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John Mackey

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July 11, 2011
John Mackey was quite simply the greatest tight end in NFL history, and the Baltimore Colts were America's team before there was an America's Team. I hope Mackey and Johnny U. are having a great game of catch in Heaven. God bless him and his entire family. Don Doby
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
One year, that's all he spent in Baltimore. But looking back, Roy Jefferson wouldn't trade that time with the Colts for anything in his football career. A first-team All-Pro wide receiver in Pittsburgh, Jefferson went from the Steelers, who'd won one game in 1969, to the Colts, whom he helped win Super Bowl V. "In 12 years in the NFL, that season was my favorite," he said. "Going from last place to being world champs? My God, there's no comparison. " Jefferson earned that Super Bowl ring.
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By Matt Vensel | July 7, 2011
We have countless awesome sports photos in the archives here at The Baltimore Sun , and I have decided to share one with you each week in a regular feature called "Throwback Thursday. " With former Baltimore Colts tight end John Mackey passing away Wednesday, I decided to dig through the archives for pictures. Unfortunately, I don’t think electricity had been invented when Mackey played because I couldn’t find any action photos besides the one we are using on The Baltimore Sun online sports page.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
It was, Willie Richardson said, the perfect send-off. Against Pittsburgh in 1971, the Colts' veteran caught two touchdown passes within two minutes to break open a 34-21 victory at Memorial Stadium. They would be the final TDs in a nine-year career for Richardson, an All-Pro receiver. He'd been dealt to Pittsburgh in 1970 only to return, a year later, as a free agent - just in time to stomp the Steelers. Released at season's end, he retired, a happy man. "I never wanted to leave Baltimore in the first place," recalled Richardson, 73. "But to come back and have that kind of a game, in front of the Colts fans, was icing on the cake for me. " Nowadays, he is color commentator for football games at Jackson State, his alma mater.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 7, 2011
John Mackey changed the game of football on and off the field. The former Baltimore Colt brought grace to a position that had been known for its brutality, and he made the first real headway in the NFL players' fight to earn a more equal share of the pie. That battle continues as the NFL lockout drags on this summer. Mr. Mackey, one of the game's great tight ends, a Hall of Famer and one-time president of the NFL Players Association, died Wednesday of frontotemporal dementia, a disease he had battled for 10 years, at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Kevin Mackey surveyed the room filled with former Baltimore Colts who'd come to pay homage to his late father, John Mackey, and shook his head. "I'm blown away," he said. "The fact that all of these players would show up tells me that they had a lot of respect for my dad, both on and off the field. " John Mackey, the Colts great tight end and Pro Football Hall of Famer, died July 6 of frontotemporal dementia. He was 69. Thursday night, Mackey's family received friends and fans at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, where more than a dozen of his former teammates came to pay their respects to the man who transformed the game, both as an explosive receiver and as the strong-willed president of the National Football League Players Association.
SPORTS
By Dave Zirin | July 9, 2011
In death, legendary Baltimore Colts tight end John Mackey will undoubtedly be remembered for how he played the game. The 6-foot, 2-inch, 230-pounder who played from 1963 to 1972 set the standard for his position, combining speed and power like no tight end who had ever taken the field. As his former coach Don Shula told the Baltimore Sun, "Previous to John, tight ends were big strong guys like [Mike] Ditka and [Ron] Kramer who would block and catch short passes over the middle. Mackey gave us a tight end who weighed 230, ran a 4.6 and could catch the bomb.
NEWS
By Cy Smith | May 8, 2012
We may never know exactly why Junior Seau died, of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest, at his home in San Diego on May 2. Suicide is commonly the result of depression, and perhaps Mr. Seau had a mood disorder that had nothing to do with his 20-year football career in which he played hundreds of games, made thousands of tackles, and hit - was hit - many more times than that. On the other hand, a career like Mr. Seau's - a linebacker with a reputation as a hard hitter and a "warrior" on virtually every defensive play, using his body as a weapon, and "playing hurt" - almost certainly included dozens of concussions, whether or not they were reported to his team or to the league.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 28, 2011
Baltimore Colts Hall of Famers Art Donovan, Lenny Moore, Gino Marchetti, Raymond Berry, Weeb Ewbank, John Mackey and Jim Parker will be inducted into the Hall of Legends at the Sports Legends Museum on Dec. 6, the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation announced today. The group will join previous inductees Babe Ruth, Johnny Unitas, Art Modell, Jim McKay, Brooks Robinson and Gary Williams in the Hall of Legends, an area at Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards reserved for the elite of Maryland's sports culture.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | May 25, 2006
I'm working out at Triangle Fitness in Eldersburg, I glance at the front door and notice someone walking through who looks exactly like John Mackey, the Hall of Fame tight end. That's because it was John Mackey, the Hall of Fame tight end. Very little gets past me. Pete Wright of the Howard County police department, and another friend, accompanied Mackey to the gym so he could meet the owner Joe Eder, a die-hard Baltimore Colts fan, and sign a few...
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | July 18, 2012
I think we can all agree the NFL is one of the greatest money-making machines of all time. The 32 teams generated close to $9 billion in revenue last year. Forbes magazine puts the average team's worth at $1 billion. Commissioner Roger Goodell makes $20 million a year. New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees signed a five-year contract worth $100 million. Ray Rice just agreed to a five-year, $40 million deal with the Ravens. I could go on and on. But you get the point. If you're anywhere in the NFL's orbit, you're probably not standing in soup lines.
NEWS
By Cy Smith | May 8, 2012
We may never know exactly why Junior Seau died, of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest, at his home in San Diego on May 2. Suicide is commonly the result of depression, and perhaps Mr. Seau had a mood disorder that had nothing to do with his 20-year football career in which he played hundreds of games, made thousands of tackles, and hit - was hit - many more times than that. On the other hand, a career like Mr. Seau's - a linebacker with a reputation as a hard hitter and a "warrior" on virtually every defensive play, using his body as a weapon, and "playing hurt" - almost certainly included dozens of concussions, whether or not they were reported to his team or to the league.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
The Alzheimer's Association's annual Memory Ball has drawn nine highly competitive dance couples, four well-known judges, including Maryland's first lady, and nearly 700 guests. But the star of the evening will likely be the ball honoree, Sylvia Mackey, a woman who has worked tirelessly for the association and its families. Mackey lost her husband, John Mackey , a Baltimore Colts tight end and first president of the NFL players union, last summer. He waged a long battle with frontal temporal dementia, a debilitating illness with many of the same characteristics as Alzheimer's.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Sitting on stage alongside his aging teammates, having dinner during the Sports Legend Museum induction at Martin's West Tuesday night, 85-year-old Gino Marchetti will chew on this: "It's amazing to me that, after all these years, people are still thinking of us," Marchetti, the Baltimore Colts' Hall of Fame defensive end, said. "I always figured that I'd play football for a few years, go home to Antioch (Calif.) and work in the mill until I turned 65, then go fishing. But, God almighty, the people of Baltimore want to keep promoting us. "The fans were always great in this town.
NEWS
By Sylvia Mackey | November 13, 2011
Oh, what a night! Late December in 1963. What a very special time for me - I married the love of my life, John Mackey . My husband played for nine seasons with the Baltimore Colts. In the years following his retirement from the NFL, I noticed unusual changes in his behavior. My first reaction was to go through various stages of denial, because I didn't know what else to do. But finally I couldn't kid myself anymore. Many doctors' visits later, and nearly 30 years after John played his last NFL game, John was diagnosed with frontal temporal dementia, which meant that he had severe shrinkage of the left frontal lobe of his brain.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 28, 2011
Baltimore Colts Hall of Famers Art Donovan, Lenny Moore, Gino Marchetti, Raymond Berry, Weeb Ewbank, John Mackey and Jim Parker will be inducted into the Hall of Legends at the Sports Legends Museum on Dec. 6, the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation announced today. The group will join previous inductees Babe Ruth, Johnny Unitas, Art Modell, Jim McKay, Brooks Robinson and Gary Williams in the Hall of Legends, an area at Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards reserved for the elite of Maryland's sports culture.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | July 7, 2011
John Mackey's suffering is over, but even in death he keeps giving to the game he loved. Mackey, the Hall of Fame tight end who played nine seasons for the Baltimore Colts, died Wednesday of frontal temporal dementia But soon researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine will study his brain to see if there's a link between repeated concussions in football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the perfect storm of head injuries that leaves ex-players reeling from depression, dementia, suicidal thoughts and God knows what else.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 13, 2011
It took months of negotiations to bring NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and players union chief DeMaurice Smith to a point where they could find enough common ground to end the offseason lockout and finalize a 10-year collective bargaining agreement. It only took a couple of phone calls to bring them together in Baltimore on Saturday morning to eulogize Hall of Fame tight end John Mackey at a public memorial service at the Cathedral of Our Lady the Queen. Sylvia Mackey invited both of them to speak at the two-hour ceremony that celebrated the on-field and off-field accomplishments of her beloved husband, who passed away after a long battle with frontotemporal dementia on July 6. "No one made a bigger impact on the NFL than John Mackey ," said Goodell.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman | August 11, 2011
Two of the most influential men in the National Football League, commissioner Roger Goodell and players' association executive director DeMaurice Smith, are scheduled to speak at a memorial service Saturday for John Mackey, the former Baltimore Colt and Hall of Famer who passed away on July 6. The 90-minute service, at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St., begins at 10:30 a.m. and is open to the public. Mackey, 69, a rugged tight end and onetime head of the NFLPA, died of frontotemporal dementia following a 10-year struggle with the disease.
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