Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Quincy Adams
IN THE NEWS

John Quincy Adams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | December 14, 1997
He knew Washington and Lincoln. As a boy, he stood with his mother on a Boston knoll and witnessed the Battle of Bunker Hill; later he would serve as a U.S. ambassador to King George III, the monarch against whom we had rebelled.He had set eyes on Napoleon Bonaparte and the Duke of Wellington, victor over Napoleon at Waterloo. He had his portrait painted by John Singleton Copley and Gilbert Stuart - and lived long enough to be photographed by Matthew Brady.He was acquainted with each of the first 16 presidents of the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
I am romping through* Fred Kaplan's recent biography of John Quincy Adams, and I offer you this sentence from Adams in 1801: "There is not a party in this country with which an honest man can act without blushing. " From the dawn of the Republic to the present day, a thread of continuity.      *I plead nolo contendere to an additional count of nerdity.   
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1997
Now that it's spring haircut time for dogs, sheep and horses, animal groomers across the country reach for the clipper blades sharpened by a fastidious craftsman who grinds away his days in a Hampden carriage house.John Quincy Adams hones a fine edge destined for the silky coats of Pimlico and Churchill Downs chestnuts and bays. While his buzzing trimmers help earn blue ribbons for pedigreed show dogs at the Westminster Kennel Club, many an Overlea backyard pooch's winter coat also has been thinned with his steel edges.
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | October 22, 2007
During a visit in 1827, John Quincy Adams described Baltimore as "the Monumental City." Nearly two centuries years later, it is still easy to see why. Monuments abound in the city. "To the Memory of the Unknown Dead," erected by the Women's Relief Corps Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, sits in the National Cemetery. One standout statue sits at the Clifton Park golf course - "On the Trail," a statue of a Native American that was donated in 1916.
FEATURES
February 9, 2006
Feb. 9 1825: The House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams president after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. 1870: The U.S. Weather Bureau was established. 1964: The Beatles made their first live American television appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on CBS.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
I am romping through* Fred Kaplan's recent biography of John Quincy Adams, and I offer you this sentence from Adams in 1801: "There is not a party in this country with which an honest man can act without blushing. " From the dawn of the Republic to the present day, a thread of continuity.      *I plead nolo contendere to an additional count of nerdity.   
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | October 22, 2007
During a visit in 1827, John Quincy Adams described Baltimore as "the Monumental City." Nearly two centuries years later, it is still easy to see why. Monuments abound in the city. "To the Memory of the Unknown Dead," erected by the Women's Relief Corps Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, sits in the National Cemetery. One standout statue sits at the Clifton Park golf course - "On the Trail," a statue of a Native American that was donated in 1916.
FEATURES
February 23, 2000
Today in history: Feb. 23 In 1836, the siege of the Alamo began in San Antonio, Texas. In 1848, the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy Adams, died of a stroke at age 80. In 1861, President-elect Lincoln arrived secretly in Washington to take office, an assassination plot having been foiled in Baltimore. In 1927, President Coolidge signed a bill creating the Federal Radio Commission, forerunner of the Federal Communications Commission. In 1954, the first mass inoculation of children with the Salk polio vaccine began, in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | February 9, 2000
NO ONE who has noticed Bill Clinton's life has been roughly coincident with his running for public office will be surprised to hear him musing about running for Congress once his sentence in the White House is completed. But why run in Arkansas? Isn't that a bit of a commute from Chappaqua, N.Y.? Still, it would be something, having the prodigal home, campaigning at Toadsuck Ferry, handling folks' problems with Social Security or the IRS. He might even be able to attract some new government installation located in Arkansas after all these years.
NEWS
January 10, 1999
Ntsu Mokhehle, a former prime minister considered the most influential politician in modern Lesotho, died Wednesday after falling ill in Maseru, Lesotho, two weeks ago during celebrations to mark his 80th birthday.Charles Francis Adams, 88, retired chairman of Raytheon Co. and a descendant of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, died Tuesday in Dover, Mass.Jose Vela Zanetti, 85, a Spanish painter best known for his mural depicting human rights at United Nations headquarters in New York, died Monday in Madrid.
FEATURES
February 9, 2006
Feb. 9 1825: The House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams president after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. 1870: The U.S. Weather Bureau was established. 1964: The Beatles made their first live American television appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on CBS.
NEWS
By DONALD B. COLE and DONALD B. COLE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
ANDREW JACKSON: HIS LIFE AND TIMES H.W. Brands Doubleday / 640 pages For Andrew Jackson, life was always a struggle: to survive the loss of his father andmother, tomake a career in the West, to crush the Creek Indians, to defend New Orleans, to oust the Spanish and, finally, to win the presidency and defend his administration. A sensitive, short-tempered man of honor, Jackson imagined slights, manufactured enemies and challengedmen to duels. He sometimes found enemies on his own side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Louis P. Masur and Louis P. Masur,Chicago Tribune | January 4, 2004
The Stranger and the Statesman: James Smithson, John Quincy Adams, and the Making of America's Greatest Museum: the Smithsonian, by Nina Burleigh. HarperCollins. 320 pages. $24.95. The Smithsonian Institution is vast. It consists of 16 museums, seven research centers, the National Zoo and, according to its Web site, collections of "objects, artworks and specimens" totaling more than 142 million items. There are also 129 affiliate museums that help allow the "the nation's attic" to display its holdings.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
Lionel Wilson, 79, the voice of Tom Terrific, Mighty Manfred the Wonder Dog, Crabby Appleton and all the other characters of the "Tom Terrific" cartoons on the Captain Kangaroo children's television show, died of pneumonia April 30 in Manhattan. "Tom Terrific," produced by Terrytoons from 1957 to 1959, followed the adventures of a young superhero who wore a funnel for a hat and could change shape at will. Each story centered on the efforts of the exuberant and wildly imaginative "greatest hero ever" to save the lazy Manfred from villains like Crabby Appleton, a meanie who was "rotten to the core" and did a bad deed every day. Mr. Wilson provided the voices for numerous other cartoons, appearing most recently as Eustace in the Cartoon Network's Courage the Cowardly Dog. He also recorded dozens of children's books on tape and CD, including Wayside School stories by Louis Sachar.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
QUINCY, Mass. -- After weeks of crowds like she had never seen at the historic home of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and their descendants, National Park Service ranger Nancy Yourell welcomed a new group hurrying up for a tour: "Welcome to the David McCullough National Historic Site." No one corrected her because, of course, they were there thanks to McCullough. Or, more precisely, because of his acclaimed 2001 biography of John Adams, the second president of the United States, which won a Pulitzer Prize and has single-handedly turned the Adams attraction into one of the hottest landmarks in the National Park Service collection.
NEWS
By Jim Bendat | January 11, 2001
LOS ANGELES -- Traditionally on the morning of the inauguration, the outgoing president greets the president-elect at the White House. The two men pose for pictures with their wives, then have some private time together over juice, coffee and pastries. After about an hour, they ride together to the Capitol for the inauguration ceremony. The outgoing president will sit on the right side in the rear passenger seat while the incoming president will sit on the left. The crowds along Pennsylvania Avenue generally cheer for both men with much patriotic enthusiasm.
NEWS
By Chuck Myers of Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 16, 1996
Q: How many presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected as the country's chief executive?A: Fifteen presidents served as a U.S. senator before they were elected to office. They are: John Quincy Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, Benjamin Harrison, Warren Harding, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.One president, James A. Garfield, was actually elected simultaneously as president of the United States and a senator from Ohio in 1880.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | December 18, 2000
GEORGE W. BUSH is the third son or grandson of a president to be elected president. All so far -- fathers and heirs -- had one-term, failed presidencies. They are John and John Quincy Adams, William Henry and Benjamin Harrison, and George H.W. and George W. Bush. John Adams' immortality as a Founding Father obscures his mediocrity as president. He was elected in 1796 after George Washington refused a third term. Adams was notable for his tilt toward Britain against France (reversed by Thomas Jefferson)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.