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By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 28, 2009
W hen Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the bestseller shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
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By Michael Sragow | November 20, 2009
Forget trying to compress an unconventional 339-page nonfiction best-seller into a two-hour movie without sacrificing its magic or integrity. Or convincing a superstar like Sandra Bullock that surmounting cliched visions of a Christian Southern belle was just the challenge that she needed. When writer-director John Lee Hancock set out to film Michael Lewis' "The Blind Side," the story of Baltimore Raven offensive lineman Michael Oher's rise from abject poverty and illiteracy to academic and athletic success, the filmmaker immediately saw what his toughest obstacle would be. "Casting someone to play Michael Oher!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
F orget trying to compress an unconventional 339-page nonfiction best-seller into a two-hour movie without sacrificing its magic or integrity. Or convincing a superstar like Sandra Bullock that surmounting cliched visions of a Christian Southern belle was just the challenge that she needed. When writer-director John Lee Hancock set out to film Michael Lewis' "The Blind Side," the story of Baltimore Raven offensive lineman Michael Oher's rise from abject poverty and illiteracy to academic and athletic success, the filmmaker immediately saw what his toughest obstacle would be. "Casting someone to play Michael Oher!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
F orget trying to compress an unconventional 339-page nonfiction best-seller into a two-hour movie without sacrificing its magic or integrity. Or convincing a superstar like Sandra Bullock that surmounting cliched visions of a Christian Southern belle was just the challenge that she needed. When writer-director John Lee Hancock set out to film Michael Lewis' "The Blind Side," the story of Baltimore Raven offensive lineman Michael Oher's rise from abject poverty and illiteracy to academic and athletic success, the filmmaker immediately saw what his toughest obstacle would be. "Casting someone to play Michael Oher!"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 20, 2009
Forget trying to compress an unconventional 339-page nonfiction best-seller into a two-hour movie without sacrificing its magic or integrity. Or convincing a superstar like Sandra Bullock that surmounting cliched visions of a Christian Southern belle was just the challenge that she needed. When writer-director John Lee Hancock set out to film Michael Lewis' "The Blind Side," the story of Baltimore Raven offensive lineman Michael Oher's rise from abject poverty and illiteracy to academic and athletic success, the filmmaker immediately saw what his toughest obstacle would be. "Casting someone to play Michael Oher!"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
When Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the nonfiction shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
A movie that cuts closer to the soul of U.S. politics than most of us would like to admit, Robert Rossen's 1949 All the King's Men (TCM at 4 p.m.) follows the tempestuous career of Louisiana Gov. Will Stark (Broderick Crawford), who exploits his populist roots into a career that makes him just short of royalty. As much Shakespearean tragedy as cautionary tale, the Best Picture Oscar winner features an extraordinary and Oscar-winning star turn from Crawford, whose limited acting range (he was great at bluster, but not all that much else)
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Any sports movie has a dual task: to simulate the game of choice (football, hockey, golf) and to unfurl its characters' journeys against that backdrop. Ex-ballplayer and first-time director Ron Shelton pulled it off in Bull Durham (1988), a film whose world was so steeped in authentic detail we could care about the characters. But hockey fans cringed at the sight of Rob Lowe's efforts to skate in Youngblood (1986), and seamheads winced at the double debacle of William Bendix (1948) and John Goodman (1992)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
"The Blind Side" has a supremely satisfying wrap-up: photos of football player Michael Oher with his adoptive family and the footage of his selection by the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL draft. There's nothing like that tingle of authenticity coming after a resonant fact-based story. Without restraint or subtlety, but with a lot of heart and energy, this movie tells a real-life tall tale - make that Big and Tall - en route to these closing attractions. Author Michael Lewis titled one chapter "Freak of Nurture" in his terrific nonfiction source book "The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
When Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the nonfiction shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 28, 2009
W hen Michael Oher takes the field as a Baltimore Raven this fall, a national audience of readers and moviegoers even bigger than the Ravens' fan base will be cheering for him. The amazing story behind his rise to football stardom will fill the bestseller shelves at bookstores on Oct. 12, with a new edition of Michael Lewis' powerhouse piece of nonfiction "The Blind Side." And if all goes according to plan, it will also pack movie theaters on Nov. 20, when writer-director John Lee Hancock's movie version hits theaters, starring newcomer Quinton Aron as Oher and Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw as Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy - the wealthy, white, conservative, evangelical couple who devoted themselves to the happiness and success of "Big Mike," a black kid from the meanest streets of Memphis, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | February 3, 2010
Charm City connections worked like shamrocks at the Oscar nominations this year. "The Blind Side," recounting the rise of Ravens offensive lineman Michael Oher from the Memphis slums, and "Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire," featuring Baltimore native Mo'Nique, won best-picture nominations. "The Blind Side" also earned a best-actress nomination for Sandra Bullock, as the wealthy Memphis mother who welcomes Oher into her family. "Precious" garnered five other nominations, including one for Mo'Nique's supporting performance as a monstrously abusive mother.
NEWS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Dan.connolly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Perhaps more than anyone, Jim Morris knows what Ravens offensive lineman Michael Oher will experience in the coming weeks. Like Oher and the soon-to-be-released movie, "The Blind Side," Morris' life story was made into a major motion picture in 2002. But Morris was retired from Major League Baseball for more than a year when "The Rookie," starring Dennis Quaid, was released. Not even "The Rookie" was a rookie when his life was immortalized on film - demonstrating Oher's unique situation.
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