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By New York Times News Service The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | June 19, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- John Sculley, the chairman of Apple Computer Inc., said yesterday that he would relinquish his role as chief executive to pursue alliances involving new computer-based technologies.Mr. Sculley, 54, who came to Apple 10 years ago from PepsiCo Inc., will retain the title of chairman and hand over the chief executive's job to Apple's president, Michael Spindler.In an interview, Mr. Sculley said he would direct most of his energy to creating new markets for the personal computer maker, in concert with communications, publishing and entertainment companies.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
NEW YORK -- In one of the stranger chapters in recent corporate history, John Sculley, the former marketing whiz behind Apple computers, quit his job as head of an obscure telecommunications company yesterday, saying that its president had hired him only to profit off his name.Mr. Sculley, who left Apple Computer Inc. last year after it suffered a series of business setbacks, said in a statement that he would not have joined Spectrum Information Technologies Inc. in October if the company been more upfront with him.He said he was not told that the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the company's accounting practices.
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BUSINESS
By Tom Steinert-Threlkeld and Tom Steinert-Threlkeld,Dallas Morning News | April 27, 1992
Dallas -- In baseball, the annual stumbling of the old Brooklyn Dodgers inspired the refrain, "Wait till next year."In computing, the stumbling of Steve Jobs' second venture has led to similar refrains. The company admits its first products bombed and its second took off slowly. It almost seemed fitting that the company is named Next Inc.But Next's year may finally be here."Next has a real opportunity to be the next billion-dollar computer company," said Mr. Jobs, who started Apple Computer Inc.His latest optimism has some foundation.
NEWS
By Joshua Quittner and Joshua Quittner,Newsday | July 26, 1993
When Randy Hyatt wants to watch the movie "The Last of the Mohicans" (an urge that has overcome him eight times so far), all he has to do is reach for the remote control.At near light speed, Mr. Hyatt's wish, translated into on-off pulses of light, jitters across a thin, fiber-optic tube of glass that attaches his house, in Cerritos, Calif., to a computer at the local phone company, GTE, a few blocks away. In less time than it takes to race from Mr. Hyatt's sofa into the adjacent kitchen for a Diet Coke, men in Mohawks are shooting it out on the large-screen television that dominates his living room.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 4, 1993
The second day of Bill Clinton's economic summit coincided with IBM's latest admission of woeful performance: bye-bye to another 25,000 jobs, a $6 billion, one-time charge to earnings and a $1 billion reduction in the product- development budget. Clinton, hinting at a willingness to jawbone his way into microeconomic decisions, bemoaned the product-development cut.Whoa, Bill.Had I been charged with drafting Clinton's statement about IBM (assuming cause for a statement -- a shaky assumption)
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
NEW YORK -- In one of the stranger chapters in recent corporate history, John Sculley, the former marketing whiz behind Apple computers, quit his job as head of an obscure telecommunications company yesterday, saying that its president had hired him only to profit off his name.Mr. Sculley, who left Apple Computer Inc. last year after it suffered a series of business setbacks, said in a statement that he would not have joined Spectrum Information Technologies Inc. in October if the company been more upfront with him.He said he was not told that the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the company's accounting practices.
NEWS
By Joshua Quittner and Joshua Quittner,Newsday | July 26, 1993
When Randy Hyatt wants to watch the movie "The Last of the Mohicans" (an urge that has overcome him eight times so far), all he has to do is reach for the remote control.At near light speed, Mr. Hyatt's wish, translated into on-off pulses of light, jitters across a thin, fiber-optic tube of glass that attaches his house, in Cerritos, Calif., to a computer at the local phone company, GTE, a few blocks away. In less time than it takes to race from Mr. Hyatt's sofa into the adjacent kitchen for a Diet Coke, men in Mohawks are shooting it out on the large-screen television that dominates his living room.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1994
Spectrum ousts its boardSpectrum Information Technologies Inc. replaced its entire board of directors and named Donald S. Amoruso as chief executive yesterday.Mr. Amoruso, 57, is the founder and principal consultant of DMA Associates of Westchester County, N.Y.Ten Spectrum directors already have resigned this year, most notably former Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley, who resigned as Spectrum's chairman in February.@
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 24, 1999
NEW YORK -- Rocky Aoki, founder of the Benihana Japanese restaurant chain, pleaded guilty yesterday to profiting from a tip that Spectrum Information Technologies Inc. was about to hire former Apple Computer Inc. chief John Sculley.The 60-year-old restaurateur was charged last year with insider trading by the U.S. attorney in Brooklyn, N.Y. His guilty pleas to four criminal counts of insider trading makes him eligible for a reduced prison sentence of 12 to 18 months, instead of a maximum of 10 years, prosecutors said.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 13, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- Asserting that computers are on an inevitable "collision course" with consumer electronics, Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley has outlined an aggressive plan to make his company a major force in creating a new generation of household gadgets blessed with computer brains.Apple's plan one day could put the company's software at the heart of a wide variety of sophisticated devices, such as "intelligent" digital televisions and telephones, and a new class of products that Mr. Sculey calls "Personal Digital Assistants," such as hand-held personal communicators and electronic books.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | June 19, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- John Sculley, the chairman of Apple Computer Inc., said yesterday that he would relinquish his role as chief executive to pursue alliances involving new computer-based technologies.Mr. Sculley, 54, who came to Apple 10 years ago from PepsiCo Inc., will retain the title of chairman and hand over the chief executive's job to Apple's president, Michael Spindler.In an interview, Mr. Sculley said he would direct most of his energy to creating new markets for the personal computer maker, in concert with communications, publishing and entertainment companies.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 4, 1993
The second day of Bill Clinton's economic summit coincided with IBM's latest admission of woeful performance: bye-bye to another 25,000 jobs, a $6 billion, one-time charge to earnings and a $1 billion reduction in the product- development budget. Clinton, hinting at a willingness to jawbone his way into microeconomic decisions, bemoaned the product-development cut.Whoa, Bill.Had I been charged with drafting Clinton's statement about IBM (assuming cause for a statement -- a shaky assumption)
BUSINESS
By Tom Steinert-Threlkeld and Tom Steinert-Threlkeld,Dallas Morning News | April 27, 1992
Dallas -- In baseball, the annual stumbling of the old Brooklyn Dodgers inspired the refrain, "Wait till next year."In computing, the stumbling of Steve Jobs' second venture has led to similar refrains. The company admits its first products bombed and its second took off slowly. It almost seemed fitting that the company is named Next Inc.But Next's year may finally be here."Next has a real opportunity to be the next billion-dollar computer company," said Mr. Jobs, who started Apple Computer Inc.His latest optimism has some foundation.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1991
TOKYO -- A week after Apple Computer put the finishing touches on a broad strategic alliance with IBM, it is quietly negotiating another major linkup, one that could blend U.S. and Japanese technological strengths.This time the partner would be Sony Corp.Senior executives of both companies have confirmed in recent days that discussions are under way about a new venture, but the details are closely guarded."I can't talk about it," John Sculley, Apple's chairman and chief executive, said yesterday, "other than that I am talking to Ohga this week."
BUSINESS
March 24, 1994
Martin pushes GrummanMartin Marietta Corp. has charged that Grumman Corp. would breach the companies' merger agreement if it fails to enforce the "standstill" provisions of an earlier pact with hostile bidder Northrop Corp., according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday.Earlier this month, Martin Marietta agreed to buy Grumman for $55 a share. Northrop, which had negotiated earlier to acquire Grumman, bested the offer three days later with a hostile bid of $60 a share.
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