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John Russell Pope

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Guest blog post by Mary Carole McCauley/The Baltimore Sun The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it will reopen its historic entrance to visitors on Nov. 23, 2014, in celebration of the museum's 100th anniversary. The elegant portico roof designed in 1929 by the great American architect John Russell Pope is supported by six Ionic columns. The entrance, which is reached at the top of a flight of stairs, seems to float above the surrounding terrain. The exterior lighting is being updated, and after the renovation, the stairs will be used as a meeting place for visitors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Guest blog post by Mary Carole McCauley/The Baltimore Sun The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it will reopen its historic entrance to visitors on Nov. 23, 2014, in celebration of the museum's 100th anniversary. The elegant portico roof designed in 1929 by the great American architect John Russell Pope is supported by six Ionic columns. The entrance, which is reached at the top of a flight of stairs, seems to float above the surrounding terrain. The exterior lighting is being updated, and after the renovation, the stairs will be used as a meeting place for visitors.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it has chosen the local architectural firm of Ziger/Snead to lead a $24 million renovation of the neoclassical museum building, which houses 90,000 pieces of art, including the world's largest collection of works by Henri Matisse. The Mount Vernon-based firm has designed several distinctive Baltimore buildings, including the angular, white-glass-paneled Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Living Classroom Foundation's headquarters overlooking the harbor in Fells Point.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it has chosen the local architectural firm of Ziger/Snead to lead a $24 million renovation of the neoclassical museum building, which houses 90,000 pieces of art, including the world's largest collection of works by Henri Matisse. The Mount Vernon-based firm has designed several distinctive Baltimore buildings, including the angular, white-glass-paneled Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Living Classroom Foundation's headquarters overlooking the harbor in Fells Point.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
IN THE CURRENT CLIMATE, an artist who painted a 6-year-old girl nude, sitting playfully on a chair, might be accused of exploiting young children, despite the innocence portrayed. But William Sergeant Kendall painted his daughter Beatrice as "Mischief" in 1908. It was the first work acquired by the embryonic Baltimore Museum of Art, given by a founder, A. R. L. Dohme, in 1914. Dr. Dohme's own daughter, Adelyn (Breeskin), grew up to be the BMA's director from 1947 to 1962, attracting its greatest collections and making the BMA a force in modern art.Kendall's "Mischief" is just one of many surprises and delights in the reopened 19 galleries of pre-1925 American painting and decorative art at the BMA. They fill the original building designed by John Russell Pope, which was opened in 1929 and closed the past two years for renovation.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
THE INSTITUTIONAL impact of the exhibit of Joyce J. Scott's work at the Baltimore Museum of Art is not on view. Yet it's significant that this large show and sumptuous catalog are jointly produced by the museum and the Maryland Institute, College of Art. A few years ago, the BMA and MICA together spelled only trouble. They were at each other's throats over the right of one to sell art stored in the other. Fortunately, that was resolved with generous state intervention. That set the stage for unprecedented coopertion spearheaded by museum Director Doreen Bolger and art school President Fred Lazarus IV. Such synergy between art school and museum strengthens Baltimore as an art center.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | June 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As millions of tourists know, the nation's capital is a city of monuments. But it's also a city of art museums. Some 16 diverse institutions offer the proverbial something for everyone -- from European Old Masters to the traditional arts of Asia and Africa; from crafts and folk art to international contemporary expression.Washington is, as the Simon and Schuster Pocket Art Museum guide proclaims, one of the "pleasantest" places to look at. Many museums are housed in grand beaux-arts buildings or in charming old homes.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 1, 2004
John Russell Pope, architect of the Baltimore Museum of Art's elegant neoclassical building at 31st and Charles streets, was the leading proponent of classical-revival style of his era. Opened in 1929, the BMA's first permanent home was also Pope's first museum commission, and it set the standard for many of the large public buildings he would create. Pope went on to design some of Washington's most distinctive structures, including the National Gallery of Art, Constitution Hall, the Jefferson Memorial, the Temple of the Scottish Rite and the National Archives building.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1994
William McMillan, a Baltimore architect and yachtsman who was responsible for saving the dome of the administration building at Johns Hopkins Hospital from demolition, died March 22 of cancer at Sunny Hill Farm, his home near Glyndon.He was 89.He was a trustee of Hopkins Hospital from 1938 to 1979 and was chairman of the building committee from 1949 to 1973.It was during his tenure on the building committee that he saved from destruction the John Shaw Billings Administration Building and its dome, which has become the symbol of the East Baltimore medical complex.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
The former home of the company that invented the Ouija board, the estate of Calvert School's first headmaster and one of the city's last Masonic temples are among 12 buildings that have joined Baltimore's official landmark list. Marking May as "Preservation Month," Mayor Sheila Dixon held a news conference Wednesday morning at which she signed legislation adding the buildings to the landmark list and opened an exhibit about them in the North Gallery of City Hall. The additions bring to 153 the number of buildings that have individual city landmark designation, a status that helps protect them from demolition or defacement.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
The Baltimore Museum of Art won't open its New Wing for Modern Art until Oct. 16, but directors are already planning their next construction project.Starting next spring, the museum will replace the roof of the original 1929 museum building by John Russell Pope and others and repair the roof of the adjacent 1937 Jacobs wing, at a cost of $2.2 million.All works of art in those areas will be removed for safekeeping while the work is under way, and the galleries will be reorganized once repairs are complete.
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