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John Kennedy

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By John F. Kelly | February 1, 1993
JFK: RECKLESS YOUTH. By Nigel Hamilton. Random House. 898 pages. $30.NIGEL Hamilton strikes two major chords in "JFK: RecklesYouth," the first of three projected volumes on the life of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Once struck, they echo throughout this insightful biography that covers Kennedy's "rogue years," 1917 to 1946.It's obvious, first, that Mr. Hamilton, a British scholar whose literary reputation rests on a three-volume study of Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, has a great deal of admiration and affection for Jack Kennedy.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Dr. Robert E. Cooke, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician-in-chief who was a founder of the Head Start children's program and a presidential medical adviser, died of heart disease Feb. 2 at his Oak Bluffs home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. The former North Roland Park resident was 93. "We have lost a true visionary, whose acumen, passion and dedication have influenced generations of pediatricians and changed the lives of millions of children," said Dr. Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 19, 1999
NEW YORK -- John F. Kennedy Jr. is a New Yorker, and his fellow residents wanted him home. One way or the other.They began gathering Saturday night outside his home in the Lower Manhattan neighborhood of TriBeCa. Some stayed through the night. By noon yesterday, the crowd held steady at 60 or 70. They were of all ages, but mostly young, late 20s and early 30s, and mostly women.It was a United Nations of nationalities, but New Yorkers all. They came to this city, said many, for the anonymity and opportunity it affords its residents, even the famous.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | November 22, 2013
The walk home from school is what I remember most. It should have been a lighthearted schoolboy stroll for a sixth grader on a cloudy and mild Friday in late November, filled with visions of the weekend ahead and the long Thanksgiving holiday just a few days away. Instead, it was a mournful plodding along a route I had walked daily, yet, on that afternoon, my surroundings seemed somehow alien. The remnants of crisp fallen leaves crackling under foot served as constant reminders that, with each step, my childhood was palpably draining out of me and being left behind to evaporate into memory.
FEATURES
By Robert Erlandson and Robert Erlandson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1997
FRANKLIN CENTER, Pa. -- Alongside the dolls, model cars, commemorative ingots and other collectible bijoux, such as "Faberge eggs," that are its stock-in-trade, the Franklin Mint Museum will offer visitors a look at some actual historical objects over the next six weeks -- memorabilia from the lives of President John F. Kennedy and his family."
NEWS
March 2, 2003
On February 26, 2003 JANE E. KENNEDY of Glen Burnie beloved wife of John Kennedy; beloved mother of Jean and John Kennedy; loving sister of Jack Lawrence; loving grandmother of Heather and Christopher Kennedy. The family will receive visitors at the Singleton Funeral Home, P.A., 1 Second Avenue S.W. (at Crain Highway), Glen Burnie from 7 to 9 p.m. on Monday. The funeral ceremony will be held on Tuesday at 9 a.m. in the funeral home chapel. Interment in Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
On April 2, 2005 REV. JOHN KENNEDY. He is survived by seven daughters Isabella Davenport, Angela Johnson, Marilyn Hart, Adrian Dulin, Patricia Zellner, Carol Thompson, Natalie Kennedy, three sons John R. Kennedy, Anthony Kennedy, Paul Kennedy and a host of other loving relatives and friends. On Thursday, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (EAST), 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 3:00 to 8:00 p.m. On Friday, Rev. Kennedy will lie in state at 1st Baptist Church of Cherry Hill, 823 Cherry Hill Road, where the family will receive friends from 11:00 to 11:30 a.m. with services to follow.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | July 20, 1999
People magazine called him the sexiest man alive. Other, more florid, writers called him the crown prince of America's royal family. But it all came down to the same assumption: that every woman wanted to be the one to marry John F. Kennedy Jr.That we were swooning for a hunk with great pecs and bedroom eyes. Or we were daydreaming about being the lucky commoner he plucked from the crowd and elevated to enormous, casual wealth.As usual, those who claim to know the mind of the American woman had it all wrong.
NEWS
July 7, 2007
Peacefully on July 4, 2007, ARTHUR P. "OTTS" THOMAS, SR. beloved husband of Barbara J. Thomas; loving father of Arthur Thomas, Jr., John Thomas, Brenda Greenwalt and Beverly Pickett; dear step-father of Lynn and John Kennedy, Leane Youngmann and the late Kevin Kennedy; cherished "Pop-Pop" of Michael, Jason and Ashley Pickett, Brian, Shawn, Kevin, Crystal, Kelli and John, Jr. Thomas, Emma, Bryce and Grace Youngmann, and several great-grandchildren....
NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | November 22, 2013
There's not much left to be said about John Kennedy. I can't say I really knew him. But I did meet him a few times, and on the last occasion, he actually called me by name (good staff work, I'm sure). There weren't many Maryland politicians who backed his presidential candidacy in those early primaries. The dominant Tawes-Hocker machine opposed him. One of his most enthusiastic supporters was Jerry Hoffberger, who owned both the National Brewing Company and the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
At the federal courthouse, a judge was swearing in 102 new citizens. In a downtown hotel, the Santa Claus Anonymous charity was having a luncheon. Races were underway at Pimlico, and a shift of Bethlehem Steel workers would soon clock out at Sparrows Point, with another filing in to take its place. It was cool and cloudy in Baltimore on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963. Shortly after 1:30 p.m., by radio, television or frantic word of mouth, the news from Dallas made its way here: President John F. Kennedy had been shot.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 13, 2013
With Congress in the doldrums of summer recess, our town has inevitably sunk to the game of making political mountains out of molehills. The latest example is disclosure that the campaign manager of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell confided to a political associate, last January no less, that he was "sort of holding my nose for two years" working for Mr. McConnell. He was doing so, he explained, in hope of it being "a big benefit" for a previous employer, Sen. Rand Paul, also of Kentucky, who is said to have 2016 presidential aspirations.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
Helping companies save money on postage can bring in the big bucks. Baltimore-based Three Dog Logistics picks up mail from clients with high volumes, "commingles" it with other client mail going to the same ZIP code and delivers it closer to the end destination to qualify for a U.S. Postal Service discount. The company made the Inc. 5000 list of fast-growing private companies last year - again - because revenue grew nearly 150 percent from 2008 to 2011, to about $12 million. "We've been on the Inc. 5000 for three years in a row," said John Kennedy, the company's CEO. "And we actually might make the Inc. again this year.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Jules Witcover's commentary ("Don't count Biden out in 2016," Jan. 29) contrasts the vice president's potency with former vice presidents who had little influence or significance in American history. Indeed, when Lyndon Johnson was broached by John Kennedy in 1960 to be Kennedy's running mate, LBJ allegedly asked his mentor and fellow Texan, John Nance Garner, about the vice presidency. Garner, who was Roosevelt's veep between 1933 and 1941, allegedly replied, "Lyndon, the vice presidency isn't worth a bucket of spit!"
NEWS
December 20, 2012
Where does one start about guns and the love for an outdated Second Amendment that our forefathers if they lived today would never have written? Where does one begin about the armament industry, corporations without conscience for all they are killing in the name of profit? And what happened to the fingerprint activation device they once promised as a gun lock to save the lives of our children? What happened to our TV, theater, the games our children play, and who decided America needed a steady diet of murderous violence?
NEWS
By Todd Eberly | October 4, 2012
The first debate between President Barack Obama and former governor Mitt Romney is over, and there was a clear winner: Mitt Romney. Even President Obama's own team realized the obvious by suggesting veteran moderator Jim Lehrer did a poor job. (News flash — debate winners do not complain about the moderator.) Mr. Romney was clearly more engaged and engaging. He defended his policies and interacted with President Obama. President Obama's answers were often meandering and unfocused, and when Mr. Romney spoke, the president just looked down or seemingly ignored him. At one point, the president even asked the moderator if they could just move on to a new topic.
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