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John Snowden

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NEWS
May 26, 2000
JOHN SNOWDEN didn't ask for forgiveness. He asked for more than that. An African-American accused of killing a pregnant white woman, he asked people to believe that he didn't do it. He asked the jury that convicted him in a racially charged, controversial trial. And he asked the throng that watched him drop four feet to his death, the last person to die on Anne Arundel County's gallows. Snowden didn't get what he wanted and never will, even in death. His conviction will stand. But his advocates are seeking the next best thing to a proclamation of innocence.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Since the days of slavery and smallpox, Brewer Hill Cemetery, tucked on a 4 1/2 -acre plot near Westgate Circle in Annapolis, has been a largely overlooked presence in the state capital. Even with decade-old improvements, the African-American cemetery's tilted grave markers and uneven rows contrast with the Annapolis National Cemetery next door, full of Civil War Union soldiers whose white stones are neatly marked and maintained, with a plaque of the Gettysburg Address posted as a reminder of the cause for which they fell.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Advocates seeking a pardon for a black man they believe was wrongly convicted and executed in 1919 for killing a pregnant white woman will hold a memorial service for him on what would have been his 110th birthday. They hope to know by the ceremony June 10 if Gov. Parris N. Glendening will pardon John Snowden, the last man hanged in Anne Arundel County. Snowden was convicted of the Aug. 8, 1917, killing of Lottie Mae Brandon. His hanging Feb. 28, 1919, brought such turmoil to the state capital that the National Guard was called in to keep the peace.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
The mob pronounced Henry Davis guilty, the man the papers called the "ravisher of Mrs. Reid." They broke into the jail a few blocks from the State House and kidnapped him, paraded him through the black community before lynching him from a chestnut tree on Brickyard Hill and riddling his body with bullets. Hundreds of people, black and white, came to the bluff overlooking College Creek to see the body of the last man lynched in Annapolis. A photographer took pictures of the battered corpse, which he turned into postcards that sold two for 25 cents.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
The mob pronounced Henry Davis guilty, the man the papers called the "ravisher of Mrs. Reid." They broke into the jail a few blocks from the State House and kidnapped him, paraded him through the black community before lynching him from a chestnut tree on Brickyard Hill and riddling his body with bullets. Hundreds of people, black and white, came to the bluff overlooking College Creek to see the body of the last man lynched in Annapolis. A photographer took pictures of the battered corpse, which he turned into postcards that sold two for 25 cents.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
A program honoring Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to draw hundreds of area residents tonight to an Annapolis church that has been at the center of many African-American community events. The event was planned to recognize many of the governor's actions affecting the county, including his appointments of the first black man and the first two women to the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court and the recent posthumous pardon of John Snowden, a black Annapolis iceman hanged in 1919 after a white jury convicted him of killing a pregnant white woman.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Advocates seeking a gubernatorial pardon for the last man to die on the gallows in Anne Arundel County are asking the public for donations for a memorial service they are planning for him next month. With 1,000 invitations being printed and a grave-marking plaque on order for the ceremony for John Snowden, they hope to raise $5,000. The group has raised a fraction of that so far but members said yesterday that with word spreading through Memorial Day weekend church appeals and community organizations, they believe they will cover their costs.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
The image from her childhood home on Larkin Street in Annapolis that stuck with Hazel "Missy" Snowden was an old Evening Capital clipping about an anonymous person claiming responsibility for the murder of a pregnant young wife. Next to it, on her father's dresser mirror, was a photograph of John Snowden -- whether from a newspaper or a family photo, she doesn't recall. But what she remembers is that this murder of the white woman was blamed on John Snowden, her father's brother, a black man who was convicted and hanged in 1919, before this other person claimed he did it. Her uncle went to his death proclaiming his innocence.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | December 20, 1992
Once again, the season of forgiveness brings no pardon for John Snowden.Not that it matters in any practical sense. Snowden is dead. A black man, he was the last person to die on the gallows in Anne Arundel County, hanged Feb. 28, 1919, for the murder of a white woman. His remains lie in an unmarked grave in the Brewer's Hill cemetery on West Street.Perhaps he rests in peace.But for some living Annapolis residents -- the older ones who recall the Snowden case and a younger generation that has read and heard about it -- his death still disturbs.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
EVERY Marylander should be ashamed that it took eight decades to set the record straight on John Snowden, a black man who was hanged -- after an apocryphal arrest and trial -- for allegedly raping and killing a white Annapolis woman. And every Marylander should be terrified by the idea that eight decades from now, someone could be apologizing for the death-penalty injustices taking place today in our state. Everything that was wrong with Snowden's execution can be found among cases along Maryland's death row today.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
A program honoring Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to draw hundreds of area residents tonight to an Annapolis church that has been at the center of many African-American community events. The event was planned to recognize many of the governor's actions affecting the county, including his appointments of the first black man and the first two women to the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court and the recent posthumous pardon of John Snowden, a black Annapolis iceman hanged in 1919 after a white jury convicted him of killing a pregnant white woman.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
EVERY Marylander should be ashamed that it took eight decades to set the record straight on John Snowden, a black man who was hanged -- after an apocryphal arrest and trial -- for allegedly raping and killing a white Annapolis woman. And every Marylander should be terrified by the idea that eight decades from now, someone could be apologizing for the death-penalty injustices taking place today in our state. Everything that was wrong with Snowden's execution can be found among cases along Maryland's death row today.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
The image from her childhood home on Larkin Street in Annapolis that stuck with Hazel "Missy" Snowden was an old Evening Capital clipping about an anonymous person claiming responsibility for the murder of a pregnant young wife. Next to it, on her father's dresser mirror, was a photograph of John Snowden -- whether from a newspaper or a family photo, she doesn't recall. But what she remembers is that this murder of the white woman was blamed on John Snowden, her father's brother, a black man who was convicted and hanged in 1919, before this other person claimed he did it. Her uncle went to his death proclaiming his innocence.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
While his audience was finishing breakfast Friday, Carl O. Snowden was talking about a corpse - a man shot at 100 times by a mob of Annapolitans during a long-ago lynching. The 1906 kidnapping, shooting and hanging of a black man who was suspected in a rape is a horror story, Snowden said. The white men accused in his death were neither identified nor punished. It may also embarrass a city that prides itself on local history. "This is not talked about on any historical tour," Snowden said before his speech last week at the weekly "Almost 7:30 Friday Morning Democratic Breakfast," at Fran O'Brien's on Main Street.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
"I have been imprisoned one year and six months and now am about to shake hands with time and welcome eternity, for in a few hours from now, I shall step out of time into eternity to pay the penalty of a crime I am not guilty of." - From the last statement of John Snowden. Carl Snowden said that growing up in Annapolis, he often heard the story of the 1919 hanging of John Snowden, an event that shook the capital's African-American community and whose story was handed down from generation to generation.
NEWS
May 26, 2000
JOHN SNOWDEN didn't ask for forgiveness. He asked for more than that. An African-American accused of killing a pregnant white woman, he asked people to believe that he didn't do it. He asked the jury that convicted him in a racially charged, controversial trial. And he asked the throng that watched him drop four feet to his death, the last person to die on Anne Arundel County's gallows. Snowden didn't get what he wanted and never will, even in death. His conviction will stand. But his advocates are seeking the next best thing to a proclamation of innocence.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
"I have been imprisoned one year and six months and now am about to shake hands with time and welcome eternity, for in a few hours from now, I shall step out of time into eternity to pay the penalty of a crime I am not guilty of." - From the last statement of John Snowden. Carl Snowden said that growing up in Annapolis, he often heard the story of the 1919 hanging of John Snowden, an event that shook the capital's African-American community and whose story was handed down from generation to generation.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | December 30, 1990
For 18 months, accused murderer John Snowden proclaimed his innocence to all who would listen. No matter. He died on the gallows in Annapolis on Feb. 28, 1919, the last man to be hanged in Anne Arundel County.Seventy-one years later the state Parole Commission ponders the question of guilt or innocence that did not die with Snowden that morning in the jail house courtyard on Calvert Street. The commission is trying to decide if Snowden -- on grounds of having been unfairly convicted -- should be granted an executive clemency.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Advocates seeking a gubernatorial pardon for the last man to die on the gallows in Anne Arundel County are asking the public for donations for a memorial service they are planning for him next month. With 1,000 invitations being printed and a grave-marking plaque on order for the ceremony for John Snowden, they hope to raise $5,000. The group has raised a fraction of that so far but members said yesterday that with word spreading through Memorial Day weekend church appeals and community organizations, they believe they will cover their costs.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Advocates seeking a pardon for a black man they believe was wrongly convicted and executed in 1919 for killing a pregnant white woman will hold a memorial service for him on what would have been his 110th birthday. They hope to know by the ceremony June 10 if Gov. Parris N. Glendening will pardon John Snowden, the last man hanged in Anne Arundel County. Snowden was convicted of the Aug. 8, 1917, killing of Lottie Mae Brandon. His hanging Feb. 28, 1919, brought such turmoil to the state capital that the National Guard was called in to keep the peace.
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