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By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 16, 2010
Leonard Pitts' column appears regularly. His e-mail is lpitts@miamiherald.com. We are gathered here today to pay our final respects to John McCain's integrity. It died recently — turned a triple somersault, stiffened like an exclamation point, fell to the floor with its tongue hanging out — when the senator told Newsweek magazine, "I never considered myself a maverick." This, after the hard-fought presidential campaign of 2008 in which Mr. McCain, his advertising team, his surrogates and his running mate all but tattooed the "M" word on their foreheads.
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By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Adm. Charles R. Larson, the onetime commander-in-chief of military forces in the Pacific who became superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy to restore discipline and morale after his alma mater had been rocked by the largest cheating scandal in its history, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis. He was 77. Admiral Larson's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Cmdr. Wesley Huey, a faculty member at the academy. Commander Huey said the four-star admiral had been diagnosed with leukemia two years ago. "Admiral Larson's death is a great loss for the Navy family and the U.S. Naval Academy," said Vice Admiral Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr., who took over as the academy's superintendent Wednesday.
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NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2008
How workable are the presidential candidates' health reform plans? The strategies of Sen. John McCain, a Republican, and Sen. Barack Obama, a Democrat, are different in their approaches to solving problems and their potential effects on voters. To choose wisely, you have to do some homework. To help, here are summaries of their proposals, health care statistics, and online resources that provide more information and analyze how well those proposals might work. John McCain would ... * Eliminate current tax exclusion for employer-paid health insurance.
NEWS
By Sarah E. Croco and Scott Sigmund Gartner | July 1, 2014
How far can President Barack Obama involve the U.S. in Iraq without taking ownership of a war he opposed and supposedly ended? Iraq finds itself once again on the precipice of civil war, presenting Mr. Obama with a difficult choice: Is the U.S. back in or staying out? In recent weeks, he has appeared as though he is trying to walk a fine line between the two. He earlier announced he was sending 300 military advisers to Iraq (Secretary of State John Kerry has also visited Baghdad), but he cautioned that the U.S. would only take military action "if the situation on the ground requires it. " Since then, several hundred troops have been sent to Baghdad to help protect the American embassy there and help with security and logistics, according to the New York Times, bringing the number of U.S. troops deployed to Iraq to 750. The decision over what to do is especially tough for Mr. Obama, given his history on the war. Candidate Obama made political hay on his anti-Iraq position in the 2008 primaries against Hillary Clinton, who could not escape her earlier vote for the war despite her subsequent reversal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and By Mike Leary,Sun Staff | October 27, 2002
Worth the Fighting For: A Memoir, by John McCain with Mark Salter. Random House. 396 pages. $25.95. John McCain's life has already inspired two remarkable books -- The Nightingale's Song, by my Sun colleague Robert Timberg, and his own Faith of My Fathers, both animated principally by his military service, during which he exhibited more bravery and resilience than all but a few can imagine. After his A4-E Skyhawk crash landed in the middle of Hanoi on Oct. 26, 1967, he spent 5 1/2 years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, alternately taunting his captors and boosting the morale of his fellow prisoners with his irrepressible spirit.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | February 10, 2008
Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney's decision to suspend his campaign has left Howard County Republicans, like those across Maryland and the nation, with what may be a tough choice for some who don't consider Arizona Sen. John McCain conservative enough to lead their party in November. "I've said all along I'll support the party nominee -- obviously not with the same enthusiasm, but it will build. It's frustrating," said Louis M. Pope, Romney's Maryland campaign chairman and a former Howard County Republican party chairman who is now a Republican National Committeeman.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | February 15, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- He is the poster boy of Republican presidential candidates. He was the youngest American president, maybe the most inventive, surely the most vigorous. But he was a different kind of conservative, and a different kind of Republican, than the caricature John McCain is presenting. Theodore Roosevelt was an exceptional Republican president, but he was also an exception among Republican presidents. Like his GOP brethren, he looked askance at waste in government. Like his Republican successors, he believed business was the engine of the economy.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | February 26, 1991
PhoenixIF YOU CAN call a man who spent five and a half years in a prisoner-of-war camp lucky, then John McCain, Vietnam POW turned Arizona senator, is lucky. More than a year after he was identified as one of the infamous 'Keating Five" of the S&L scandal, another war has given him a golden opportunity to salvage his political career.Ever since the gulf war began in January, McCain, a former Navy pilot, has been as much in deJackGermond &JulesWitcovermand on the news-and-analysis circuit as a retired four-star general.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 1999
PRESCOTT, Ariz. -- In most campaigns, a presidential contender tours the nation, introducing himself to voters far from home. John McCain's candidacy has reversed that process.McCain's run for the White House is revealing to Arizonans another side of the man who's been representing them in Congress for 17 years: his tendency to fly off the handle."I was surprised. It wasn't something that anybody talked about," says Norb Wedepohl, clerk of Superior Court in Yavapai County.Interviews around the state this week indicated that McCain's hot temper was not common knowledge until news reports this fall publicized the issue.
NEWS
November 6, 2008
A post-election postscript offers a chance to pick up where we left off on critical players in this historic election: Mac is back: In defeat, Sen. John McCain was a politician of striking grace and generosity. His warm tribute to President-elect Barack Obama recalled the John McCain who achieved success on tough issues such as campaign finance reform with compromise, respect and reaching across the aisle. His leadership will be needed in the new Congress. The Buffett factor: Despite Senator Obama's intention to raise taxes on the wealthy, 52 percent of voters earning $200,000 or more supported him, according to exit polls.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
Thank you for highlighting the most important finding of the recent Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change report: "addressing climate change appears to be cheaper than doing nothing" ( "Climate change demands action," April 19). Just as the vast majority of scientists agree that climate change is happening, it is caused by humans, and we need to urgently act to avoid the worst effects, so too do the vast majority of economists concur that a revenue-neutral carbon tax is the best option for reducing our greenhouse gas emissions.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 13, 2013
There are so many things to admire about John McCain. His service during Vietnam, his courage as a prisoner of war, his maverick nature in the hidebound U.S. Senate and, currently, his role as the only grown-up in the Republican Party. But I don't think I will ever be able to forgive him for Sarah Palin. His decision to pluck her out of Alaskan obscurity and put her on the presidential ticket in 2008 unleashed a genie that yaks incessantly, makes no sense and refuses to get back in the bottle.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 19, 2013
In a now-rare exhibition of sensible compromise in the United States Senate, John McCain of Arizona has re-emerged as the unpredictable maverick who had seemingly vanished in his 2008 bid for the presidency. Mr. McCain is credited with persuading enough members of his party to agree to a deal that avoid a threatened "nuclear option" -- a change in Senate rules that would curb the minority's ability to obstruct executive branch nominations by filibuster. The deal broke an impasse between Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell over Mr. Reid's notion to bar filibusters on confirmation votes for certain nominees by letting a simple majority shut off debate.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 7, 2013
The hawks are squawking. Congressional conservatives and the right-wing media are blasting President Barack Obama for going soft on the Syrians. The president insists there is a "game-changing" red line the Syrian government will have crossed if it is found to have used chemical weapons against its people, but he has bent the red line so far, the hawks say, that not only the Syrians, but the Iranians and North Koreans will conclude Mr. Obama is a...
NEWS
April 25, 2013
All of us were gripped into the tragedy of the Boston Marathon massacre. Our hearts were broken at the loss of lives and how so many lives were changed in an instant. We all cheered at the death of Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the brilliant capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. And we all breathed a sigh of relief for Boston. Yet, we cannot respond as Sens. John McCain and Lindsey Graham would like us to ("A case for civilian court," April 23). We cannot twist the law to fit our anger and grief.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Immigration reform advocates are organizing thousands of Marylanders to attend a Capitol Hill rally on Wednesday to bring attention to negotiations in the Senate over immigration. The rally, conceived by CASA de Maryland's executive director, Gustavo Torres, is expected to draw tens of thousands of people from across the country - though organizers say most will arrive from Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. A bipartisan group of eight senators has been working behind the scenes for months to draft an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws, an effort that gained political momentum after Hispanic voters - a growing voting demographic - flocked to Democratic candidates in last year's election.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 1, 2008
YORK, Pa. - It was an entrance almost worthy of Madonna. As the lights went down inside the Toyota Arena late yesterday afternoon and spotlights swept the crowd of more than 5,000, the Straight Talk Express bus pulled directly into the hall. Out stepped the Republican nominee for vice president, Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, to rousing cheers.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 13, 2013
There are so many things to admire about John McCain. His service during Vietnam, his courage as a prisoner of war, his maverick nature in the hidebound U.S. Senate and, currently, his role as the only grown-up in the Republican Party. But I don't think I will ever be able to forgive him for Sarah Palin. His decision to pluck her out of Alaskan obscurity and put her on the presidential ticket in 2008 unleashed a genie that yaks incessantly, makes no sense and refuses to get back in the bottle.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 18, 2012
Whether Susan Rice jumped or was pushed from consideration to succeed retiring Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, her removal from the equation clears one bone of partisan contention from President Barack Obama's plate as he heads into his second term. The UN ambassador asserted that she withdrew her name to save her boss from "an enduring partisan battle" that would further distract him and the country from urgent national priorities, including job creation, deficit reduction, immigration reform and "protecting our national securitiy.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 3, 2012
There was a time when a president and the opposition party in Congress could agree on certain basics, such as the right of the chief executive to select members of his cabinet with no fuss or bother. The president's most important choice in this regard was of his secretary of state, the first among supposed equals in the cabinet and once at the top of the ladder in terms of presidential succession after the vice president. That pecking order was changed by statute to elevate the speaker of the House and then the Senate president pro tem on the list, on the premise that anyone ascending to the presidency under the Constitution ought to have first been an elected official.
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