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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
The premiere of Ladder 49 at the Senator Theatre the other day reminded me of my friend and colleague John F. Steadman, the much-beloved News-American and later Sun sports reporter and columnist, who died three years ago. Ladder 49 is a movie that John, who grew up a few blocks from the Senator in Govans, probably would have liked as the proud son of a firefighter. Several years ago, John, who was named for his father, was a speaker at the annual Fallen Heroes Memorial service at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
Mary Lee Steadman, who assisted her late sportswriter husband, John F. Steadman, in the production of his six books, died June 1 of dementia at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 83. The daughter of a firefighter and homemaker, Mary Lee Kreafle was born in Baltimore and spent her early years near Mondawmin, before moving to Ednor Gardens when she was in the eighth grade. She was a 1947 graduate of Catholic High School and worked for the Maryland Casualty Co. before her marriage in 1953 to John Steadman, who was then a News-Post sportswriter and was later named sports editor of the News American in 1958.
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SPORTS
January 2, 2001
A sampling of John Steadman's columns: On saving Memorial Stadium Baltimore, in taking down Memorial Stadium, must not denigrate a facade that is like no other in the world. It has been a message of everlasting public interest and pride, marveled at by viewers from near and far. It's devoted to all those who served and made uncalculated sacrifices on behalf of fellow citizens, some in their graves and others still not born. In fact, all humanity. It was the severe cost of enjoying the freedom democracy brings.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 8, 2011
Allow me to reintroduce myself. My name is Matt Vensel. You might remember me from blogs such as Virtual Vensanity and, well, OK, that's it. I have joined the staff at The Baltimore Sun after three awesome years at our sister paper, b free daily, which is why Virtual Vensanity has been retired and I'm starting fresh with this new blog, Baltimore Sports Blitz. Fans of the old blog can expect the same type of attitude and opinions, and my appreciation remains for random Baltimore sports nuggets such as Ray Rice singing Boyz II Men , Luke Scott bashing President Barack Obama and DJ Pauly D talking about Joe Flacco's "Jersey Shore" cred . If you're not familiar with my work at b, let me give you a quick rundown.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | January 2, 2001
BALTIMORE WITHOUT John Steadman isn't as proud and passionate, isn't as distinguished and distinctive, isn't as special and ever thus. Baltimore without John Steadman is a city that has lost a trusted conscience it can't replace. Baltimore without John Steadman is, well, hard to imagine. He spent a half-century writing gracefully, objectively and powerfully about sports on the pages of the News-Post, the News American, The Evening Sun and The Sun, his career spanning the entirety of Baltimore's modern era as a major-league sports town.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | January 2, 2001
AND SO DEATH came yesterday to John Steadman, and maybe to an era. He was our great rememberer. He went back to a time when the ballplayers seemed to come down from Olympus instead of the accountant's office, a time when the sportswriters told of broken-field runs instead of broken relationships between adoring fans and ballclubs sneaking off for sweeter financial deals. He thought a clean conscience counted for more than anything. He saw sports as a community's great common denominator and helped create a whole era of good feeling around here, a time when the Baltimore Colts showed a city how to shake off its historic inferiority complex and the Baltimore Orioles were the best team money couldn't buy. He believed in underdogs, and he wrote about them with passion; but he cultivated characters, and he saw the world with a twinkle in his eye. When he was sports editor of a newspaper of dear memory called the News American, he assembled a team of reporters to match anybody's: Neal Eskridge and N. P. "Swami" Clark, Clem Florio and Charlie Lamb, Jim Henneman and Chuck McGeehan, George Taylor and Bill Christine, men whose bylines became household names.
NEWS
January 3, 2001
HE WAS A gentle man and a gentleman. Writer John Steadman entertained sports fans with his upbeat newspaper columns for more than half a century. He covered the Baltimore athletic scene with a tenderness and appreciation of the human spirit that few have rivaled. Mr. Steadman died Monday at 73 after a long struggle with cancer. How ironic that he waited to take his final bow until Baltimore once again had a winning football playoff team to applaud. He wrote about the human side of sports, the unsung heroes and the untold stories, the adversities athletes overcame.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
Mary Lee Steadman, who assisted her late sportswriter husband, John F. Steadman, in the production of his six books, died June 1 of dementia at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 83. The daughter of a firefighter and homemaker, Mary Lee Kreafle was born in Baltimore and spent her early years near Mondawmin, before moving to Ednor Gardens when she was in the eighth grade. She was a 1947 graduate of Catholic High School and worked for the Maryland Casualty Co. before her marriage in 1953 to John Steadman, who was then a News-Post sportswriter and was later named sports editor of the News American in 1958.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
He was remembered as the poet laureate of Baltimore sports. He was recalled as a benevolent boss whose eyes twinkled with delight at newsroom horseplay. And, as big names in sports, journalism and politics gathered yesterday to bid farewell to a legendary sportswriter, John Steadman was celebrated as the humblest of men of faith and a loving husband and uncle. As the kind of man who regularly gave a young niece spare change and Chuckles candies - and a model for living right. "Be it the family home, his church home, the press box, the newsroom, the football field or even Baltimore itself, he made it all his dwelling place," said the Rev. Frank Donio of St. Jude Shrine, celebrating a funeral Mass where sports metaphors played well.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2001
John Steadman, who chronicled the Maryland sports scene in his newspaper columns, books and commentaries in a career that spanned seven decades, died of cancer yesterday at a Towson hospice. He was 73. A one-time minor-league baseball player, Mr. Steadman rose to the top of his craft and won election to the National Sportswriters and Sportscasters Hall of Fame last year. With a bent for the offbeat and a passion for the past, he fleshed out the seminal figures in sports, both celebrated and obscure, enlightening readers of Baltimore newspapers for more than a half-century.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and candy.thomson@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
At 2:53:42 Friday afternoon, thousands of Orioles fans committed an act of patriotic blasphemy. Or engaged in a show of loyalty to the hometown team on Opening Day. To "O" or not to "O," that has been the question since, well, when? Sometime in the 1970s, fans and Mike Gesker, author of The Orioles Encyclopedia, seem to agree. But there the agreement ends. Like the debate about the worthiness of playing "Thank God, I'm a Country Boy" during the seventh-inning stretch, the "O" argumentgoes round and round, getting stuck every couple of years like a phonograph needle on an old record.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Baltimore has a storied sports history, so we thought it would be interesting to come up with a Top 10 list of the strangest moments in the annals of Charm City. 1. On Dec. 19, 1976, minutes after a playoff game between the Colts and the Pittsburgh Steelers, 33-year-old pilot Donald Kroner crashed his small plane into the upper deck at Memorial Stadium. Amazingly, no one was seriously injured, in part because the Steelers crushed the Colts that day and a lot of the crowd had left early.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN | April 4, 2006
Opening Day marks the unofficial start of spring. For some of us, Thursday and the first round of the Masters holds similar appeal. This year, both events evoke other sentiments about the changing of the seasons. There was a tribute to the late Elrod Hendricks at Camden Yards yesterday. Two monumental anniversaries at Augusta National Golf Club have me recalling other absent men, one a friend, the other my father. This is the 10th anniversary of Greg Norman's collapse at the 1996 Masters, golf's greatest train wreck ever.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
The premiere of Ladder 49 at the Senator Theatre the other day reminded me of my friend and colleague John F. Steadman, the much-beloved News-American and later Sun sports reporter and columnist, who died three years ago. Ladder 49 is a movie that John, who grew up a few blocks from the Senator in Govans, probably would have liked as the proud son of a firefighter. Several years ago, John, who was named for his father, was a speaker at the annual Fallen Heroes Memorial service at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 4, 2001
NOW COMES the hour when John Steadman's death matters as well as his life. Cancer took the life of Baltimore's longtime newspaper sports voice New Year's Day, and next Tuesday the American Cancer Society will honor Steadman with a golf tournament -- the John Steadman Tournament of Hope at Beechtree Golf Club in Aberdeen. The tournament's proceeds will benefit the Hope Lodge, the American Cancer Society's "home away from home" for cancer patients. John would have loved the idea. In his half-century writing columns for the dearly departed News American, and the dearly departed Evening Sun, and The Sun, he wrote not merely about home runs and blocked punts, but triumphs of the human spirit.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
John Steadman, the late sports columnist who wrapped up a half-century of writing in this city at The Sun, was honored yesterday as the recipient of the prestigious Red Smith Award. In the audience, Steadman's wife, Mary Lee, listened to his old friends and co-workers reminisce about her husband with tears falling down her cheeks. "It's overwhelming," she said. "There have been a lot of honors for him, but this has been the hardest one. People say to me, `You've done so well. You've done so well.
SPORTS
April 20, 1997
Here's to Steadman...In reference to John Steadman's Sunday column from Augusta, Ga. -- Amen!Cal BeachPikesville... and to Tiger WoodsI would like to commend John Steadman for his outstanding column on Tiger Woods. He gave the reader insight into the talent of an incredible young man who has shown great sportsmanship and respect for the game of golf. Steadman honored Woods for his talent and not for being the first man of color to accomplish such a feat. Steadman could not have said it any better when he said that "ability should be the only score card to assessing the performance of a man or woman."
SPORTS
May 27, 2001
Notre Dame doesn't buy lacrosse success I am very upset after reading Mike Preston's column published in the May 22 edition of The Sun. In particular, I have to disagree with the following portion: "As for Notre Dame, it was kind of strange hearing the band playing the school's fight song at a lacrosse game. "But with the athletic department revenues and other features of the school, the Fighting Irish showed you can almost buy a championship in any sport. "If you're a high school recruit and you visit Notre Dame or Johns Hopkins during the fall, would you be more inclined to enroll at Notre Dame after watching a football game against USC or watching Hopkins tangle with Western Maryland?"
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