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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1990
LONDON -- The shape of post-Thatcher Britain began to emerge yesterday as the challengers to succeed to the premiership laid out their political wares.The most dramatic vision was presented by Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major, who promised this most stratified of societies a classless meritocracy by the end of the century.Mr. Major, a self-made man with a working-class background who dropped out of school at 16, said, "We will have to make changes so that across the whole country we have a genuinely classless society so that people, according to their ability or good fortune, can rise to whatever position."
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 1996
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major won't let the Northern Ireland peace effort die without a fight.Last night, he gave Sinn Fein, the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, another chance to rejoin a peace process battered by Friday's IRA bombing in east London that killed two and injured dozens."
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- When Prime Minister John Major warned of a "Nightmare on Kinnock Street" should the Labor Party be elected Thursday, he was following the successful strategy used by the Conservatives under Margaret Thatcher in 1987:Attack Neil Kinnock personally, scare everybody by describing the disarray of Britain under previous Labor governments and suggest that it could all come back, like Freddy Krueger.The strategy hasn't varied since the start of the campaign March 11, but there is something amiss.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1995
LONDON -- Reintroducing Prime Minister John Major, the craftiest gambler in town.Yesterday, the gray man of British politics won the bet of his career with a decisive re-election victory as leader of the ruling Conservative Party and thus of the government."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 23, 1993
Isn't it wonderful how weather forecasting has become so accurate?John Major is coming to see Bill. Guess which one is the Oxford man.
NEWS
November 29, 1990
England's great 19th century novelist Charles Dickens had a penchant for choosing names to suit the character of the individuals he created -- Mrs. Micawber is a good example -- and we suspect that if he were around today and could have chosen a name for the British prime minister to succeed Margaret Thatcher, that name might have been John Major.The military rank of major is a mid-level slot held by people usually in their mid-40s -- as John Major is. Only a few years ago Major was just a bright and promising young officer in the Conservative corps that the redoubtable Margaret Thatcher had assembled.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 15, 1991
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major, riding high in the polls, could call a snap postwar election, opposition politicians fear.The new prime minister lacks a popular mandate for his leadership, having replaced Margaret Thatcher after an internal Conservative Party revolt late last year.Members of the opposition say he could be tempted to go to the country as early as June, a full year ahead of the deadline for the next general election, assuming the allies are victorious in the Persian Gulf war.Mr.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1991
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major's 100th day in power yesterday was marked by a political watershed, with interest here shifting from war abroad to problems at home.In the House of Commons, the opposition Labor Party made clear exactly where it will focus its attack from now on: the recession.Why, asked deputy leader Roy Hattersley, were British manufacturing exports, investment, output, and employment all falling at the same time?The prime minister, he said, would not "be able to run away from these issues forever."
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | December 1, 1990
THE BRITISH have replaced a Reagan with a Bush. With startling speed, the 372 voters have called off the Thatcher revolution to consolidate its gains.Where Margaret Thatcher is passionate, John Major is calm; where she is determined, he seeks consensus; where she is doctrinaire, he is pragmatic. And where she is a caricature of herself, he is a bland if handsome chap whom people are not inclined to dislike.The Conservative Members of Parliament were not choosing their leader ideologically.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | July 4, 1995
LONDON -- For a pollster analyzing an electorate composed of savvy politicians who have been called such names as "duplicitous liars," Bob Worcester is pretty sure of himself.Here is his call about today's battle for the Conservative Party leadership between Prime Minister John Major and former Welsh Secretary John Redwood:"Major is a goner."Not so fast, says Oliver Heald, a supporter of the prime minister."John Major is going to win on the first ballot," Mr. Heald says. "But I can't tell you the vote numbers we have.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | July 4, 1995
LONDON -- For a pollster analyzing an electorate composed of savvy politicians who have been called such names as "duplicitous liars," Bob Worcester is pretty sure of himself.Here is his call about today's battle for the Conservative Party leadership between Prime Minister John Major and former Welsh Secretary John Redwood:"Major is a goner."Not so fast, says Oliver Heald, a supporter of the prime minister."John Major is going to win on the first ballot," Mr. Heald says. "But I can't tell you the vote numbers we have.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1995
LONDON -- Sometimes, it just comes down to personality.One man likes Elvis and college basketball. The other is an opera buff and cricket fan.Since President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister John Major differ on even such basics as music and sports, maybe it is all the harder for them to agree on the important things. So last month, there was the spectacle of the two leaders playing telephone tag for a week before they could agree to talk long-distance.No wonder the historic "special relationship" between the U.S. and Great Britain seems to be on the rocks.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 12, 1994
LONDON -- The lion-maned Michael Heseltine would look good in a toga. He has the lean and hungry look of an ambitious Roman senator. Some say he also has the political instincts of, say, a Brutus.His political role seems innocuous enough. Mr. Heseltine is president of Britain's Board of Trade and Industry, a government post which makes him roughly the equivalent of the secretary of commerce in the United States.He's a great advocate of British competitiveness abroad and privatization at home.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1994
LONDON -- The names echoed off the National Gallery and around Trafalgar Square as the Rev. Derek White read from a roster of 617 people who died homeless in London in the past year.About 200 demonstrators, many ragged and scruffy and unwashed street people, gathered yesterday at the base of the square's towering statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson to protest Prime Minister John Major's condemnation of beggars as "offensive" and "eyesores."Mr. Major, campaigning for the ruling Conservatives in European parliament elections June 9, made his remarks in a newspaper interview Friday, and repeated his criticism the next day, saying his view is "what I think millions of people in this country feel."
NEWS
February 11, 1994
Gerry AdamsOnce again The Sun's editors are off-base with their analysis of the troubles in the North of Ireland, as evidence by your editorial, "Clinton's Irish Gambit," Feb. 4.Mr. Clinton displayed great foresight in permitting Gerry Adams to visit this country and speak his piece.This country has for too long been in an effective state of censorship regarding the Six Counties due to the State Department's willingness to acquiesce to the fancies of the British government.Thanks to the president, Americans heard more from Mr. Adams in 48 hours than many people in Britain or Ireland have heard in 20 years.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 23, 1993
Isn't it wonderful how weather forecasting has become so accurate?John Major is coming to see Bill. Guess which one is the Oxford man.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1991
LONDON -- Britain's political class is alive with anticipation that the Conservative government is preparing to risk its control over the country in a November general election.A Gallup poll last Friday put the Tory government of John Major 4.5 percentage points ahead of the Labor party, 39.5 percent to 35 percent. In August it was virtually the other way round, with 41 percent of the electorate leaning toward Labor and only 36 percent toward the Conservatives.Britain's third major party, the Liberal Democrats, has also been gaining through the summer.
NEWS
April 6, 1992
The British electorate must decide on Thursday whether to throw the long-ruling Conservative rascals out and, if so, for what combination of other rascals. At least they will do it after a campaign of just under one month, which is long enough for any informed voter to make up his or her mind.The Conservative government has been in power since 1979. Under Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, it changed the bloated and inefficient welfare state of Britain into a lean and sometimes mean capitalist engine that pays its way. After she went too far and wore out her welcome, a desperate party replaced her with her protege, John Major, a more namby-pamby figure who has brought the party to the center and dropped its most controversial nostrums.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 5, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's Prime Minister John Major just barely saved his government last night, his political career and possibly the Maastricht Treaty of European Union.At least for the time being.In two successive ballots in the House of Commons -- the first of which he won by six votes, the second by three -- he opened the way for the final ratification process of the treaty in Britain.The first vote was on a resolution proposed by the Labor Party to delay consideration of the treaty until after the Dec. 11 European Community summit in Edinburgh, Scotland.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | October 10, 1992
LONDON -- John Major restated his case for Britain's participation in the European Community yesterday. It was, he said, "a cold, clear-eyed calculation of the British interest."The prime minister ended a weeklong Conservative Party conference with a buoyant speech urging party unity, an occasionally humorous address that tried to put an harmonious end to a week of bitter debate.The conference, which was concluded yesterday in Brighton, was to be a delayed celebration of the party's electoral victory in April, a salute to its leader, Mr. Major, and a festival of Tory ascendancy in British politics.
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