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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 30, 1991
Nothing like being down and out in a five-star London hotel. The servants look at you so uncomprehendingly and with such hurt in their eyes when, for the 10th consecutive day, you claim you don't have any change to tip them. And dodging that manager! That can be quite an ordeal.This is how the other half swindles. Tina and Jake, beautiful and worthless, are used to traveling first class and have convinced themselves that they deserve it. The fact that they have no money seems like a nasty bit of luck.
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By Michael Sragow | October 30, 2009
Toy Story and Toy Story 2 **** ( 4 STARS) You shouldn't pass up a chance to see them in 3-D. "Toy Story" is a buddy movie, with cowboy raggedy-doll Woody and sleek Space Age action figure Buzz going through the roughhouse version of getting-to-know-you familiar from "48 Hrs." and "Lethal Weapon." "Toy Story 2" is warmer and harder to classify. It's an ensemble comedy about several unexpected matters, including Woody discovering his show-biz roots - and his "inner cowboy" - and Buzz soldiering on through a hall-of-mirrors-like experience similar to the one John Malkovich endures when he goes into his own brain in "Being John Malkovich."
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By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 5, 1999
There's no way to assess "Being John Malkovich," a metaphysical comedy that takes viewers to the edge of consciousness and back in one long, screwball thrill ride, without beginning at the beginning.Craig Schwartz (John Cusack) is a struggling puppeteer whose street-corner adaptations of Abelard and Heloise get him into fistfights while his arch nemesis makes a name for himself with readings of "The Belle of Amherst" by a 16-foot puppet of Emily Dickinson.Craig's frizzle-haired wife Lotte (Cameron Diaz)
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 30, 2007
HOLLYWOOD studios are said to be in a backslide, grappling with unhappy realities. Well, boy, oh boy, that's not the picture I got of Paramount Pictures when I lunched with Brad Grey who now runs things there. Brad and I go way back to his days as a Young Turk agent/manager with the (Bernie) Brillstein-Grey Agency. Now, he's a movie tycoon in the creative manner of a starmaker. (Well, maybe not exactly because times have changed so much!) But with Brad, the talent still comes first. He and I sat down for a catch-up at Michael's popular watering spot.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | October 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- Quick, name four movies John Malkovich has been in. Stumped? Now picture his receding hair and cold brown eyes. The light bulb goes on, but it flickers, right? That's because Malkovich occupies the purgatory of middle-celebrity. He treads in a murky realm that generates questions like, "Say, didn't you play so-and-so in that, you know, uh, movie?" He escapes the pages of People magazine yet has a public reputation for being aloof. John Malkovich is the union of anonymity and visibility.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 18, 1996
It's been said before (by me) and it will be said again (probably by me): In the cycle of the American film industry, two months plus a few days belong to the kids, the two months being December (from Thanksgiving, say, till Christmas) and June (from, say, May 15 through July 4). But those two months pay for the other 10 months, so perhaps we grown-ups should not begrudge them their fun.That also means that down-seasons, like early fall and late spring, belong to us, more or less, which is why in the next few weeks movies with John Malkovich, Robert Redford, Liam Neeson and Steve Martin dominate the film fare, rather than the 18-to-25-year-old mod squadders so beloved by our unruly children.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
No one in movie history has managed to segue from lightweight TV-series star to deep-dish actor more convincingly than Johnny Depp. In the 17 years since he made his leap from Fox-TV's 21 Jump Street, he's managed the transition in a manner worthy of the Guinness Book of World Records - or the Alec Guinness School of Screen Chameleons. In his major roles he's been a shape-changer, going from the conscience-ravaged FBI agent of Donnie Brasco to the conscience-free Hunter S. Thompson surrogate ("Raoul Duke")
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By Michael Sragow | October 30, 2009
Toy Story and Toy Story 2 **** ( 4 STARS) You shouldn't pass up a chance to see them in 3-D. "Toy Story" is a buddy movie, with cowboy raggedy-doll Woody and sleek Space Age action figure Buzz going through the roughhouse version of getting-to-know-you familiar from "48 Hrs." and "Lethal Weapon." "Toy Story 2" is warmer and harder to classify. It's an ensemble comedy about several unexpected matters, including Woody discovering his show-biz roots - and his "inner cowboy" - and Buzz soldiering on through a hall-of-mirrors-like experience similar to the one John Malkovich endures when he goes into his own brain in "Being John Malkovich."
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2002
PARK CITY, Utah - Parker Posey could call the Sundance Film Festival her turf. A few years back, the Baltimore native became known as "Queen of the Indies" for appearing in three movies here. She has acted in more than 30 mostly low-budget productions in the last seven years. Sitting in a cafe the other day on Main Street, she wasn't feeling nostalgic. She is tired of the indie tag yet continues to align herself with small films such as this year's Personal Velocity, Rebecca Miller's smart take on three women at a crossroads.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
''The Object of Beauty,'' currently showing at the Charles, was made for those who enjoy the kind of comedies Hollywood did in the late '30s and early '40s.Michael Lindsay-Hogg, son of actress Geraldine Fitzgerald, wrote and directed the film, one whose principal characters are an American con man and his companion, an American con woman.These two are up to their evening clothing in debt. They can't leave the London hotel they are staying in because they owe too much. Which, of course, doesn't stop them from spending more and more and putting it on the bill.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
No one in movie history has managed to segue from lightweight TV-series star to deep-dish actor more convincingly than Johnny Depp. In the 17 years since he made his leap from Fox-TV's 21 Jump Street, he's managed the transition in a manner worthy of the Guinness Book of World Records - or the Alec Guinness School of Screen Chameleons. In his major roles he's been a shape-changer, going from the conscience-ravaged FBI agent of Donnie Brasco to the conscience-free Hunter S. Thompson surrogate ("Raoul Duke")
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By ROB KASPER | March 26, 2005
LOADING furniture on a rental truck last Saturday, I got the feeling that I had done this before. I had, of course. Who hasn't suffered through a move? But this time there were significant differences in the experience. This time, I was not the one who was carrying lamps out of the homestead. This time it was our older son. He had landed his first job and was transferring worldly possessions from his boyhood home into his new apartment in downtown Chambersburg, Pa. Another difference was that this time I wasn't doing the heavy lifting.
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April 12, 2002
Rated R * * 1/2 Human Nature, a twisted comedy about an ape man, a woman with excessive body hair and a behavioral scientist trying to teach table manners to mice, is clearly a product of the same off-kilter sensibilities that produced Being John Malkovich (both films were written by Charlie Kaufman). It's also nowhere near as good. Kaufman's follow-up to his amazing debut (Malkovich was one of the best films of 1999) centers on a bizarre love triangle. Tim Robbins is Nathan Bronfman, a behaviorist whose sole aim is to prove that nothing is more important than civility and proper etiquette.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2002
PARK CITY, Utah - Parker Posey could call the Sundance Film Festival her turf. A few years back, the Baltimore native became known as "Queen of the Indies" for appearing in three movies here. She has acted in more than 30 mostly low-budget productions in the last seven years. Sitting in a cafe the other day on Main Street, she wasn't feeling nostalgic. She is tired of the indie tag yet continues to align herself with small films such as this year's Personal Velocity, Rebecca Miller's smart take on three women at a crossroads.
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By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | January 11, 2002
Given recent events, should we expect a kinder, cuddlier, less-well-attended Sundance Film Festival this year? To date, Sept. 11 has taken its toll on movie gatherings in Toronto, San Sebastian and Mill Valley. Last year's Sundance turnout topped 20,000. This year's event -- which got under way last night in Salt Lake City with the world premiere of The Laramie Project, with Steve Buscemi and Christina Ricci, is already a victim of Hollywood paranoia and belt-tightening. Organizers say there will be more security, and fewer studio reps trudging among the at-times makeshift venues, which include two hotel conference rooms and a library auditorium.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | March 26, 2000
In the course of what always seems like an endless Oscars ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has never seen fit to recognize or reward what most filmgoers remember from the preceding year: the Best Moment at the Movies. But this year, the Academy has at least nominated most of the films that provided those moments. Who can forget Kevin Spacey's first toke in "American Beauty"? Or the opening strains of "Chan-Chan" in "Buena Vista Social Club"? Or Matthew Broderick's sly updating of Ferris Bueller in "Election"?
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By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 5, 1993
OF MICE AND MEN(MGM/UA, rated PG-13 1992).There's nothing wrong with the notion of remaking a movie of a classic novel, especially when the most recent cinematic incarnation is 53 years old. But any such endeavor faces a number of challenges, especially when its predecessor was nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award.Any such remake needs to justify itself to audiences. After all, if your vacuum sweeper is in fine working order, why do you need a new one?Actor, director and co-producer Gary Sinise fails to make a sale with his new version of John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | March 26, 2000
In the course of what always seems like an endless Oscars ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has never seen fit to recognize or reward what most filmgoers remember from the preceding year: the Best Moment at the Movies. But this year, the Academy has at least nominated most of the films that provided those moments. Who can forget Kevin Spacey's first toke in "American Beauty"? Or the opening strains of "Chan-Chan" in "Buena Vista Social Club"? Or Matthew Broderick's sly updating of Ferris Bueller in "Election"?
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 3, 2000
Director Robert Falls' 50th anniversary production of the Arthur Miller masterpiece, "Death of a Salesman," was the big winner at last season's Tony Awards ceremony, taking top honors for best revival, best actor (Brian Dennehy) and best supporting actress (Elizabeth Franz). The awards were well-deserved. Falls' interpretation cut right to the emotional heart of Miller's depiction of the devastating decline of a middle-aged salesman deprived of the job by which he has defined his existence.
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By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 5, 1999
There's no way to assess "Being John Malkovich," a metaphysical comedy that takes viewers to the edge of consciousness and back in one long, screwball thrill ride, without beginning at the beginning.Craig Schwartz (John Cusack) is a struggling puppeteer whose street-corner adaptations of Abelard and Heloise get him into fistfights while his arch nemesis makes a name for himself with readings of "The Belle of Amherst" by a 16-foot puppet of Emily Dickinson.Craig's frizzle-haired wife Lotte (Cameron Diaz)
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