street, you can order the Paul Revere Smorgasbord. What's the Revolutionary hook? "The British are coming, the British are coming - for dinner"? The smorgasbord's next to a shop with T-shirts declaring, "Hold my beer while I kiss your girlfriend," and "FBI - Female Body Inspector," located directly across from a larger-than-life beach sculpture of the biblical Noah and his ark, with buckets for tipping the artist. In Ocean City, this is what passes for culture.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
It was a serendipitous moment when C. John Sullivan, a Harford County resident and decoy expert, came looking for one thing and found quite another. Walker, 55, a consultant to the Maryland Historical Society, Ward Museum of Waterfowl Art and Havre de Grace Decoy Museum, was visiting the home of Donald V. Walker in Berlin, Worcester County, with his friend Henry A. Fleckenstein Jr., seeking hand-carved decoys of shore birds for an auction. What he found in the attic of Walker's home was a collection of photographs taken by his grandfather, William G. Walker, and a companion leather-bound journal kept by his father, Robert Craighead Walker, that chronicled summer life in Ocean City during the balmy days before World War I. Sullivan had heard that the Walker family who lived in a spacious Washington brownstone during the winter, and spent summers in Ocean City and Block Island, R.I., were avid photographers as well as sports enthusiasts.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
My dad died 14 years ago, and there isn't a day goes by I don't wish there was some way I could talk to him. In "Frequency," an enjoyably complex sci-fi suspense thriller from director Gregory Hoblit ("Primal Fear"), New York police officer John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is given just that opportunity. Thanks to some huge sunspots, an overactive aurora borealis and what must be the most powerful vacuum tubes ever manufactured, Sullivan is able to reach back three decades and maybe a parallel universe or two and talk via ham radio with his firefighter dad, Frank (Dennis Quaid)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.