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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2004
John James Audubon, by Richard Rhodes. Alfred A. Knopf. 528 pages. $30. After reading Richard Rhodes' Audubon biography -- the third published this year -- I can't wait for the Broadway musical. Can a movie be far behind? It's a story with everything. Illegitimate teenage son of a French naval officer is sent to the United States to escape conscription into Napoleon's army and start a business career. Flops because he is more interested in wildlife and drawing. Goes to the edge of the wilderness at the beginning of the 19th century, where he makes a living doing portraits, and teaching art, music and French to patrons, while planning a revolutionary picture book on birds that eventually will be regarded as an unparalleled work, elevating the science of ornithology into art. Audubon's story includes sex, violence and comic relief: A mysterious woman has him do a nude portrait of her in New Orleans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2004
John James Audubon, by Richard Rhodes. Alfred A. Knopf. 528 pages. $30. After reading Richard Rhodes' Audubon biography -- the third published this year -- I can't wait for the Broadway musical. Can a movie be far behind? It's a story with everything. Illegitimate teenage son of a French naval officer is sent to the United States to escape conscription into Napoleon's army and start a business career. Flops because he is more interested in wildlife and drawing. Goes to the edge of the wilderness at the beginning of the 19th century, where he makes a living doing portraits, and teaching art, music and French to patrons, while planning a revolutionary picture book on birds that eventually will be regarded as an unparalleled work, elevating the science of ornithology into art. Audubon's story includes sex, violence and comic relief: A mysterious woman has him do a nude portrait of her in New Orleans.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
Near the door in the Annapolis library known as the place to go for volumes about Maryland law and government sits an unexpected collection of weighty bird books. With similar sets fetching millions of dollars, these might be the most valuable tomes in the Maryland State Law Library - a rare, original, four-volume double-elephant folio of John James Audubon's Birds of America subscription series prints, more than a century old. About 200 subscription sets of the prints - called double-elephant size because the sheets are about 39 1/2 inches by about 19 1/2 inches - were sold in the 19th century.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
Near the door in the Annapolis library known as the place to go for volumes about Maryland law and government sits an unexpected collection of weighty bird books. With similar sets fetching millions of dollars, these might be the most valuable tomes in the Maryland State Law Library - a rare, original, four-volume double-elephant folio of John James Audubon's Birds of America subscription series prints, more than a century old. About 200 subscription sets of the prints - called double-elephant size because the sheets are about 39 1/2 inches by about 19 1/2 inches - were sold in the 19th century.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 10, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- It used to be that the National Audubon Society was for the birds. That's not really true any more, and it's causing some serious problems, not least for the Society. It's also at the heart of a full-blown institutional identity crisis.Bird-watchers created the Society, and made it America's first great conservation organization. Writing in 1985 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John James Audubon, the Society's president, Russell Peterson, noted that "so many bird-watchers, from Teddy Roosevelt to Rachel Carson, have spearheaded the environmental movement."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | February 27, 2003
John James Audubon's birds will be nesting at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown Saturday through April 27. Or more specifically, reproductions of 50 of his most historically important ornithological paintings will be on view at the museum. The exhibit, Audubon's Fifty Best, features facsimile editions of his original works, using the highest resolution digital imaging technology available. Many prints are from Audubon's original engravings from The Birds of America volumes.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 7, 2012
Today's Google doodle honors Charles Dickens on his birthday. On the letters, you can see characters such as Tiny Tim of "A Christmas Carol" (one of my favorite works, in all forms, including the movie Scrooged and the Mr. Magoo cartoon). I always appreciate Google's playfulness; it's a great way to enliven a dull page. Google has been customizing its search site in earnest since 2000, and has produced more than 1,000 doodles. They vary by country, and you can browse the archive for various versions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2005
NOW OR NEVER In Hampden tomorrow, New York photographer John Glassie will present images of bicycles locked to poles in his East Village neighborhood. The photographs are from his book Bicycles Locked to Poles. His passion began with a Dali-esque bent bicycle wheel he passed every day for months. Glassie will also discuss other "inventory" artists, including John James Audubon, who painted birds, Bernd and Hill Becher, who shot water towers and Tudor houses, and Arnold Odermatt, a Swiss police officer who captured traffic accidents for 40 years.
NEWS
June 8, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Nelson J. Molter, retired head of the State Law Library and author of a history of Severna Park, will be offered at 9:30 a.m. today at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church, Ritchie Highway and Cypress Creek Road.Mr. Molter, who was 84 and had lived in Severna Park since 1911, died of heart failure Thursday at the Anne Arundel Medical Center.He retired in 1977 as director of what was then known as the Maryland State Library after 45 years of service.
NEWS
August 3, 1996
ANY GOOD field guide to the naturalists would distinguish Roger Tory Peterson as a breed apart. He taught generations of Americans what to look for and how to tell one bird from another. created a genre of field guides which, along with imitative competitors, are found throughout the world.Mr. Peterson's "Field Guide to the Birds" made him the most influential ornithologist since John James Audubon a century earlier. He was a bird-loving teacher and artist and everyone was poor in the Great Depression when he sent his book to publishers.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 10, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- It used to be that the National Audubon Society was for the birds. That's not really true any more, and it's causing some serious problems, not least for the Society. It's also at the heart of a full-blown institutional identity crisis.Bird-watchers created the Society, and made it America's first great conservation organization. Writing in 1985 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John James Audubon, the Society's president, Russell Peterson, noted that "so many bird-watchers, from Teddy Roosevelt to Rachel Carson, have spearheaded the environmental movement."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Peter Hermann | June 27, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, was sentenced seven years in federal prison Wednesday for stealing thousands of historic documents from archives and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 64-year-old was also ordered to pay roughly $46,000 in restitution. No sentencing date is yet set for his 25-year-old accomplice, Jason James Savedoff, who, like Landau, has pleaded guilty to theft of major artwork and conspiracy charges. More than 10,000 “objects of cultural heritage” worth more than $1 million - including letters signed by George Washington, John Hancock, John Adams, Karl Marx, Marie Antoinette and Napoleon Bonaparte - were recovered from Landau's Manhattan apartment, according to court records.
NEWS
By Frank Bruni and Frank Bruni,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 20, 1994
Over the past decades, short stories in general have grown almost maddeningly opaque and minimalist: Relax your eyes for a single phrase and you're likely to miss the meaning of a piece. John Hersey didn't succumb to this trend. If he had, he would never have produced a volume as lively, touching and compulsively readable as "Key West Tales."The best stories here -- and there are three or four gems -- are classically structured, with clear points of tension, a building sense of urgency and an outcome that answers just about all of a reader's questions.
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