Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Lithgow
IN THE NEWS

John Lithgow

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 22, 1999
William Alfred, 76, a playwright and Harvard professor, died Thursday in his sleep in Cambridge, Mass. He was credited with influencing a number of Harvard students who went on to theatrical careers, including Stockard Channing, John Lithgow and Tommy Lee Jones.Abne Parker Wigglesworth,78, an artist whose paintings combined elements of American and French art traditions, died of cancer May 1 in her home in New York City.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge, country legend Kenny Rogers and rock group Train have been added to the talent lineup for Sept. 13's Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six Pavilion. Also just announced: singer Jordin Sparks will join John Lithgow to co-host the event. The Star-Spangled Spectacular concert -- a celebration of the bicentennial of our national anthem to be televised live as part of PBS' "Great Performances" series -- also features performances by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Broadway star Kristin Chenoweth, country group Little Big Town, a cappella group Pentatonix, Motown legend Smokey Robinson, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves-Montgomery and performers from the off-Broadway show "Stomp.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
In the mean, flashy revenge thriller "Richochet," which opened Friday at neighborhood theaters, Denzel Washington plays Nick Styles, a police officer who makes an arrest during an amusement-park shootout.This event is memorable because it leads to the incarceration of the crazed Earl Talbot Blake (John Lithgow), because it greatly advances Nick's career and because Nick contrives to do it while stripped down to his skivvies.The film, while supposedly concentrating on the war of nerves between Nick and Earl, also concocts as many excuses as possible for Mr. Washington to show off his fine physique.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 24, 2004
SUN SCORE : ** With gung-ho verbal flourishes and fierce or poignant scowls, Liam Neeson sanctifies the crusading American sex researcher Alfred C. Kinsey in Kinsey. This human lightning rod from Indiana University becomes nothing more than a genitalia-obsessed heir to the sentimentalized intellectual crusaders of Hollywood yore. Paul Muni's Louis Pasteur and Emile Zola - along with Russell Crowe's recent portrait of John Nash - can't rival the Kinsey of this movie in either beneficence or controversy.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1995
Opera is an acquired taste, they say, but represents a grand mix of music, theater and choreography. PBS tonight offers a grand opportunity to acquire an appreciation for the form.* "Backstage/Lincoln Center" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Channels 22, 67) -- Music is best heard when you know something about it. This pre-production special takes a look at Verdi's "La Traviata," composed in 1853. The opera's original working title was "Amore e morte," or "Love and Death," but official censors in Venice forced it to be changed to the final title, which means "A Fallen Woman."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1993
"Cliffhanger"Starring Sylvester Stallone, John Lithgow and Janine TurnerDirected by Renny HarlinReleased by Tri-StarRated R** 1/2I thought of the poor Scarecrow from "The Wizard of Oz" as I watched "Cliffhanger." If it only had a brain! Handsome, energetic, expensive, it is also nearly bereft of evidence of intelligent life anywhere. Did humans actually make this film?The movie is set in the Rockies, where Sylvester Stallone plays a familiar role from his exhaustive repertoire of one. It's the superstud macho bull goose big dog, only haunted by a tragedy in his past.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
Shrek is the fourth entry in this summer's Little Italy Open-Air Film Festival. Here are four reasons why it's especially pertinent to see it tonight: 1. Mike Myers as the title ogre conjures more comic dimensions with his voice and computer animation than he does as his new Austin Powers villain, Goldmember, with makeup and prosthetics. 2. The parody of Disneyland -- with the evil Farquaad (John Lithgow) creating a sanitized court free of warts, smells and wrinkles -- plays even sweeter now that DreamWorks won the first Academy Award for best animated feature.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Are aliens visiting Earth and having their way with us? Watch "Nova" and decide for yourself.* " 'The Wizard of Oz' on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Oksana Baiul as Dorothy and Viktor Petrenko as the Scarecrow highlight this frozen version of the classic children's book and beloved MGM film. With ice skating already showing up just about everywhere on television, can a 24-hour-a-day, all-skating cable channel be far behind? CBS.* "Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This analytic, but still creepy, look at people who insist they've been abducted and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by aliens should get you thinking.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 22, 1995
Viewers who think there is no quality drama on commercial television can do themselves a big favor tomorrow night. They can set their VCRs to record Hallmark Hall of Fame's "Redwood Curtain" at 9 p.m. on ABC -- WMAR (Channel 2).Then some day when they have two hours, they can sit down and watch this wise, touching, made-for-TV movie. Maybe then they'll come to understand how much intelligent television life there is beyond PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre" on Sunday nights.I predict a minimum five Emmy nominations come September for this film about an adopted Amerasian woman (Lea Salonga)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 24, 2004
SUN SCORE : ** With gung-ho verbal flourishes and fierce or poignant scowls, Liam Neeson sanctifies the crusading American sex researcher Alfred C. Kinsey in Kinsey. This human lightning rod from Indiana University becomes nothing more than a genitalia-obsessed heir to the sentimentalized intellectual crusaders of Hollywood yore. Paul Muni's Louis Pasteur and Emile Zola - along with Russell Crowe's recent portrait of John Nash - can't rival the Kinsey of this movie in either beneficence or controversy.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
Shrek is the fourth entry in this summer's Little Italy Open-Air Film Festival. Here are four reasons why it's especially pertinent to see it tonight: 1. Mike Myers as the title ogre conjures more comic dimensions with his voice and computer animation than he does as his new Austin Powers villain, Goldmember, with makeup and prosthetics. 2. The parody of Disneyland -- with the evil Farquaad (John Lithgow) creating a sanitized court free of warts, smells and wrinkles -- plays even sweeter now that DreamWorks won the first Academy Award for best animated feature.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
After six years playing an alien on TV, actor John Lithgow is turning his attention to an only slightly less bizarre life form: children. Today at the Meyerhoff, Lithgow, the Emmy-winning star of 3rd Rock From the Sun, will serve as performer, narrator and master of ceremonies for a children's concert based on his recently published children's book, The Remarkable Farkle McBride. He'll read from the book, sing silly songs, wear silly hats. "Basically, it's old baggy-pants vaudeville stuff," Lithgow explains, "but I mix that in with subliminal music education."
NEWS
May 22, 1999
William Alfred, 76, a playwright and Harvard professor, died Thursday in his sleep in Cambridge, Mass. He was credited with influencing a number of Harvard students who went on to theatrical careers, including Stockard Channing, John Lithgow and Tommy Lee Jones.Abne Parker Wigglesworth,78, an artist whose paintings combined elements of American and French art traditions, died of cancer May 1 in her home in New York City.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Are aliens visiting Earth and having their way with us? Watch "Nova" and decide for yourself.* " 'The Wizard of Oz' on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Oksana Baiul as Dorothy and Viktor Petrenko as the Scarecrow highlight this frozen version of the classic children's book and beloved MGM film. With ice skating already showing up just about everywhere on television, can a 24-hour-a-day, all-skating cable channel be far behind? CBS.* "Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This analytic, but still creepy, look at people who insist they've been abducted and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by aliens should get you thinking.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 22, 1995
Viewers who think there is no quality drama on commercial television can do themselves a big favor tomorrow night. They can set their VCRs to record Hallmark Hall of Fame's "Redwood Curtain" at 9 p.m. on ABC -- WMAR (Channel 2).Then some day when they have two hours, they can sit down and watch this wise, touching, made-for-TV movie. Maybe then they'll come to understand how much intelligent television life there is beyond PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre" on Sunday nights.I predict a minimum five Emmy nominations come September for this film about an adopted Amerasian woman (Lea Salonga)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1995
Opera is an acquired taste, they say, but represents a grand mix of music, theater and choreography. PBS tonight offers a grand opportunity to acquire an appreciation for the form.* "Backstage/Lincoln Center" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Channels 22, 67) -- Music is best heard when you know something about it. This pre-production special takes a look at Verdi's "La Traviata," composed in 1853. The opera's original working title was "Amore e morte," or "Love and Death," but official censors in Venice forced it to be changed to the final title, which means "A Fallen Woman."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge, country legend Kenny Rogers and rock group Train have been added to the talent lineup for Sept. 13's Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six Pavilion. Also just announced: singer Jordin Sparks will join John Lithgow to co-host the event. The Star-Spangled Spectacular concert -- a celebration of the bicentennial of our national anthem to be televised live as part of PBS' "Great Performances" series -- also features performances by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Broadway star Kristin Chenoweth, country group Little Big Town, a cappella group Pentatonix, Motown legend Smokey Robinson, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves-Montgomery and performers from the off-Broadway show "Stomp.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
After six years playing an alien on TV, actor John Lithgow is turning his attention to an only slightly less bizarre life form: children. Today at the Meyerhoff, Lithgow, the Emmy-winning star of 3rd Rock From the Sun, will serve as performer, narrator and master of ceremonies for a children's concert based on his recently published children's book, The Remarkable Farkle McBride. He'll read from the book, sing silly songs, wear silly hats. "Basically, it's old baggy-pants vaudeville stuff," Lithgow explains, "but I mix that in with subliminal music education."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1993
"Cliffhanger"Starring Sylvester Stallone, John Lithgow and Janine TurnerDirected by Renny HarlinReleased by Tri-StarRated R** 1/2I thought of the poor Scarecrow from "The Wizard of Oz" as I watched "Cliffhanger." If it only had a brain! Handsome, energetic, expensive, it is also nearly bereft of evidence of intelligent life anywhere. Did humans actually make this film?The movie is set in the Rockies, where Sylvester Stallone plays a familiar role from his exhaustive repertoire of one. It's the superstud macho bull goose big dog, only haunted by a tragedy in his past.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
In the mean, flashy revenge thriller "Richochet," which opened Friday at neighborhood theaters, Denzel Washington plays Nick Styles, a police officer who makes an arrest during an amusement-park shootout.This event is memorable because it leads to the incarceration of the crazed Earl Talbot Blake (John Lithgow), because it greatly advances Nick's career and because Nick contrives to do it while stripped down to his skivvies.The film, while supposedly concentrating on the war of nerves between Nick and Earl, also concocts as many excuses as possible for Mr. Washington to show off his fine physique.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.