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John Morgan

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NEWS
February 13, 2006
Kelly St. John Morgan, an Annapolis bartender with a big personality and a love of storytelling, died Feb. 5 at his father's home of complications from kidney disease. He was 46. Mr. Morgan, a lifelong Annapolis resident, graduated in 1977 from Wroxeter-on-Severn School, a now-defunct private school where he had played lacrosse. His passion for the sport never waned - four of his nieces and nephews were serious lacrosse players and he was a regular at their high school games. Mr. Morgan worked at a number of local bars and restaurants, most recently at the Eastport Clipper.
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By C. Philip Nichols Jr | February 7, 2013
I read with great interest your article Jan. 31 about Laurel's first bank robbery by John Morgan. Sadly, this was not our last bank robbery and just as sadly, not the last 19-year-old to go to prison from our county. A quick review by the state archivist, Dr. Edwin Papenfuse, brings us the "rest of the story. " (By the way, if every part of government was as efficient or accommodating as the state archives, there would not be much to complain about.) The Hon. Chief Judge John P. Briscoe of our Circuit Court sentenced Morgan to five years in the state penitentiary, notwithstanding the recommendation for leniency by the bank president, Charles H. Stanley Sr. Several months later, Morgan's sister Gertrude, who was a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital, applied to the governor to pardon her brother.
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NEWS
October 23, 1995
REPUBLICAN DEL. John S. Morgan of Laurel has made it official: He will battle veteran Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer next year for Maryland's Fifth Congressional District seat. Mr. Hoyer, first elected to the office in 1981, overcame strong Republican challenges in 1990 and 1992. However, the conservative lay of the land in the newly redrawn Fifth District, the ascendancy of the right in American politics and Mr. Morgan's considerable assets probably mean Mr. Hoyer is in for his toughest fight yet.In the 1980s, when it mostly comprised Prince George's County, the Fifth was reliably Democratic.
NEWS
February 13, 2006
Kelly St. John Morgan, an Annapolis bartender with a big personality and a love of storytelling, died Feb. 5 at his father's home of complications from kidney disease. He was 46. Mr. Morgan, a lifelong Annapolis resident, graduated in 1977 from Wroxeter-on-Severn School, a now-defunct private school where he had played lacrosse. His passion for the sport never waned - four of his nieces and nephews were serious lacrosse players and he was a regular at their high school games. Mr. Morgan worked at a number of local bars and restaurants, most recently at the Eastport Clipper.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
On a routine Friday night, John Morgan nursed a quart of cheap Popov vodka and cooked himself pork chops for dinner.He was living alone in a 16-foot-long camper trailer on Estelle Monks' rural spread in Cockeysville. It was a bitterly cold night. A space heater -- as well as the stove -- was plugged into an extension cord that ran from the trailer to a nearby shed.On Saturday morning, Feb. 12, firefighters found the body of John Patrick Morgan, 37, on his back near the trailer's front door.
NEWS
October 17, 2004
On October 14, 2004, ROY CLAYTON beloved husband of Blanch I. (nee Mills), devoted father of Dolores Morgan and her husband the late John H. Morgan and R. Kenneth Dodson and his wife Dawn C., dear brother of Santa Dodson and Velva Owens, loving grandfather of John Morgan, Nicole Gotti, Kristin and Justin Dodson, dear great-grandfather of Connor, Bryn and Madison. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home of Bel Air Inc., 610 W. Mac Phail Road (at Route 24) on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P. M where funeral services will be held on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment Bel Air Memorial Gardens.
EXPLORE
By C. Philip Nichols Jr | February 7, 2013
I read with great interest your article Jan. 31 about Laurel's first bank robbery by John Morgan. Sadly, this was not our last bank robbery and just as sadly, not the last 19-year-old to go to prison from our county. A quick review by the state archivist, Dr. Edwin Papenfuse, brings us the "rest of the story. " (By the way, if every part of government was as efficient or accommodating as the state archives, there would not be much to complain about.) The Hon. Chief Judge John P. Briscoe of our Circuit Court sentenced Morgan to five years in the state penitentiary, notwithstanding the recommendation for leniency by the bank president, Charles H. Stanley Sr. Several months later, Morgan's sister Gertrude, who was a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital, applied to the governor to pardon her brother.
FEATURES
By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 25, 1992
Can TV be too good for its own good? If most of prime-time TV -- laugh tracks, moving moments, lessons learned -- is life made simple, then NBC's "I'll Fly Away" is TV made difficult. Is it too difficult? Or have we all watched so much "good TV" that we can't recognize something great when it comes along?"Away," which returns Friday (9 p.m. on Channel 2) for nine weeks of new episodes, is not always easy to take. It offers few answers. It creeps along toward uncertain conclusions, its 1950s Southern setting unenhanced by stock characters or fake antebellum atmosphere.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | November 23, 1992
Freshman state Del. John Morgan thinks of himself as a citizen politician for whom government is more of a calling than a career."I think we were better off when the legislature was filled with farmers," the Howard County representative says.In some ways, Mr. Morgan is a throwback to that time. But in others, he seems light years ahead of it.At the age of 28, he has a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. He is also the second youngest delegate in Maryland, behind 23-year-old Kenneth D. Schisler, a Talbot Republican.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Criag Nova and Criag Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
The purpose of manners, or so I have always believed, is to make sure that no one is ever embarrassed. The best example I know of this is the apocryphal story of Queen Victoria who, when seeing one of her guests (a miner's wife, as I recall) drinking from a finger bowl, immediately did the same. And, of course, the use of manners cuts both ways. Not only does it protect those to whom we extend them, but it keeps us from making fools of ourselves, too, by saying or doing the wrong thing.
NEWS
October 17, 2004
On October 14, 2004, ROY CLAYTON beloved husband of Blanch I. (nee Mills), devoted father of Dolores Morgan and her husband the late John H. Morgan and R. Kenneth Dodson and his wife Dawn C., dear brother of Santa Dodson and Velva Owens, loving grandfather of John Morgan, Nicole Gotti, Kristin and Justin Dodson, dear great-grandfather of Connor, Bryn and Madison. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home of Bel Air Inc., 610 W. Mac Phail Road (at Route 24) on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P. M where funeral services will be held on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment Bel Air Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
December 27, 2003
John Marshall Morgan, a Severna Park insurance broker and avid golfer, died of an aneurysm Thursday at his Gibson Island home. He was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park and Glyndon, he attended the Calvert School and was a 1944 Gilman School graduate. After his World War II service in the Navy, he earned an engineering degree from the Johns Hopkins University. He was a member of the Delta Phi fraternity. He owned and operated the John M. Morgan insurance agency on Riggs Avenue in Severna Park for nearly 50 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Criag Nova and Criag Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
The purpose of manners, or so I have always believed, is to make sure that no one is ever embarrassed. The best example I know of this is the apocryphal story of Queen Victoria who, when seeing one of her guests (a miner's wife, as I recall) drinking from a finger bowl, immediately did the same. And, of course, the use of manners cuts both ways. Not only does it protect those to whom we extend them, but it keeps us from making fools of ourselves, too, by saying or doing the wrong thing.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
REPUBLICAN DEL. John S. Morgan of Laurel has made it official: He will battle veteran Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer next year for Maryland's Fifth Congressional District seat. Mr. Hoyer, first elected to the office in 1981, overcame strong Republican challenges in 1990 and 1992. However, the conservative lay of the land in the newly redrawn Fifth District, the ascendancy of the right in American politics and Mr. Morgan's considerable assets probably mean Mr. Hoyer is in for his toughest fight yet.In the 1980s, when it mostly comprised Prince George's County, the Fifth was reliably Democratic.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
John A. Giannetti, Democratic challenger in the District 13B state House of Delegates race, says incumbent John S. Morgan is working both sides of the issues -- criticizing business and development interests while taking money from their political action committees.Mr. Morgan, who has argued forcefully against unchecked development and has called for "tighter limits on PAC donations," received $2,738 from political action committees from Aug. 29 to Oct. 23, the most recent campaign finance reporting period.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
On a routine Friday night, John Morgan nursed a quart of cheap Popov vodka and cooked himself pork chops for dinner.He was living alone in a 16-foot-long camper trailer on Estelle Monks' rural spread in Cockeysville. It was a bitterly cold night. A space heater -- as well as the stove -- was plugged into an extension cord that ran from the trailer to a nearby shed.On Saturday morning, Feb. 12, firefighters found the body of John Patrick Morgan, 37, on his back near the trailer's front door.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 20, 1994
See, the '60s weren't so bad; they helped produce Picabo Street.CBS' breezy personality piece -- which included her parents' hippie roots -- and Street's own free-spirited nature on camera during competition were a highlight of last night's prime-time Olympic show.Hey, CBS, give her a sitcom instead of Tom Arnold. Here's a theme song: "Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Picabo Street . . ."Sleep on itBjorn Dahlie, Norway's cross country skiing hero in Lillehammer, has insomnia. Has he tried watching Pat O'Brien on CBS' late-night show?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 7, 1991
NBC has saved its best new drama for last. "I'll Fly Away," which premieres at 9 tonight on WMAR-TV (Channel 2), is so thick with fine writing, acting, mood and texture that at times it feels more like a feature film or a novel than a television show.That doesn't mean, though, that "I'll Fly Away" is flat-out terrific. Feeling like a novel or a feature film can be both blessing and curse for a weekly show trying to make it with TV viewers. And the curse could be enough to keep this drama from finding and holding an audience.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 20, 1994
See, the '60s weren't so bad; they helped produce Picabo Street.CBS' breezy personality piece -- which included her parents' hippie roots -- and Street's own free-spirited nature on camera during competition were a highlight of last night's prime-time Olympic show.Hey, CBS, give her a sitcom instead of Tom Arnold. Here's a theme song: "Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Picabo Street . . ."Sleep on itBjorn Dahlie, Norway's cross country skiing hero in Lillehammer, has insomnia. Has he tried watching Pat O'Brien on CBS' late-night show?
NEWS
December 22, 1992
Dr. John F. Richardson III, who taught at Morgan State University for more than 30 years and was chairman of the psychology department at his retirement in 1986. died Friday of heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Dr. Richardson, who was 74 and lived in Original Northwood, was described by family and friends as a "people person" who enjoyed interacting with his students.In his classes, he often demonstrated the power of hypnosis but always warned his students that it was a tool to be used only by experts.
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