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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | April 28, 2002
You've seen the movie and lived through the Oscar hoopla surrounding A Beautiful Mind. Now in American Experience, PBS offers its take on Nobel Prize-winning mathematician and schizophrenic John Nash with A Brilliant Madness. Not surprisingly, real life is darker and a little more complicated than Hollywood's version. While the arc of the story is still that of the Hero Quest, A Brilliant Madness acknowledges some of the facts ignored and / or glossed over in the film: Nash's first marriage and the wife and child he appears to have callously abandoned; an episode after his first discharge from a prestigious private hospital in which he withdrew all his pension money and wandered around Europe attempting to renounce his American citizenship; his second wife divorcing him; and a period during which he was living essentially as a homeless person.
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NEWS
January 10, 2007
On December 5, 2006 ROMAINE ZEIGLER. Beloved mother of John and Ted Zeigler and beloved sister of Barbara Smith, John Nash, Bill Nash, Naomi Jones and Howard Nash passed away after a long illness. A Memorial Service will be offered on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at 3 P.M. at Poplar Grove United Methodist Church, 13600 Poplar Hill Rd., Phoenix, MD.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | March 24, 2002
Dr. William T. Carpenter Jr. , 65, is a leading world researcher on causes and treatments for schizophrenia at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The author of more than 200 clinical articles, he has directed the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center in Catonsville for 25 years. Researchers at the center have produced leading theories about the nature of the disease and tested treatments in clinical trials. At present they are investigating why most people with the disease are unable to work.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 24, 2004
SUN SCORE : ** With gung-ho verbal flourishes and fierce or poignant scowls, Liam Neeson sanctifies the crusading American sex researcher Alfred C. Kinsey in Kinsey. This human lightning rod from Indiana University becomes nothing more than a genitalia-obsessed heir to the sentimentalized intellectual crusaders of Hollywood yore. Paul Muni's Louis Pasteur and Emile Zola - along with Russell Crowe's recent portrait of John Nash - can't rival the Kinsey of this movie in either beneficence or controversy.
NEWS
January 10, 2007
On December 5, 2006 ROMAINE ZEIGLER. Beloved mother of John and Ted Zeigler and beloved sister of Barbara Smith, John Nash, Bill Nash, Naomi Jones and Howard Nash passed away after a long illness. A Memorial Service will be offered on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at 3 P.M. at Poplar Grove United Methodist Church, 13600 Poplar Hill Rd., Phoenix, MD.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 31, 2002
BOSTON - The Oscars are all tucked into their new homes and the red carpet - OK, the cranberry carpet - is rolled up for another year. But before this event recedes into the History of the Academy Awards, could we take one last look at the history of history? In the run-up to the glitzy event, many in Hollywood described 2002 as the year of the smear. A campaign, or so they said, was launched to discredit A Beautiful Mind on the grounds that the John Nash on the screen was not the John Nash in real life.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | October 20, 1994
It has been five seasons since the Dallas Mavericks had a winning record, yet No. 2 pick Jason Kidd has gotten their fans excited. In Detroit, there's a feeling the Pistons could begin a turnaround with the addition of No. 3 pick Grant Hill. Though no one expects miracles in Minnesota, the Timberwolves have improved with the signing of No. 4 pick Donyell Marshall.And somewhere in the Washington Bullets' offices, there's a No. 5 jersey with the name "Howard" stitched on the back. But itdoesn't look like Juwan Howard, the No. 5 pick of the draft, will be in uniform any time soon.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
Broadneck coach Ken Kazmarek said his players have stayed focused and maintained their composure this season during the most trying times.They were put to the test last night in the Class 3A East Region final against No. 19 Douglass of Baltimore.Three Douglass players were ejected. The Ducks were assessed four technical fouls, two intentional fouls and one flagrant foul. Their leading scorer, senior Lamar Prilliman, threw a punch at Broadneck's Eric Elston during a melee that had fans spilling onto the court.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
BOWIE -- In a final attempt to sign No. 1 draft choice Tom Gugliotta, Washington Bullets general manager John Nash yesterday compared the team's five-year $10.725 million offer made to the North Carolina State forward to the five-year, $7.3 million dollar deal Stanford forward Adam Keefe signed with the Atlanta Hawks on Friday.Keefe, the 10th player chosen in the 1992 NBA draft and the first lottery pick to sign, was once thought to be the Bullets' first choice among the blue-chip players available with their sixth pick.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
LANDOVER -- Ten days ago at the Capital Centre, Buck Johnson was walking in one door of the Washington Bullets' office while Ledell Eackles was walking out another.At the time, the symbolism surely was lost on Johnson. But, yesterday, when he was introduced to the media as the newest Bullet, Johnson had to realize he was being counted on to replace Eackles as the team's starting small forward this season.General manager John Nash made no secret of that."Right now, if we had to name a starting lineup," Nash said, "I'd say we'd be starting Johnson up front with Harvey Grant and Pervis Ellison, with Michael Adams and Rex Chapman in the backcourt.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 14, 2002
I MANAGED to separate reality from paranoid hallucination in A Beautiful Mind during the car-chase scene, with Ed Harris behind the wheel of a black sedan, Russell Crowe his passenger, and Commie black-bag men shooting at them as they sped through the streets of Cambridge or Boston. That's when I understood the fine trick being played by the makers of the film. No brag, that. I'm no puzzle master. I just knew that if commie agents had tried to kill a couple of Americans, including an MIT professor, during a spectacular car chase in the 1950s, the event would have made large news and held up as Cold War history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | April 28, 2002
You've seen the movie and lived through the Oscar hoopla surrounding A Beautiful Mind. Now in American Experience, PBS offers its take on Nobel Prize-winning mathematician and schizophrenic John Nash with A Brilliant Madness. Not surprisingly, real life is darker and a little more complicated than Hollywood's version. While the arc of the story is still that of the Hero Quest, A Brilliant Madness acknowledges some of the facts ignored and / or glossed over in the film: Nash's first marriage and the wife and child he appears to have callously abandoned; an episode after his first discharge from a prestigious private hospital in which he withdrew all his pension money and wandered around Europe attempting to renounce his American citizenship; his second wife divorcing him; and a period during which he was living essentially as a homeless person.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 31, 2002
BOSTON - The Oscars are all tucked into their new homes and the red carpet - OK, the cranberry carpet - is rolled up for another year. But before this event recedes into the History of the Academy Awards, could we take one last look at the history of history? In the run-up to the glitzy event, many in Hollywood described 2002 as the year of the smear. A campaign, or so they said, was launched to discredit A Beautiful Mind on the grounds that the John Nash on the screen was not the John Nash in real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | March 24, 2002
Dr. William T. Carpenter Jr. , 65, is a leading world researcher on causes and treatments for schizophrenia at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The author of more than 200 clinical articles, he has directed the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center in Catonsville for 25 years. Researchers at the center have produced leading theories about the nature of the disease and tested treatments in clinical trials. At present they are investigating why most people with the disease are unable to work.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 1997
Herman Harried fondly remembered the the early 1980s when he played for a team coached by Woody Williams that beat a team coached by Bob Wade at the Five-Star summer camp. Harried, a key member of Dunbar's 1982-83 mythical national championship team played against Williams, when he was coach of rival Lake Clifton.They were again on opposite benches yesterday as Harried, in his first season as coach of Lake Clifton, faced Williams, now coaching at Mervo, in the championship game of the John Nash Holiday Tournament at Douglass.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1997
Mervo coach Woody Williams was little concerned with his team's No. 18 preseason ranking and those who felt his team would be a contender in the City East division.Despite having three returning starters, Williams wasn't sure if the Mustangs were mature enough to respond in challenging situations.But if yesterday's 71-70 victory over host and No. 15 Douglass in the first round of the John Nash Holiday Tournament is an indication, No. 14 Mervo is showing signs of coming together.Trailing by three points with two minutes left after leading for the most of the game, Mervo scored the last four points to advance to today's 3 p.m. championship game against No. 6 Lake Clifton.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
LANDOVER -- When looking at Washington Bullets general manager John Nash, there is little doubt he is a man with a wearing job.His brown eyes are puffy, with dark circles ringing them. He sits down for a 4:30 p.m. interview at 8 o'clock and apologizes for having to make it so late.His schedule is like that. He is a man on the go. Coach Wes Unseld said last night he fears for the man's ears. "He has a phone growing out of one of them," Unseld said, only half in jest.Nash is the man who has accepted the responsibility of rebuilding the Bullets into a title contender.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 16, 1991
LANDOVER -- Working in his varied front-office positions in college and pro basketball, hockey and horse racing, John Nash has fulfilled a number of strange requests. None, however, quite matched the assignment he received in 1969 from then-Philadelphia 76ers business manager Pat Williams."I was Pat's assistant," said Nash, now the Washington Bullets general manager. "Between us, we handled everything concerning the business end of the team."Williams [now general manager of the Orlando Magic]
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
Broadneck coach Ken Kazmarek said his players have stayed focused and maintained their composure this season during the most trying times.They were put to the test last night in the Class 3A East Region final against No. 19 Douglass of Baltimore.Three Douglass players were ejected. The Ducks were assessed four technical fouls, two intentional fouls and one flagrant foul. Their leading scorer, senior Lamar Prilliman, threw a punch at Broadneck's Eric Elston during a melee that had fans spilling onto the court.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD | January 24, 1995
After more than 30 years of service at Douglass High, John Nash has decided that he will retire following the spring athletic season."I've been in this school building for a total of 30 years, and in coaching for about 35," said Nash, 60, who has been the athletic director for 15 years.He also has coached basketball, baseball and football at the school."My knees are telling me, and my entire body, mind and, I guess, father time is telling me that I'm no longer able to be as active as I once was. It's time now to go out."
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