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NEWS
September 8, 2003
On September 1, 2003, JOHN LEWIS, JR. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, on Tuesday 7 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the chapel, on Wednesday at 2 P.M. Funeral at 2:30 P.M.
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By Jack W. Germond, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
I remember feeling trepidation when Jules Witcover and I, partners in writing our political column, joined The Baltimore Sun after the collapse of the Washington Star left us on the beach in August of 1981. I was aware of The Sun 's reputation for quality, and I had read the paper often in the 20 years I had been covering Washington and national politics. I knew the work of its stars - notably Phil Potter, Pat Furgurson and later Paul West - because we often were covering the same story.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Lynn Anderson and Michael Ollove and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
ATLANTA - The dream of many of those who live in Bowen Homes is someday to get out of the notorious housing project. Jamal Lewis, on the other hand, never seemed able to stay away. Although Lewis grew up in a stable middle-class neighborhood about five miles from Bowen Homes, a series of squat, two-story, yellow structures built in 1961, his father, John, said yesterday that as a teen-ager, his son beat a constant path to the project. And there, his father said, Jamal formed relationships that might threaten the football superstar just when possibilities for him seemed limitless.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
Regarding the reprehensible racist comments spewed by Tea party members on Sunday, House Minority Leader John A. Boehner of Ohio said, "The comments were "reprehensible and should not have happened, but let's not let a few isolated incidents get in the way of the fact that millions of Americans are scared to death" ("'Tea party' activists plan to fight on," March 24). This excuse sounds eerily reminiscent of President Bush's dismissal of abuses at Abu Ghraib, abuses that were the direct result of interrogation policies that were instituted by the President.
NEWS
December 6, 2004
On December 4, 2004 ELEANOR LOUISE SHANAHAN, devoted sister of Joseph Vincent Shanahan and his wife Irma and the late Anna R. Lewis, loving aunt of Regina Bressler and her husband William, John Lewis and wife Susan, Michael Shanahan, Joseph Shanahan and his wife Michelle, special great aunt of Heather and Tracey Bressler, Thomas, Brian and David Lewis, Kevin Schwartz and Jerry Shanahan, dear cousin of Marie Medlock. Friends may call at the the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A)
NEWS
May 7, 2006
Suddenly On May 2, 2006, JOSEPH CLARK BRADY; died at Spartanburg Regional Hospital in Spartanburg, SC. He was the son of the late John W. and Catherine (nee Richter) Brady and predeceased brothers, John Lewis and Lou Brady. He is survived by his daughter, Katherine and son in-law Billy Hopkins Jr.; granddaughter Mary Ann and her husband Donnie Koehler. Also survived by two grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild; cousins, nieces, nephews, and many friends.
NEWS
October 18, 1994
E. John Lewis, 78, a founder of the Pacifica radio network, died of a heart attack Oct. 11 at his home in Plandome, N.Y. In 1949, he helped to create the Pacifica Foundation and its flagship station, KPFA in Berkeley, Calif., which were the brainchild of his friend, Lewis Hill. Pacifica is known for its liberal and pacifist bent.Kenneth Moses, 67, of Marysville, Wash., a Snoqualmie Indian and logger revered by Indians in western Washington as a traditional healer, died Oct. 7 in Hawaii of a heart attack.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
Regarding the reprehensible racist comments spewed by Tea party members on Sunday, House Minority Leader John A. Boehner of Ohio said, "The comments were "reprehensible and should not have happened, but let's not let a few isolated incidents get in the way of the fact that millions of Americans are scared to death" ("'Tea party' activists plan to fight on," March 24). This excuse sounds eerily reminiscent of President Bush's dismissal of abuses at Abu Ghraib, abuses that were the direct result of interrogation policies that were instituted by the President.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
WHO AMONG US did not feel a little shiver of mean delight last week at the news that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy had not once but five times been told he could not board a commercial plane? The image of a genuine Washington pooh-bah falling afoul of the government's inane security system was one to savor. But now that we've had the advantage of a period of sober reflection, we're inclined to ponder: Is this idiotic, or what? The government keeps lists of suspected terrorists who aren't allowed to fly, and leaves it up to the airlines to enforce it. It's not at all clear how easy it is to get on one of these lists, but it's all too obvious that it's virtually impossible to get off one. Apparently the people who run US Airways had a no-fly list that included a certain "Kennedy," so that meant that the senior senator from Massachusetts -- incidentally the most famous member of the world's greatest deliberative body -- was kept off the plane by the airline's by-the-book gate agents until superiors were called upon to waive him aboard.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | October 10, 1997
HOUSTON -- Their lapel pins proclaim "Mars or Bust," and the four volunteers take that so seriously they have sealed themselves off from the outside world for 90 days.Their home is a small, furnished test chamber at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.The volunteers gathered Sept. 19 to begin the fourth in a series of increasingly sophisticated tests of new recycling technologies that NASA is developing at the center for future human spaceflight."This is as close to space as you can get without being there," said NASA's Don Henninger, the agency's chief scientist for advanced life-support systems studies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 23, 2009
John V. Lewis Jr., the former longtime proprietor of a landmark general store in Cambridge that sold everything from steaks to screwdrivers, died May 15 at Dorchester General Hospital of complications from heart disease. The Cambridge resident was 80. Mr. Lewis, the son of grocers, was born in Cambridge and raised in the city's Neck District neighborhood. In 1946, his father established the Lewis Drive Inn, and a year later, the Lewis Store on Route 343. Mr. Lewis was a graduate of Cambridge High School and served in the Army as a military policeman from 1950 to 1953.
NEWS
May 7, 2006
Suddenly On May 2, 2006, JOSEPH CLARK BRADY; died at Spartanburg Regional Hospital in Spartanburg, SC. He was the son of the late John W. and Catherine (nee Richter) Brady and predeceased brothers, John Lewis and Lou Brady. He is survived by his daughter, Katherine and son in-law Billy Hopkins Jr.; granddaughter Mary Ann and her husband Donnie Koehler. Also survived by two grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild; cousins, nieces, nephews, and many friends.
NEWS
December 6, 2004
On December 4, 2004 ELEANOR LOUISE SHANAHAN, devoted sister of Joseph Vincent Shanahan and his wife Irma and the late Anna R. Lewis, loving aunt of Regina Bressler and her husband William, John Lewis and wife Susan, Michael Shanahan, Joseph Shanahan and his wife Michelle, special great aunt of Heather and Tracey Bressler, Thomas, Brian and David Lewis, Kevin Schwartz and Jerry Shanahan, dear cousin of Marie Medlock. Friends may call at the the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A)
NEWS
August 23, 2004
WHO AMONG US did not feel a little shiver of mean delight last week at the news that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy had not once but five times been told he could not board a commercial plane? The image of a genuine Washington pooh-bah falling afoul of the government's inane security system was one to savor. But now that we've had the advantage of a period of sober reflection, we're inclined to ponder: Is this idiotic, or what? The government keeps lists of suspected terrorists who aren't allowed to fly, and leaves it up to the airlines to enforce it. It's not at all clear how easy it is to get on one of these lists, but it's all too obvious that it's virtually impossible to get off one. Apparently the people who run US Airways had a no-fly list that included a certain "Kennedy," so that meant that the senior senator from Massachusetts -- incidentally the most famous member of the world's greatest deliberative body -- was kept off the plane by the airline's by-the-book gate agents until superiors were called upon to waive him aboard.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove, Ryan Davis and Stephanie Hanes and Michael Ollove, Ryan Davis and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
ATLANTA - The change in Jamal Lewis last season was subtle but unmistakable. An extra measure of resolve. A willingness to lead. Most of all, a hunger for recognition, not as one of the workmanlike but faceless NFL running backs who dependably gain chunks of yardage, but as one of the league's elite performers whose name was on everyone's lips. The result was a season for the ages - nearly a single-season rushing record and one glorious afternoon against Cleveland when Lewis ran for more yards than any other man in NFL history, accomplishing what he most desired to unleash on a football field.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Lynn Anderson and Michael Ollove and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
ATLANTA - The dream of many of those who live in Bowen Homes is someday to get out of the notorious housing project. Jamal Lewis, on the other hand, never seemed able to stay away. Although Lewis grew up in a stable middle-class neighborhood about five miles from Bowen Homes, a series of squat, two-story, yellow structures built in 1961, his father, John, said yesterday that as a teen-ager, his son beat a constant path to the project. And there, his father said, Jamal formed relationships that might threaten the football superstar just when possibilities for him seemed limitless.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 1999
"I remember how vivid the sounds were as the troopers rushed toward us -- the clunk of the troopers' heavy boots, the whoops of rebel yells from the white onlookers, the clip-clop of horses' hooves hitting the hard asphalt of the highway, the voice of a woman shouting, `Get 'em!' "-- Rep. John Lewis in his memoir, "Walking with the Wind," recalling the 1965 voters' rights march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- When Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat, walks across the Edmund Pettus Bridge today, he will have a congressional delegation at his side instead of a band of civil rights protesters.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley has hired as his new chief of staff a veteran of Capitol Hill who many predict will bring a wise, calming presence to the city's youthful and often impatient administration. Clarence T. Bishop, 53, who was chief of staff for former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell of Maryland and Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, will take the $140,000 job Monday held by Michael Enright, a childhood friend of the mayor. Enright, 39, will remain one of O'Malley's top administrators and closest advisers and is not taking a demotion, officials said.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2003
John Lewis Lee Jr., a retired Army colonel and Bronze Star-decorated veteran of three wars, died of heart failure Sept. 1 at Multi-Medical Center in Towson. The Roland Park resident was 78. He was born and raised in Baltimore, and as a child living on Division Street had a paper route that included as a customer Thurgood Marshall, an eventual Supreme Court justice. Colonel Lee graduated in 1943 from Carver Vocational-Technical High School, and enlisted that year in the Army Air Forces - a decision that would lead to more than 30 years of military service, including World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars.
NEWS
September 8, 2003
On September 1, 2003, JOHN LEWIS, JR. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, on Tuesday 7 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the chapel, on Wednesday at 2 P.M. Funeral at 2:30 P.M.
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