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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
NOVEL UNTIL I FIND YOU By John Irving. Random House. 819 pages. Skeptical critics, ever-mindful of literary fashion, underrate him, but John Irving, a perennial best-selling novelist, has continued to rebel valiantly against the fictional demands of postmodernism. Until I Find You, his brilliant 11th novel, finds Irving once more in the realm of realism, and, with 819 pages, at a length rivaling that of Tom Jones and Moby Dick. Not for Irving are the pale, cardboard quasi-characters of the postmodern novel nor the death of the authorial persona.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
John Irving came to M&T Bank Stadium from his home in New Jersey Saturday to see his favorite soccer team, Tottenham Hotspur, play in person for the first time. But Irving, whose allegiance is derived from the fact his father grew up near the team's base in North London, felt as if he could have been in Liverpool. Red replaced purple as the favorite jersey color for the preseason friendly between the two English Premier League teams. Still, Irving and other Tottenham fans who came from all over the United States and Canada didn't seem to mind being in the minority.
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NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | October 3, 1994
A SON OF THE CIRCUS. By John Irving. Random House. 63 pages. $25.FARROKH Daruwalla is a perpetual foreigner. He feels at home in neither his native India nor his adopted Canada, and he identifies with neither his profession as an orthopedic surgeon nor his advocation, screen writing.Like the high-wire circus artists he so admires, Dr. Daruwalla's life is a continual balancing act between conflicting loyalties.In some ways Dr. Daruwalla resembles his creator, John Irving, in whose eighth novel "A Son of the Circus" he is the main character.
FEATURES
By TIM WARREN | June 4, 1994
Fiction: "Beach Music," by Pat Conroy; "What I Lived For," by Joyce Carol Oates; "Closing Time," by Joseph Heller; "None to Accompany Me," by Nadine Gordimer; "Tales of the Mayfair Witches," by Anne Rice; "The Informers," by Bret Easton Ellis; "Fatheralong," by John Edgar Wideman; "A Son of the Circus," by John Irving.Nonfiction: "Rainbow People of God," by Desmond Tutu; "The Ransom of the Russian Art," by John McPhee; "All the Trouble in the World," by P. J. O'Rourke; "Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years," by John Head; "The Delany Sisters' Recipes for Living," by Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany; "Baseball: An Illustrated History," by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
Simon Birch is a little guy dealing with big issues. Like, why did God put him on this Earth?Given that he was the smallest baby ever born at Gravestown Memorial Hospital, and that his survival constituted something of a miracle, this is no small issue for Simon. Surely, he reasons, God has a reason for creating someone so special. Surely, Simon is destined for some heroic purpose; if only he knew what it was.lTC Such is the central mystery behind "Simon Birch," an old-fashioned tearjerker in the best sense of the term -- a shamelessly manipulative heartstring-tugger that defies the viewer to maintain a dry eye. Few will rise to the challenge.
FEATURES
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,Los Angeles Times | September 28, 1994
No, there aren't any bears or wrestlers in John Irving's eighth novel, but even without those signature marks of his early work, his fans will feel at home here. His countryless characters don't, though. This book has orphans and doctors and writers, a whole circus full of animals, irony and sexual ambiguity galore. It has humor. It has violence. It has Mr. Irving's usual crowded, Dickensian universe and, if not World War II itself, the moral equivalent.For Mr. Irving is a moralist. This is clear now, though it wasn't always.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
John Irving came to M&T Bank Stadium from his home in New Jersey Saturday to see his favorite soccer team, Tottenham Hotspur, play in person for the first time. But Irving, whose allegiance is derived from the fact his father grew up near the team's base in North London, felt as if he could have been in Liverpool. Red replaced purple as the favorite jersey color for the preseason friendly between the two English Premier League teams. Still, Irving and other Tottenham fans who came from all over the United States and Canada didn't seem to mind being in the minority.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 19, 2000
Don't let national political tedium cloud your mind. Everybody loves a fight -- a good, nasty, freewheeling slugfest. So, when the Updike-Irving-Mailer vs. Wolfe brawl went very public, bookish fans from the bleachers to the skyboxes leapt up in standing waves, screaming for blood. "Book biggies break bones!" World Wrestling Federation thugs crumpled in limp-wristed shame. There's history behind it. But the spark that ignited this one was Tom Wolfe's novel "A Man in Full." John Updike's review in the New Yorker dismissed it as beneath even "literature in a modest aspirant form."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
NOVEL UNTIL I FIND YOU By John Irving. Random House. 819 pages. Skeptical critics, ever-mindful of literary fashion, underrate him, but John Irving, a perennial best-selling novelist, has continued to rebel valiantly against the fictional demands of postmodernism. Until I Find You, his brilliant 11th novel, finds Irving once more in the realm of realism, and, with 819 pages, at a length rivaling that of Tom Jones and Moby Dick. Not for Irving are the pale, cardboard quasi-characters of the postmodern novel nor the death of the authorial persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 8, 2001
In his new novel, John Irving seems to have attempted either (1) a fictionalized essay on the abject superficiality of television news, its perpetrators and its audiences; (2) a romantic redemption novel that suggests that decency and even maturity latently lurk deep in the otherwise tawdry spirits of arrested adolescents; or (3) a satire on contemporary novels that are fixated on the obsessively priapic nature of Modern American Man. After a very careful, patient reading, for the life of me I cannot divine which -- if any -- of these presumable intents was in Irving's mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 19, 2000
Don't let national political tedium cloud your mind. Everybody loves a fight -- a good, nasty, freewheeling slugfest. So, when the Updike-Irving-Mailer vs. Wolfe brawl went very public, bookish fans from the bleachers to the skyboxes leapt up in standing waves, screaming for blood. "Book biggies break bones!" World Wrestling Federation thugs crumpled in limp-wristed shame. There's history behind it. But the spark that ignited this one was Tom Wolfe's novel "A Man in Full." John Updike's review in the New Yorker dismissed it as beneath even "literature in a modest aspirant form."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
In Hollywood, aspiring screenwriters are taught to pitch their stories in short bursts of snappy prose. If you can't knock the moguls off their feet in 75 words or less, you might as well shred your script and get a real job. In recent years the book business has also fallen under the spell of the "high concept" story, and that's a real boon for authors who want to write screen treatments disguised as novels.At first glance, Sena Jeter Naslund's "Ahab's Wife, or the Star-Gazer" (Morrow, $28, 666 pages)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
Simon Birch is a little guy dealing with big issues. Like, why did God put him on this Earth?Given that he was the smallest baby ever born at Gravestown Memorial Hospital, and that his survival constituted something of a miracle, this is no small issue for Simon. Surely, he reasons, God has a reason for creating someone so special. Surely, Simon is destined for some heroic purpose; if only he knew what it was.lTC Such is the central mystery behind "Simon Birch," an old-fashioned tearjerker in the best sense of the term -- a shamelessly manipulative heartstring-tugger that defies the viewer to maintain a dry eye. Few will rise to the challenge.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 8, 1995
Boston. -- It is rush hour when I pull up to my mother's apartment. I am still speeding internally through the after-work time zone. The momentum of the day is pushing me forward long after its engine has turned off.Tonight however there is a job to be done, items on a list to be crossed off, a mission to be accomplished. My mother is moving, downsizing from one apartment to another, and we have all pledged to help.My assigned task is to begin to triage the stuff of her life. To pare down and sort out which items from the past will go with her to the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
In Hollywood, aspiring screenwriters are taught to pitch their stories in short bursts of snappy prose. If you can't knock the moguls off their feet in 75 words or less, you might as well shred your script and get a real job. In recent years the book business has also fallen under the spell of the "high concept" story, and that's a real boon for authors who want to write screen treatments disguised as novels.At first glance, Sena Jeter Naslund's "Ahab's Wife, or the Star-Gazer" (Morrow, $28, 666 pages)
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 8, 1995
Boston. -- It is rush hour when I pull up to my mother's apartment. I am still speeding internally through the after-work time zone. The momentum of the day is pushing me forward long after its engine has turned off.Tonight however there is a job to be done, items on a list to be crossed off, a mission to be accomplished. My mother is moving, downsizing from one apartment to another, and we have all pledged to help.My assigned task is to begin to triage the stuff of her life. To pare down and sort out which items from the past will go with her to the future.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | October 3, 1994
A SON OF THE CIRCUS. By John Irving. Random House. 63 pages. $25.FARROKH Daruwalla is a perpetual foreigner. He feels at home in neither his native India nor his adopted Canada, and he identifies with neither his profession as an orthopedic surgeon nor his advocation, screen writing.Like the high-wire circus artists he so admires, Dr. Daruwalla's life is a continual balancing act between conflicting loyalties.In some ways Dr. Daruwalla resembles his creator, John Irving, in whose eighth novel "A Son of the Circus" he is the main character.
FEATURES
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,Los Angeles Times | September 28, 1994
No, there aren't any bears or wrestlers in John Irving's eighth novel, but even without those signature marks of his early work, his fans will feel at home here. His countryless characters don't, though. This book has orphans and doctors and writers, a whole circus full of animals, irony and sexual ambiguity galore. It has humor. It has violence. It has Mr. Irving's usual crowded, Dickensian universe and, if not World War II itself, the moral equivalent.For Mr. Irving is a moralist. This is clear now, though it wasn't always.
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