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By John Koenig | January 6, 1991
Imagine the daughter of a prominent Baltimore family climbing a high flagpole during a wild party at a staid suburban country club, or, at another party, the son of a well-known local physician flinging the contents of a highball glass in the face of a man he did not like.Unimaginable in Baltimore? Of course. Unbelievable at the Schuylkill Country Club at Pottsville, Pa.? Well, maybe. If such things did occur, they should not be mentioned in journalism nor in journalistic-type novel-writing, thought the people of Pottsville.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
In a recent column, my colleague Kevin Cowherd mentioned Annapolis-born author James M. Cain, whose steamy, hard-boiled crime novels filled with love, sex and murder, written in the 1930s and '40s, are still capable of generating enough heat reminiscent of a summer's day in Baltimore. Cain, whose blockbuster novels - The Postman Always Rings Twice, Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce and Serenade - will always define his career and a time, considered himself nothing more than a newspaperman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
The Art of Burning Bridges: A Life of John O'Hara, by Geoffrey Wolff. Knopf. 400 pages. $30. John O'Hara was probably the 20th century's most prolific serious, good, underappreciated-by-his-peers writer. When Modern Library included his Appointment in Samarra on its list of the 20th century's 100 best English language novels, Benjamin and Christina Schwartz wrote in the Atlantic Monthly that "so widespread is the literary world's scorn for" him that the choice was widely, wrongly used "to ridicule the entire project."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
The Art of Burning Bridges: A Life of John O'Hara, by Geoffrey Wolff. Knopf. 400 pages. $30. John O'Hara was probably the 20th century's most prolific serious, good, underappreciated-by-his-peers writer. When Modern Library included his Appointment in Samarra on its list of the 20th century's 100 best English language novels, Benjamin and Christina Schwartz wrote in the Atlantic Monthly that "so widespread is the literary world's scorn for" him that the choice was widely, wrongly used "to ridicule the entire project."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
John O'Hara, the prolific American writer who chronicled in his novels, novellas, short stories and plays the foibles and intimate lives of the small-town rich as well as colorful racketeers and underworld punks, died 31 years ago this week at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was 65. "Appointment in Samara," the 1934 blockbuster novel that rocketed him to fame, was oddly enough the only O'Hara work on the shelf at Borders during a recent visit. The tightly constructed and fast-paced novel, which was an instant success when published, was set in the fictional Eastern Pennsylvania town of Gibbsville, based on O'Hara's hometown of Pottsville, Pa. It was a place he would return to often in his fiction and would ultimately be the center of his work.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
About 6,200 Howard County residents will have to put out their trash and recyclables on a new day of the week when the county's waste collection contracts are renewed July 1.Waste haulers are distributing the information -- packaged in plastic bags hung on doors -- to affected residents around the county.The rescheduled areas include Allview Estates, Savage, North Laurel, Huntington, Columbia's Long Reach and Owen Brown villages, and Elkridge's Meadowridge and Mayfield areas. Only certain homes in those areas face the change.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
In a recent column, my colleague Kevin Cowherd mentioned Annapolis-born author James M. Cain, whose steamy, hard-boiled crime novels filled with love, sex and murder, written in the 1930s and '40s, are still capable of generating enough heat reminiscent of a summer's day in Baltimore. Cain, whose blockbuster novels - The Postman Always Rings Twice, Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce and Serenade - will always define his career and a time, considered himself nothing more than a newspaperman.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
The Orioles aren't the only attraction at the ballpark. There are eccentric fans, memorable vendors and colorful traditions. In this installment of Baseball Journal, meet beer hawker Perry Hahn, known to many as "Robo-Vendor."Up in the center-field bleachers, Perry Hahn -- beer vendor, mechanical engineer, inventor -- is creating the usual stir. He's trying to peddle beer, but fans keep asking all kinds of questions about his invention, about all those wires hanging on his body.A woman from Charlottesville, Va., sensing that this lanky figure with the electric can opener in his left fist is an American original, wants to snap his picture.
NEWS
December 12, 2005
On December 10, 2005 BETTY J. SEITZ (nee Baldwin) beloved wife of the late Joseph Seitz Sr., devoted mother of Joseph Seitz Jr., and Margaret Jones, dear grandmother of Michael O'Hara, John O'Hara, Jacqueline Seitz and Matthew Seitz. Friends may call at the family owned Bruzdzinski Funeral Home P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex, at Rt 702, (beltway Exit 36) on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service on Tuesday 9 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
On March 8, 2006, ANNIE W. O'HARA (nee Walker); beloved wife of John J. O'Hara, Jr., devoted mother of John J. O'Hara, III and his wife Carol Baumerich, Virginia O. Slabik and her husband Michael, Bruce W. O'Hara and his wife Jo Ann, dear grandmother of Kathleen B., Suzanne B., Ryan W., Richard S. and Robert J. O'Hara. Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 PM. A Memorial Service will be celebrated at the Faith Presbyterian Church (Loch Raven Blvd.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
John O'Hara, the prolific American writer who chronicled in his novels, novellas, short stories and plays the foibles and intimate lives of the small-town rich as well as colorful racketeers and underworld punks, died 31 years ago this week at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was 65. "Appointment in Samara," the 1934 blockbuster novel that rocketed him to fame, was oddly enough the only O'Hara work on the shelf at Borders during a recent visit. The tightly constructed and fast-paced novel, which was an instant success when published, was set in the fictional Eastern Pennsylvania town of Gibbsville, based on O'Hara's hometown of Pottsville, Pa. It was a place he would return to often in his fiction and would ultimately be the center of his work.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
About 6,200 Howard County residents will have to put out their trash and recyclables on a new day of the week when the county's waste collection contracts are renewed July 1.Waste haulers are distributing the information -- packaged in plastic bags hung on doors -- to affected residents around the county.The rescheduled areas include Allview Estates, Savage, North Laurel, Huntington, Columbia's Long Reach and Owen Brown villages, and Elkridge's Meadowridge and Mayfield areas. Only certain homes in those areas face the change.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
The Orioles aren't the only attraction at the ballpark. There are eccentric fans, memorable vendors and colorful traditions. In this installment of Baseball Journal, meet beer hawker Perry Hahn, known to many as "Robo-Vendor."Up in the center-field bleachers, Perry Hahn -- beer vendor, mechanical engineer, inventor -- is creating the usual stir. He's trying to peddle beer, but fans keep asking all kinds of questions about his invention, about all those wires hanging on his body.A woman from Charlottesville, Va., sensing that this lanky figure with the electric can opener in his left fist is an American original, wants to snap his picture.
FEATURES
By John Koenig | January 6, 1991
Imagine the daughter of a prominent Baltimore family climbing a high flagpole during a wild party at a staid suburban country club, or, at another party, the son of a well-known local physician flinging the contents of a highball glass in the face of a man he did not like.Unimaginable in Baltimore? Of course. Unbelievable at the Schuylkill Country Club at Pottsville, Pa.? Well, maybe. If such things did occur, they should not be mentioned in journalism nor in journalistic-type novel-writing, thought the people of Pottsville.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
Having spent a substantial portion of my career in the solid waste management field, I have followed with interest the debate regarding waste-to-energy facilities as renewable energy sources. I find it disconcerting that some environmental groups continue trying to aggressively discredit WTE incineration as a viable option. I am not a fan of solid waste management strategies based on a goal of "zero waste" generation. Such strategies sound good but are unrealistic. Effective waste management strategies need to be comprehensive, incorporating components for reuse, recycling, reduction, processing and disposal.
NEWS
October 26, 1992
Counties plan to join forces on trash disposalCOLUMBIA -- Howard County officials and their Baltimore-area counterparts are looking at ways to collaborate on the disposal, burning and marketing of trash, an idea that stalled last year when Howard and three other counties made a similar effort."
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