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NEWS
September 29, 2004
On Monday, September 27, 2004, JOHN M., beloved son of the late John and Grace Schneider, loving brother and brother-in-law of James W. and Martease I. Schneider, beloved uncle of James W. Schneider Jr. and Carolyn A. Neville, three great-nephews and one great-niece. There will be no public visitation and Interment will be private. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his memory to the Christ Memorial Presbyterian Church, Elevator Fund, 6410 Amherst Avenue, Columbia, MD 21046 or to the Fairhaven Residents Association, 7200 Third Avenue, Sykesville, MD 21784.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
We've been hearing a lot about marriage lately from celibate clergy and other experts, so I thought that a layman's prspective might be of interest. Much of the talk keeps returning to procreation as the fundamental component of marriage, presumably because of the "be fruitful and multiply" injunction in the Creation story, though neither the church nor the state objects to the marriage of people who are past childbearing age, or unable to bear children, or uninterested in bearing children.
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NEWS
April 5, 1997
John Milton Bond, whose career with Household Finance Corp. spanned more than four decades before he retired in 1982 as a vice president and division general manager, died Wednesdayof heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 78.He joined Household Finance in 1941 as a branch representative in Lancaster, Pa., and rose to vice president in 1969. He served in the Army from 1941 to 1944.Born in Baltimore County, he was raised in Baltimore, graduated from City College in the 1930s and attended the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 2, 2010
John Milton McIntyre, a retired orthopedic surgeon whose operations allowed patients to regain the use of their hands, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his home in the northern section of Roland Park. He was 67. He was born in Cumberland and raised in Westernport, where his father was owner and general manager of the McIntyre Bakery. He spent his summers on Deep Creek Lake, where his family had a cottage. After graduating as valedictorian of Bruce High School in 1960, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
June 24, 2003
John Milton Morgan Jr., 81, service station owner John Milton Morgan Jr., a former service station owner who helped establish and served as president of the Maryland Independent Retail Service Stations Dealers' Association, died of bladder cancer Sunday at his home in Hanover, Pa. He was 81. Born and raised in Highlandtown, Mr. Morgan was a 1940 graduate of Patterson High School. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and was based in England with the 8th Air Force. He served as a bombardier and tail gunner aboard B-17 Flying Fortress bombers, completing 18 combat missions over Germany, France and Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
We've been hearing a lot about marriage lately from celibate clergy and other experts, so I thought that a layman's prspective might be of interest. Much of the talk keeps returning to procreation as the fundamental component of marriage, presumably because of the "be fruitful and multiply" injunction in the Creation story, though neither the church nor the state objects to the marriage of people who are past childbearing age, or unable to bear children, or uninterested in bearing children.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1995
Martin Scorsese's new and sensational "Casino" comes from a script written by the director and screenwriter-author-journalist Nicholas Pileggi, but it's hard to believe another name doesn't belong somewhere in the credits: John Milton.Yes, that John Milton, the original Uncle Miltie of English lit. For "Casino" is really "Paradise Lost" Vegas-style, a study of monumental and character-driven folly. Its majestic chronicle tracks two men who inherited the Garden of Eden and managed in a very short time to destroy everything for no more cogent reason than their own bitter and unmalleable pride, which goeth before the fall every darn time.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2004
Edward Weismiller is pretty surely the only living American poet to have run a counterspy operation in World War II Europe. "I ran the first captured agent," he says. "Once he was cleared for use [I] ran him back against the enemy." He served in France with the Office of Strategic Services, the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency. He's written a top secret history of double agents. And he was trained in the Ultra top secret decoding machine. "Therefore," he says. "I was not allowed to get anywhere near where I could be captured.
NEWS
September 20, 2003
But who is this, what thing of sea or land? Female of sex it seems ... - John Milton, Samson Agonistes ISABEL, IT SEEMS. She was a frisky girl, though the poet Milton wouldn't know, his verse referring to a more seductive, sinister creature. Our girl Isabel crept into town with less rain than we might have expected. Deceptively so, for though many of us in parts of Baltimore and Essex and Crisfield woke to water water everywhere, it was the wind by which we will remember her so. Shifting winds - they were Steve Marshall's concerns.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 17, 1997
News flash: New York lawyers, real estate developers and other top-feeders can be nasty characters. And they dress fabulously for funerals.This is just one of the many messages of "The Devil's Advocate," which folds Scripture, sex and soigne interior design into an overbaked morality tale for the 21st century. There might be other movies out there that started with a reasonably clever premise only to make a preposterous -- if good-looking -- hash of it, but "The Devil's Advocate" takes the prize for this season's most perverse outing by a franchise name.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 2, 2010
John Milton McIntyre, a retired orthopedic surgeon whose operations allowed patients to regain the use of their hands, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his home in the northern section of Roland Park. He was 67. He was born in Cumberland and raised in Westernport, where his father was owner and general manager of the McIntyre Bakery. He spent his summers on Deep Creek Lake, where his family had a cottage. After graduating as valedictorian of Bruce High School in 1960, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
October 14, 2004
On Monday, September 27, 2004, JOHN M., son of the late John and Grace Schneider, loving brother and brother-in-law of James W. and Martcase I. Schneider; uncle of James W. Schneider, Jr. and Carolyn A. Neville; three great nephews and one great niece. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, at Christ Memorial Presbyterian Church, Columbia, at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions may be made, in his memory, to the Christ Memorial Presbyterian Church, Elevator Fund, 6410 Amherst Avenue, Columbia, MD 21046 or to the Fairhaven Residents Association, 7200 Third Avenue, Sykesville, MD 21784.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2004
Edward Weismiller is pretty surely the only living American poet to have run a counterspy operation in World War II Europe. "I ran the first captured agent," he says. "Once he was cleared for use [I] ran him back against the enemy." He served in France with the Office of Strategic Services, the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency. He's written a top secret history of double agents. And he was trained in the Ultra top secret decoding machine. "Therefore," he says. "I was not allowed to get anywhere near where I could be captured.
NEWS
September 20, 2003
But who is this, what thing of sea or land? Female of sex it seems ... - John Milton, Samson Agonistes ISABEL, IT SEEMS. She was a frisky girl, though the poet Milton wouldn't know, his verse referring to a more seductive, sinister creature. Our girl Isabel crept into town with less rain than we might have expected. Deceptively so, for though many of us in parts of Baltimore and Essex and Crisfield woke to water water everywhere, it was the wind by which we will remember her so. Shifting winds - they were Steve Marshall's concerns.
NEWS
June 24, 2003
John Milton Morgan Jr., 81, service station owner John Milton Morgan Jr., a former service station owner who helped establish and served as president of the Maryland Independent Retail Service Stations Dealers' Association, died of bladder cancer Sunday at his home in Hanover, Pa. He was 81. Born and raised in Highlandtown, Mr. Morgan was a 1940 graduate of Patterson High School. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and was based in England with the 8th Air Force. He served as a bombardier and tail gunner aboard B-17 Flying Fortress bombers, completing 18 combat missions over Germany, France and Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | December 25, 2001
The end of learning is to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, and to be like him. - John Milton Of Education (1641) A 19TH CENTURY American divine, E.H. Chapin, in a wonderful sermon, once defined fashion as "a science of appearances that inspires one to seem rather than to be." I thought of Chapin's definition when I was called in the early hours one morning to pay my last respects to a remarkable woman with whom I had taught for 20 years. This dying colleague, a nun and fine Milton scholar, in 60 years had been registrar, dean faculty leader, mentor, friend and institutional memory for students, administrators and professors alike.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | December 25, 2001
The end of learning is to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, and to be like him. - John Milton Of Education (1641) A 19TH CENTURY American divine, E.H. Chapin, in a wonderful sermon, once defined fashion as "a science of appearances that inspires one to seem rather than to be." I thought of Chapin's definition when I was called in the early hours one morning to pay my last respects to a remarkable woman with whom I had taught for 20 years. This dying colleague, a nun and fine Milton scholar, in 60 years had been registrar, dean faculty leader, mentor, friend and institutional memory for students, administrators and professors alike.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 17, 1997
News flash: New York lawyers, real estate developers and other top-feeders can be nasty characters. And they dress fabulously for funerals.This is just one of the many messages of "The Devil's Advocate," which folds Scripture, sex and soigne interior design into an overbaked morality tale for the 21st century. There might be other movies out there that started with a reasonably clever premise only to make a preposterous -- if good-looking -- hash of it, but "The Devil's Advocate" takes the prize for this season's most perverse outing by a franchise name.
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