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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2002
John Steinbeck, who would have turned 100 this week, is being celebrated with a film series at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, beginning Sunday with a 1941 documentary written by the Nobel Prize-winning author. The Forgotten Village, directed by Herbert Kline and narrated by Burgess Meredith, tells the story of a tiny Mexican village struggling to balance modern, new ways against the traditional culture. Also showing Sunday is John Steinbeck: An American Writer, a documentary produced in 1998 as part of A&E's Biography series.
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NEWS
January 20, 2008
A year ago, Carl O. Snowden was named the state's first director of the Office for Civil Rights in the Maryland Attorney General's Office. Born and raised in Annapolis, Snowden is a lifelong activist who has operated his own civil rights consulting firm. He helped bring a federal civil rights complaint against the Anne Arundel County school system and also led efforts to erect a statue of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Anne Arundel Community College. Snowden served on the Annapolis city council and in the administration of former Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens.
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By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
American writers may be divided into two categories, critic Philip Rahv wrote in the 1940s, "Paleface" or "Redskin." The "Palefaces," from Fenimore Cooper to Henry James, were cerebral, Anglicized, effete and tortured by ambiguity. The "Redskins" reveled in their Americanism. Led by Mark Twain, they were writers of the western hemisphere, "to the wigwam born." Rahv numbered among these boisterous Redskins John Steinbeck. The centennial of his birth comes next Wednesday. Steinbeck, like other of his roaring "Redskin" brethren, turns out to have more popular staying power than the cultish "Palefaces."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
A Terry Teachout Reader, by Terry Teachout. Yale University Press. 438 pages. $35. In 1977, at the tender age of 21, the Missouri-born Terry Teachout was reviewing concerts for The Kansas City Star, still working on the IBM Selectric typewriter that was a staple for those of us who were journalists then. Music may have been Teachout's first critical romance (he was himself a jazz bassist in Kansas City, one of the nation's great jazz towns), but dance, movies, TV and books soon followed as he moved to New York and "set up shop as a critic-for-hire," as he describes it in his introduction to A Terry Teachout Reader.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 1997
SALINAS, Calif. -- John Steinbeck knew this scrabbly little hometown of his didn't much like him. Matter of fact, folks here hated him.Hated his ugly stories. Hated his pitiful characters. He wrote of whores and tramps and drunks, and of those wrung-out crop pickers, those miserable migrants. Honored them, he did. Exalted them. And spat on the growers and shippers who built Salinas into something.The Salinas elite got back at him for his betrayal. They burned "The Grapes of Wrath" on Main Street.
FEATURES
By Tracie Cone and Tracie Cone,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1994
Bruce Ariss unlocks a dank wooden box of a building, releasing the musty scent of fish and stale beer as California sunlight washes in off Monterey Bay.The rays illuminate the scuffed plank floors, splintery walls and beamed ceilings that form "Doc" Ricketts' lab, a rustic hideaway essentially unchanged since being immortalized in "Cannery Row."For Mr. Ariss, 83, crossing the threshold is a journey back to the sardine-canning days when friend John Steinbeck visited Doc's lab to absorb for his novels the lives of locals, whom he then called "whores, pimps, gamblers and sons of bitches."
NEWS
April 29, 2003
Steve Young, 61, a CNN correspondent and anchor for CNN Financial News who specialized in technology, died of lung cancer Sunday in New York. Mr. Young had worked for CNN since 1987, and reported regularly for Moneyline. He was the founding anchor of the CNNfn program Digital Jam about advances in technology. He has reported on the dangers of cellular phones, the Microsoft antitrust battle and the fight against terrorism. He was an adjunct faculty member at Columbia University's journalism school, and before joining CNN had worked for CBS News for 20 years, covering the technology and space beats.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, but that ain't no matter.4 "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Mark TwainLate in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P-, Kentucky.:. "Uncle Tom's Cabin," Harriet Beecher StoweOn a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre', in the Museum of the Louvre.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
The Grapes of Wrath - the very name is enough to summon the taste of dust and despair. John Steinbeck, whose centennial is being observed this year, won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, which perhaps is his most famous work. Celebrated as a novelist and a writer of short stories, he was also a journalist - one who kept watch with the novelist's eye, finding enduring truths in the day-to-day events around him. During World War II, he reported from Italy and North Africa for the New York Herald Tribune.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 12, 1994
If you're interested in movies of mice and men -- or, to state it another way, if you're interested in movies "Of Mice and Men" -- the Showtime cable network has the evening's most intriguing offering. It's presenting back-to-back prime-time presentations of two film versions, made more than 50 years apart, of the classic John Steinbeck story.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- If you've watched Cloris Leachman in any of Mel Brooks' productions, from "Young Frankenstein" to her Teutonic Ms. Frick on TV's short-lived "The Nutt House," you know what kind of nanny she can play -- and, on tonight's episode of "The Nanny," she does.
NEWS
April 29, 2003
Steve Young, 61, a CNN correspondent and anchor for CNN Financial News who specialized in technology, died of lung cancer Sunday in New York. Mr. Young had worked for CNN since 1987, and reported regularly for Moneyline. He was the founding anchor of the CNNfn program Digital Jam about advances in technology. He has reported on the dangers of cellular phones, the Microsoft antitrust battle and the fight against terrorism. He was an adjunct faculty member at Columbia University's journalism school, and before joining CNN had worked for CBS News for 20 years, covering the technology and space beats.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
The Grapes of Wrath - the very name is enough to summon the taste of dust and despair. John Steinbeck, whose centennial is being observed this year, won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, which perhaps is his most famous work. Celebrated as a novelist and a writer of short stories, he was also a journalist - one who kept watch with the novelist's eye, finding enduring truths in the day-to-day events around him. During World War II, he reported from Italy and North Africa for the New York Herald Tribune.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2002
John Steinbeck, who would have turned 100 this week, is being celebrated with a film series at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, beginning Sunday with a 1941 documentary written by the Nobel Prize-winning author. The Forgotten Village, directed by Herbert Kline and narrated by Burgess Meredith, tells the story of a tiny Mexican village struggling to balance modern, new ways against the traditional culture. Also showing Sunday is John Steinbeck: An American Writer, a documentary produced in 1998 as part of A&E's Biography series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
American writers may be divided into two categories, critic Philip Rahv wrote in the 1940s, "Paleface" or "Redskin." The "Palefaces," from Fenimore Cooper to Henry James, were cerebral, Anglicized, effete and tortured by ambiguity. The "Redskins" reveled in their Americanism. Led by Mark Twain, they were writers of the western hemisphere, "to the wigwam born." Rahv numbered among these boisterous Redskins John Steinbeck. The centennial of his birth comes next Wednesday. Steinbeck, like other of his roaring "Redskin" brethren, turns out to have more popular staying power than the cultish "Palefaces."
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 1997
SALINAS, Calif. -- John Steinbeck knew this scrabbly little hometown of his didn't much like him. Matter of fact, folks here hated him.Hated his ugly stories. Hated his pitiful characters. He wrote of whores and tramps and drunks, and of those wrung-out crop pickers, those miserable migrants. Honored them, he did. Exalted them. And spat on the growers and shippers who built Salinas into something.The Salinas elite got back at him for his betrayal. They burned "The Grapes of Wrath" on Main Street.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, but that ain't no matter.4 "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Mark TwainLate in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P-, Kentucky.:. "Uncle Tom's Cabin," Harriet Beecher StoweOn a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre', in the Museum of the Louvre.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
Robert L. Bogomolny took on the role of president of the University of Baltimore on Aug. 1, 2002. A Harvard College and Harvard Law School graduate, Bogomolny came to UB from G.D. Searle & Co., where he served as corporate senior vice president and general counsel from 1987 to 2001. From 1977 to 1987, Bogomolny served as professor of law and dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University. Bogomolny has moved aggressively to develop UB's curriculum and programs, developing a joint M.B.A.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 14, 1994
The furry sea otters turned somersaults, wrestled and played, oblivious to the mostly pint-sized crowd mesmerized by the performance.The kids, their noses pressed up to the glass of the huge 55,000-gallon, two-story otter tank at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, moved on reluctantly. "They're just so cute and funny," said 8-year-old Reggie to her friend Molly Mermelstein, who lives not far away in Palo Alto and never tires of visiting here.That's because there's so much for parents and kids alike to do and see at this extraordinary place in Monterey, Calif.
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