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By CHARLIE MCCOLLUM and CHARLIE MCCOLLUM,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | October 18, 2005
John Leguizamo hardly seems the type of actor to be scrubbing in as one of the doctors on ER, NBC's long-running medical drama. The 41-year-old native of Colombia is best known for his edgy one-man shows (Freak, Sexaholix), his work in independent films (from Spike Lee's Summer of Sam to the new Cronicas) and quirky parts in larger movies (Toulouse-Lautrec in Moulin Rouge!). Over the years, he has limited his television appearances to late-night talk shows and the occasional HBO movie.
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By McClatchy-Tribune | July 2, 2009
It takes a while for John Leguizamo to get into sloth. "I've got to walk around the house a lot the day before, working on the lisp so that it's not too much, that it's just right," he says, demonstrating. Sloths have lisps, or didn't you know? The ancient ground sloths did, as Leguizamo interprets Sid the Sloth in the Ice Age animated films. "Sid's a vulnerable character, with a higher-pitched voice than you'd think. So I have to tighten up, get the voice up there so that he doesn't sound like a sloth who's been out partying all night.
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July 28, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Crooked cops try to rub out any and all witnesses to corruption in Assault on Precinct 13 (8 p.m.-10 p.m., HBO), with John Leguizamo (above).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
Choke: A sex-addicted medical school dropout works as a historical re-enactor at a Colonial theme park by day and engages in fake choking scams at restaurants at night all while discovering the mysterious truth of his family. With Sam Rockwell and Anjelica Huston. Eagle Eye : Two Americans are unwittingly involved in an assassination plot by a mysterious woman. With Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan and Rosario Dawson. Girl Cut in Two: A TV weather girl is torn between an older, distinguished writer and a younger, less-stable man. With Ludivine Sagnier, Benoit Magimel and Francois Berleand.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
"Hangin' With the Homeboys" is a surprisingly genial film. It's all about race, but it is without rancor.2 "Hangin' With the Home Boys" opens here today."Hangin' With the Homeboys"** Four young men, living in the south Bronx, do the town on a Friday night.CAST: Doug. E. Doug, Mario Joyner, John Leguizamo, Nestor SerranoDIRECTOR: Joseph B. VasquezRATING: R (sex, nudity, language)( RUNNING TIME: 88 minutes
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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 31, 2006
The good news about Ice Age: The Meltdown is that the nut-nutty, saber-toothed squirrel of the first Ice Age - the best, funniest thing in the movie - is back for the sequel. He fights off Ice Age vultures and piranhas for his beloved acorn this time. He takes his lumps, Wile E. Coyote, fashion. He turns ninja, when need be. And his every wordless entrance and ignominious exit is a hoot. Ice Age: The Meltdown (20th Century Fox) Starring the voices of Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
"Hangin' with the Homeboys" is a scrapbook filled with postcards of modern urban life. It's superficial -- putting a pretty veneer on some ugly aspects of life in New York -- but it's attractive and its pages turn effortlessly.Director Joseph Vasquez's first feature-length movie follows four young men from the South Bronx on a boys' night out in August. This is a movie filled with symmetries (two of the four are Hispanic and two are black) and it strives for inclusiveness. Except that none of the group is a scary punk, they cover every stereotype associated with poor youth of their background:Johnny (John Leguizamo)
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By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 7, 1997
"The Pest" is a mess. What else would you call an attempt to fuse a left-of-center social satire with a "Dumb and Dumber" vulgarian slapstick mentality?The frenzy runs deeper yet: That distant rumbling you hear is Joseph Connell, rotating in the grave over what has been done here to his famous story, "The Most Dangerous Game." Jeffrey Jones plays a laughably fanatical neo-Nazi hunter; John Leguizamo is the annoying human prey, nicknamed "Pest."The entire muddle is undermined by an awkward current of bourgeois intolerance, which dismisses Leguizamo's anti-social eccentricities as merely colorful (the character is a petty crook)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Spun wants to be The Lost Weekend of drug movies, but for movie-lovers it will merely mark a frittered-away afternoon or evening. It follows a speed freak named Ross (Jason Schwartzman) through three rancid Southern California days when he provides wheels for a methamphetamine chef known as, naturally, the Cook (Mickey Rourke) - a bad ol' boy who's the most potent figure in a grotty extended group of crank addicts. The gang includes the Cook's girlfriend, Nikki (Brittany Murphy), her gal pal Cookie (Mena Suvari)
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 24, 2005
We don't negotiate with terrorists!" These are the words of the villain Kaufman, played by Dennis Hopper, in George A. Romero's Land of the Dead. He's a capitalist-fascist who protects the richest of the rich in a high-rise city tower in a world gone to the zombies. And what do we make of such lines here in Movie Analogies 101, class? Knowing what we do about Romero's movies - that Night of the Living Dead was a Vietnam-America allegory, that Dawn of the Dead was a ghoulish satire of consumerism - well, we might just think Land of the Dead is about George W. Bush's Patriot Act America.
FEATURES
July 28, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Crooked cops try to rub out any and all witnesses to corruption in Assault on Precinct 13 (8 p.m.-10 p.m., HBO), with John Leguizamo (above).
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 31, 2006
The good news about Ice Age: The Meltdown is that the nut-nutty, saber-toothed squirrel of the first Ice Age - the best, funniest thing in the movie - is back for the sequel. He fights off Ice Age vultures and piranhas for his beloved acorn this time. He takes his lumps, Wile E. Coyote, fashion. He turns ninja, when need be. And his every wordless entrance and ignominious exit is a hoot. Ice Age: The Meltdown (20th Century Fox) Starring the voices of Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary.
FEATURES
By CHARLIE MCCOLLUM and CHARLIE MCCOLLUM,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | October 18, 2005
John Leguizamo hardly seems the type of actor to be scrubbing in as one of the doctors on ER, NBC's long-running medical drama. The 41-year-old native of Colombia is best known for his edgy one-man shows (Freak, Sexaholix), his work in independent films (from Spike Lee's Summer of Sam to the new Cronicas) and quirky parts in larger movies (Toulouse-Lautrec in Moulin Rouge!). Over the years, he has limited his television appearances to late-night talk shows and the occasional HBO movie.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 24, 2005
We don't negotiate with terrorists!" These are the words of the villain Kaufman, played by Dennis Hopper, in George A. Romero's Land of the Dead. He's a capitalist-fascist who protects the richest of the rich in a high-rise city tower in a world gone to the zombies. And what do we make of such lines here in Movie Analogies 101, class? Knowing what we do about Romero's movies - that Night of the Living Dead was a Vietnam-America allegory, that Dawn of the Dead was a ghoulish satire of consumerism - well, we might just think Land of the Dead is about George W. Bush's Patriot Act America.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Spun wants to be The Lost Weekend of drug movies, but for movie-lovers it will merely mark a frittered-away afternoon or evening. It follows a speed freak named Ross (Jason Schwartzman) through three rancid Southern California days when he provides wheels for a methamphetamine chef known as, naturally, the Cook (Mickey Rourke) - a bad ol' boy who's the most potent figure in a grotty extended group of crank addicts. The gang includes the Cook's girlfriend, Nikki (Brittany Murphy), her gal pal Cookie (Mena Suvari)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 13, 1999
David E. Kelley came into last night's 51st annual Emmy Awards with a record number of nominations for his shows and went home with the awards for the best drama and comedy on television.The producer's courtroom drama "The Practice" won as Outstanding Drama Series, while his offbeat legal series, "Ally McBeal," won as Outstanding Comedy."I think you can see from the look on our faces we're a little surprised, but we'll take it," Kelley said in receiving the awards, which came one after another at the very end of the telecast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
Choke: A sex-addicted medical school dropout works as a historical re-enactor at a Colonial theme park by day and engages in fake choking scams at restaurants at night all while discovering the mysterious truth of his family. With Sam Rockwell and Anjelica Huston. Eagle Eye : Two Americans are unwittingly involved in an assassination plot by a mysterious woman. With Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan and Rosario Dawson. Girl Cut in Two: A TV weather girl is torn between an older, distinguished writer and a younger, less-stable man. With Ludivine Sagnier, Benoit Magimel and Francois Berleand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 2, 2009
It takes a while for John Leguizamo to get into sloth. "I've got to walk around the house a lot the day before, working on the lisp so that it's not too much, that it's just right," he says, demonstrating. Sloths have lisps, or didn't you know? The ancient ground sloths did, as Leguizamo interprets Sid the Sloth in the Ice Age animated films. "Sid's a vulnerable character, with a higher-pitched voice than you'd think. So I have to tighten up, get the voice up there so that he doesn't sound like a sloth who's been out partying all night.
FEATURES
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 7, 1997
"The Pest" is a mess. What else would you call an attempt to fuse a left-of-center social satire with a "Dumb and Dumber" vulgarian slapstick mentality?The frenzy runs deeper yet: That distant rumbling you hear is Joseph Connell, rotating in the grave over what has been done here to his famous story, "The Most Dangerous Game." Jeffrey Jones plays a laughably fanatical neo-Nazi hunter; John Leguizamo is the annoying human prey, nicknamed "Pest."The entire muddle is undermined by an awkward current of bourgeois intolerance, which dismisses Leguizamo's anti-social eccentricities as merely colorful (the character is a petty crook)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lawrence Toppman and Lawrence Toppman,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 8, 1995
Three quarreling drag queens drive cross-country to perform, but their aged vehicle breaks down in a small town full of hostile inhabitants. There they find self-esteem, flirt with romance, and eventually win over narrow-minded townies.As Yogi Berra almost said, it's deja rouge all over again."To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar" was actually in early stages of preparation when "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert" burst out of Australia, later winning a 1994 Academy Award for costumes.
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