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John Ritter

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December 17, 2005
Critic's Pick-- The late John Ritter (above) takes a rare turn as a villain, a man suspected of killing his wife, in Lethal Vows (9 p.m.-11 p.m., Lifetime).
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 5, 2009
John L. Ritter Sr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. engineering manager who was active in Scouting, died of complications from an infection May 27 at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Reisterstown resident was 81. Mr. Ritter was born in Baltimore and raised in Ten Hills. He was a 1948 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington. Mr. Ritter's career at C&P spanned 39 years as an engineering manager. He retired in 1991. He served with the 29th Infantry of the Maryland National Guard from 1948 to 1953, attaining the rank of master sergeant.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 1, 1991
There are a bunch of problems with "The Summer My Father Grew Up," the NBC Sunday night movie at 9 on WMAR (Channel 2).But, despite all the problems, it is one of those made-for-TV movies that works on a level that has almost nothing to do with traditional calls of "good" or "bad."It's a movie that is going to get to some viewers. It will put a lump in their throats and possibly make them pause to think about their own lives and relationships."The Summer My Father Grew Up" stars John Ritter as Dr. Paul Sanford, the father who grows up. Matthew Lawrence has the other lead role; as Timmy Sanford, he's the son who helps his father grow up.The plot is a simple one. Paul and his wife, Naomi (Margaret Whitton)
FEATURES
December 17, 2005
Critic's Pick-- The late John Ritter (above) takes a rare turn as a villain, a man suspected of killing his wife, in Lethal Vows (9 p.m.-11 p.m., Lifetime).
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 21, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Michael Caine, Carol Burnett, John Ritter, Julie Hagerty, Christopher Reeve, Denholm Elliott and Mark Linn-Baker will star in Hollywood Pictures' film adaptation of "Noises Off," Michael Frayn's stage farce.Director Peter Bogdanovich begins production in early spring, possibly in Santa Barbara, Calif., of the humorous behind-the-scenes tale of a bedraggled British theater company touring the provinces.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2004
Clifford's Really Big Movie brings the Big Red Dog, beloved by children from Norman Bridwell's books and the TV series, to the screen with style and charm, carefully tailored to preschool-to-first-grade sensibilities. As a work of animation, the film has simple, straightforward graphics and a rich palette of colors. As his fans know, the gigantic Clifford (voiced by the late John Ritter), who has the look of a towering Great Dane, is the pet of little blond Emily Elizabeth (Grey DeLisle)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,Chicago Tribune | July 5, 1991
In their infinite wisdom, the Classification and Rating Administration of the Motion Picture Association of America recently created the NC-17 rating: No Children Under Seventeen Admitted.What we need now, if only so it can be applied to "Problem Child 2," is a NA-12 designation: No one over 12, or the mental age thereof, permitted past the candy counter."Problem Child 2," as directed by TV veteran Brian Levant and written by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, is a more or less steady stream of the gross-out jokes loved by all children in the immediate neighborhood of puberty.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
The best thing on TV tonight: A 40-year-old sitcom repeat with Harpo Marx and Lucille Ball. If you've never seen it, do. If you've seen it before, enjoy it again."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 15, 1992
"Stay Tuned" is an elaborate and ambitious attempt to look at the zany world of cable TV.Do the words "it stinks" mean anything to you?There are more laughs to be experienced aimlessly hitting the remote in the hours after midnight and flashing through Lost Combination Cable Network and SuperStation 99 from downtown Omaha and Total War Cable Network and Old, Bad Western Theater than in any single instant of "Stay Tuned."Did the money men behind this piece of cheese look at the record of director-photographer Peter Hyams, which is one long bland litany of mediocrity -- "2010: The Sequel," "The Star Chamber," "Running Scared" -- as well as being utterly devoid of humor?
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | May 7, 1992
It's been a wacky high school baseball season, but Severna Park got just plain whacked yesterday.Chesapeake handed the Falcons a mind-blowing 13-7 loss to avenge an earlier 10-5 setback.To break a 7-7 tie, the Cougars had seven hits, including three of their four triples on the day, and two home runs in a six-run fifth inning.Their 14 hits in the game came against three different pitchers, including the Falcons' No. 2 hurler, John Ritter (6-2).The Falcons were rocked most by senior center fielder Mike O'Brien, who went 3-for-5 with eight RBI, and lacked only a double to hit for the cycle.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2004
Clifford's Really Big Movie brings the Big Red Dog, beloved by children from Norman Bridwell's books and the TV series, to the screen with style and charm, carefully tailored to preschool-to-first-grade sensibilities. As a work of animation, the film has simple, straightforward graphics and a rich palette of colors. As his fans know, the gigantic Clifford (voiced by the late John Ritter), who has the look of a towering Great Dane, is the pet of little blond Emily Elizabeth (Grey DeLisle)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 28, 2002
Movies developed from the inside out can reawaken memories as private and intimate as those usually jogged by poetry or fiction. That happened when I was watching Tadpole. Gary Winick's movie stars Aaron Stanford as Oscar Grubman, a 15-year-old preppie who has fallen in love with his stepmother, Eve (Sigourney Weaver). The movie begins with him on a train, returning home for Thanksgiving break; this oh-so-literary boy buries his nose in his favorite author, Voltaire, dismisses everything his best friend Charlie (Robert Iler)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 23, 2000
Why do fools fall out of love? That's the central question posed by Neil Simon's 31st and latest play, "The Dinner Party." Part farce and part mystery, the play is unusual for Simon not only because of its hybrid form but also because of its shift in tone. Although "The Dinner Party" starts out as a laugh fest, it ends on a bittersweet note, rather like a meal that begins with dessert and ends with an entrM-ie so highly seasoned, it makes your eyes water. The result, receiving an appealing East Coast premiere at Washington's Kennedy Center, may not be a major work, but it is highly enjoyable - a divertissement that, while light, leaves you pondering the complexities and perplexities of love and romance.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
The best thing on TV tonight: A 40-year-old sitcom repeat with Harpo Marx and Lucille Ball. If you've never seen it, do. If you've seen it before, enjoy it again."
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | August 28, 1992
It's been a while, sports fans, but questions without answers are back.Your input is what makes the "Q's and A's" column. All you have to do is call the 24-hour Sportsline, 647-2499, and fire away. Your comments, answers or big "Q's" are always welcome.* Did you hear that about 55 players showed up for Wednesday's baseball tryouts for the 13th annual Anne Arundel County Sun-Oriolelanders All-Star baseball game at Joe Cannon Stadium in Harmans?Players ages 15 to 21 came out in hopes of being named to the Arundel Suns, who will play the Oriolelanders, a hand-picked team of players from the state and mid-Atlantic area, on Sept.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 15, 1992
"Stay Tuned" is an elaborate and ambitious attempt to look at the zany world of cable TV.Do the words "it stinks" mean anything to you?There are more laughs to be experienced aimlessly hitting the remote in the hours after midnight and flashing through Lost Combination Cable Network and SuperStation 99 from downtown Omaha and Total War Cable Network and Old, Bad Western Theater than in any single instant of "Stay Tuned."Did the money men behind this piece of cheese look at the record of director-photographer Peter Hyams, which is one long bland litany of mediocrity -- "2010: The Sequel," "The Star Chamber," "Running Scared" -- as well as being utterly devoid of humor?
FEATURES
By Michael HIll | March 6, 1991
If you read the sports pages these days, you see a lot about college basketball teams that are "on the bubble." That means they are decent teams that may or may not get an invitation to take a dip in the money river known as the NCAA basketball tournament. A good performance in one of the various season-ending tournaments is crucial to keeping the bubble intact.But it's not only basketball teams that are on the bubble these days. Next month the three networks will begin deciding which series will stay and which will go as they remake their prime time schedules for the fall.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 23, 2000
Why do fools fall out of love? That's the central question posed by Neil Simon's 31st and latest play, "The Dinner Party." Part farce and part mystery, the play is unusual for Simon not only because of its hybrid form but also because of its shift in tone. Although "The Dinner Party" starts out as a laugh fest, it ends on a bittersweet note, rather like a meal that begins with dessert and ends with an entrM-ie so highly seasoned, it makes your eyes water. The result, receiving an appealing East Coast premiere at Washington's Kennedy Center, may not be a major work, but it is highly enjoyable - a divertissement that, while light, leaves you pondering the complexities and perplexities of love and romance.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | May 7, 1992
It's been a wacky high school baseball season, but Severna Park got just plain whacked yesterday.Chesapeake handed the Falcons a mind-blowing 13-7 loss to avenge an earlier 10-5 setback.To break a 7-7 tie, the Cougars had seven hits, including three of their four triples on the day, and two home runs in a six-run fifth inning.Their 14 hits in the game came against three different pitchers, including the Falcons' No. 2 hurler, John Ritter (6-2).The Falcons were rocked most by senior center fielder Mike O'Brien, who went 3-for-5 with eight RBI, and lacked only a double to hit for the cycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,Chicago Tribune | July 5, 1991
In their infinite wisdom, the Classification and Rating Administration of the Motion Picture Association of America recently created the NC-17 rating: No Children Under Seventeen Admitted.What we need now, if only so it can be applied to "Problem Child 2," is a NA-12 designation: No one over 12, or the mental age thereof, permitted past the candy counter."Problem Child 2," as directed by TV veteran Brian Levant and written by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, is a more or less steady stream of the gross-out jokes loved by all children in the immediate neighborhood of puberty.
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