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John Singleton

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Spiller and Nancy Spiller,Entertainment News Service | March 13, 1992
BOYZ N THE HOODColumbia Pictures Home VideoNo Price Given"Boyz N the Hood," the debut theatrical feature from 23-year-old University of Southern California film school graduate John Singleton, is a powerful autobiographical work that delivers an important message in terms its target audience can understand. That means rough language and graphic depiction of the violence endemic to the very real and ugly world of Los Angeles' South Central ghetto. But not a single frame exploits, as the remarkably self-assured Singleton sheds some long overdue light on the virtually institutionalized problems of inner-city blacks.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that claims by two former Anne Arundel County employees, who allege they lost their jobs because of retaliation by the administration of former County Executive John R. Leopold, can advance to trial. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake threw out some parts of the lawsuits by Karla Hamner, a former spokeswoman for Leopold, and Joan Harris, who worked as a constituent services specialist during the executive's first term. But the judge "kept the crux of both of the cases" said John Singleton, an attorney representing both plaintiffs.
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FEATURES
By Iain Blair and Iain Blair,Entertainment News Service | July 11, 1993
It's a long, long way from the mean streets of South Central Los Angeles to a plush office in the Capra Building of Sony Studios. But when you enter the headquarters of John Singleton's New Deal Productions, it's quickly apparent that the 25-year-old Wunderkind writer-director hasn't forgotten his roots.While the hushed corridors outside are swarming with suits, inside Mr. Singleton is kicking back in a T-shirt and jeans as he pumps up the hip-hop soundtrack and watches a trailer for his eagerly anticipated new film, "Poetic Justice" (which opens July 23)
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
The National Labor Relations Board has sided with about 350 taxi drivers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, ruling that they should be classified as employees, not independent contractors, by the company that holds the state contract to operate cabs at the airport. The drivers, who work for BWI Taxi Management Inc., have said for years that they should be treated as employees and given access to benefits such as unemployment and workers' compensation insurance.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 16, 2000
Let's talk trash. There's bad trash - those summer movies on the order of "M:I2" and "Gone in 60 Seconds," whose cardinal emotional effect on filmgoers is the feeling that they've been bludgeoned to death by the filmmakers' egos, cynicism and newly laden coffers. Then there's good trash - throwaway, intellectually undemanding action movies that, despite their heavy body counts and hard edges, are executed with a touch of class and a sunny disposition. The good news is that "Shaft," John Singleton's eagerly anticipated updating of the 1971 Blaxploitation classic, can be happily tossed into the latter bin. Featuring a magnetic performance by Samuel L. Jackson in the very cool lead role, "Shaft" is a throwback in the best sense of the word.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 21, 1997
Undoubtedly a great tragedy occurred over the first four days of January 1923 in the small town of Rosewood, Fla. An American Lidice, the prosperous little village on the Gulf Coast xTC was wiped out by the combined forces of ignorance, cruelty, class envy and pure-D racism. Depending on sources, somewhere between six and 150 African-Americans died over those days.And undoubtedly a great movie could have been made of this still unhealed scab on the body politic. But "Rosewood," John Singleton's film of these events, isn't it. Passionate, powerful, even gripping, the movie finally gives up to base commercial impulses and falls back on the oldest and cheapest of strokes.
FEATURES
March 26, 1992
The best director category in the Oscar competition includes Barry Levinson, a native Baltimorean who has made several films here but not the 1991 movie for which he was nominated; Jonathan Demme, whose nominated movie was partially set in Baltimore but not filmed here, and John Singleton, at 23 the youngest person ever nominated in the category. Winners will be revealed in a March 30 telecast on ABC-TV (Channel 13).The Evening Sun would like to know which director you feel should win: Barry Levinson, "Bugsy"; Jonathan Demme, "The Silence of the Lambs"; John Singleton, "Boyz N the Hood"; Oliver Stone, "JFK," or Ridley Scott, "Thelma & Louise."
NEWS
October 12, 2003
Saturday, Oct. 18 9:30 a.m.:gates open to public 10 a.m.: camps open; lecture, "The Boys of Company C," by John Deppen; the Foundation for the Preservation of Civil War History; side-saddle demonstration 10:30 a.m.:field infantry drills 11:30 a.m.:lecture, "The Life & Times of John Singleton Mosby," by Dave Goetz 11:30 a.m.:field music 12:30 p.m.:cavalry demonstration 1 p.m.: the Gilmore Light Ensemble with tenor Doug Jimerson 1:30 p.m.:signal demonstration;...
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Washington -- When Nathan McCall writes about the gang violence in American cities, he isn't just another journalist crunching statistics and venturing out for the occasional homeboy-in-the-street interview. He has strutted down such streets himself, armed and angry, and soon enough incarcerated.It's the brutal experience of someone who has been there that fuels his autobiographical book "Makes Me Wanna Holler: A Young Black Man in America," recently published by Random House. In it, this 39-year-old Washington Post reporter talks about racial tension in this country by way of his own life story.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2003
There are just 2 many things 2 be said about 2 Fast 2 Furious, the mega-octane sequel 2 the mega-octane smash of 2 summers ago. Like its ultra-hip coolness, evidenced right from the start not only by all the swaggering vernacular being tossed about (as well as by the title itself; nothing suggests street cred like substituting numbers for words), but by the veritable rainbow coalition of dudes who take part in the film-opening drag race. There's a white guy, a black guy, a Hispanic guy and an Asian gal. How fortunate that the local dragsters broke down by such perfect demographics.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
A former employee's lawsuit accusing Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold of retaliatory termination and creating a hostile work environment can move forward, a federal judge ordered Thursday, but she threw out several allegations and blocked the attempts of two other workers to join the suit. Judge Catherine C. Blake made the rulings in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, but did not rule on a motion for summary judgment requested by Leopold's attorneys, which would have ended the case.
NEWS
October 12, 2003
Saturday, Oct. 18 9:30 a.m.:gates open to public 10 a.m.: camps open; lecture, "The Boys of Company C," by John Deppen; the Foundation for the Preservation of Civil War History; side-saddle demonstration 10:30 a.m.:field infantry drills 11:30 a.m.:lecture, "The Life & Times of John Singleton Mosby," by Dave Goetz 11:30 a.m.:field music 12:30 p.m.:cavalry demonstration 1 p.m.: the Gilmore Light Ensemble with tenor Doug Jimerson 1:30 p.m.:signal demonstration;...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2003
There are just 2 many things 2 be said about 2 Fast 2 Furious, the mega-octane sequel 2 the mega-octane smash of 2 summers ago. Like its ultra-hip coolness, evidenced right from the start not only by all the swaggering vernacular being tossed about (as well as by the title itself; nothing suggests street cred like substituting numbers for words), but by the veritable rainbow coalition of dudes who take part in the film-opening drag race. There's a white guy, a black guy, a Hispanic guy and an Asian gal. How fortunate that the local dragsters broke down by such perfect demographics.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 16, 2000
Let's talk trash. There's bad trash - those summer movies on the order of "M:I2" and "Gone in 60 Seconds," whose cardinal emotional effect on filmgoers is the feeling that they've been bludgeoned to death by the filmmakers' egos, cynicism and newly laden coffers. Then there's good trash - throwaway, intellectually undemanding action movies that, despite their heavy body counts and hard edges, are executed with a touch of class and a sunny disposition. The good news is that "Shaft," John Singleton's eagerly anticipated updating of the 1971 Blaxploitation classic, can be happily tossed into the latter bin. Featuring a magnetic performance by Samuel L. Jackson in the very cool lead role, "Shaft" is a throwback in the best sense of the word.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
Had Elmore Leonard written "Showgirls," the result could very well have been "The Players Club," an uneasy mix of raunch and redemption that's far from a great film, but sure is entertaining.Filled with oddball characters and enough street attitude to land a contract with Death Row Records, "The Players Club" ultimately fails because its characters are too stereotyped to be fresh and its heroine gets off way too easy. The result is a film not far removed from the blaxploitation flicks of the '70s, films that reveled in their badness (that applies to whichever meaning of "bad" you use)
SPORTS
By KATHERINE DUNN | November 19, 1997
Player of the YearStephanie Hansen, Mercy, senior, hitter: With Hansen at the helm, the Magic went unbeaten through the Catholic League. Not only did she lead her team to a second straight tournament championship, but she also boosted the Magic (23-2) to the No. 6 ranking, its highest ever in The Sun's Top 15. The Catholic League Player of the Year, Hansen had a spectacular power game. The 6-foot outside hitter had 313 kills, averaging 4.4 per game. That was up from 2.8 a year ago. At the prestigious North Caroline Bulldog Tournament in October, Hansen averaged five kills per game against some of the state's top competition, including No. 1 Centennial.
SPORTS
By KATHERINE DUNN | November 19, 1997
Player of the YearStephanie Hansen, Mercy, senior, hitter: With Hansen at the helm, the Magic went unbeaten through the Catholic League. Not only did she lead her team to a second straight tournament championship, but she also boosted the Magic (23-2) to the No. 6 ranking, its highest ever in The Sun's Top 15. The Catholic League Player of the Year, Hansen had a spectacular power game. The 6-foot outside hitter had 313 kills, averaging 4.4 per game. That was up from 2.8 a year ago. At the prestigious North Caroline Bulldog Tournament in October, Hansen averaged five kills per game against some of the state's top competition, including No. 1 Centennial.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 26, 1991
Southampton, New York -- We saw a very good foreign film here the other night, one of those coming-of-age movies in exotic settings. The people were attractive, likable types trying to survive in a hostile environment. The language was a little hard to follow sometimes, but the customs and costumes were interesting in a kind of National Geographic way.It was called ''Boyz N the Hood'' and it was set in a place called South-Central Los Angeles.The film is the work of a gifted 23-year-old black man named John Singleton -- from the ''hood.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 21, 1997
Undoubtedly a great tragedy occurred over the first four days of January 1923 in the small town of Rosewood, Fla. An American Lidice, the prosperous little village on the Gulf Coast xTC was wiped out by the combined forces of ignorance, cruelty, class envy and pure-D racism. Depending on sources, somewhere between six and 150 African-Americans died over those days.And undoubtedly a great movie could have been made of this still unhealed scab on the body politic. But "Rosewood," John Singleton's film of these events, isn't it. Passionate, powerful, even gripping, the movie finally gives up to base commercial impulses and falls back on the oldest and cheapest of strokes.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Washington -- When Nathan McCall writes about the gang violence in American cities, he isn't just another journalist crunching statistics and venturing out for the occasional homeboy-in-the-street interview. He has strutted down such streets himself, armed and angry, and soon enough incarcerated.It's the brutal experience of someone who has been there that fuels his autobiographical book "Makes Me Wanna Holler: A Young Black Man in America," recently published by Random House. In it, this 39-year-old Washington Post reporter talks about racial tension in this country by way of his own life story.
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