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By DANIEL BERGER | April 27, 1996
I FIRST interviewed John Hume over a quarter-century ago, as he lay down for the night outside 10 Downing Street to protest British policy on Northern Ireland.He was a Northern Ireland legislator and civil-rights leader. His cause then was justice for the minority, not ending British rule. Yet his detractors assured me he was as Green underneath as Nationalist rivals he supplanted, which proved accurate.John Hume has long led the Social Democratic and Labor Party '' which wins the most votes from the Roman Catholic and Nationalist minority people of Northern Ireland.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 9, 2001
LONDON -- With its troubled past, complex issues and combative leaders, Northern Ireland often leaves outsiders perplexed. The British province once again faces a turning point as its leaders try to forestall the collapse of a local government and end a stalemate over disarming paramilitary forces, reforming the local police, and scaling back Britain's military presence. Part of the United Kingdom, Northern Ireland's six counties share a 303-mile border with the southern Irish republic.
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NEWS
September 29, 1997
GREAT HOPES attend the negotiations at Stormont, near Belfast, that aim to bring accommodation to the Protestant and Catholic communities in Northern Ireland, to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, and to that republic and Britain. A business committee gets down to setting an agenda -- in itself, substance -- today.Two developments, following the second IRA ceasefire, permit optimism. One is that John Hume, leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), biggest vote-winner among the Catholic minority in the province, is not running for president of the Irish Republic, for which he is eligible.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 1998
LONDON -- The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their efforts to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province.In honoring a peacemaker from each community, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.Hume, 61, the Catholic leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, has been at the forefront of Northern Ireland politics since the 1960s human rights movement.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 1998
LONDON -- The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize yesterday for their efforts to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province.In honoring a peacemaker from each community, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.Hume, 61, the Catholic leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, has been at the forefront of Northern Ireland politics since the 1960s human rights movement.
NEWS
November 29, 1995
EXPECT NO MIRACLES from President Clinton's trip to Northern Ireland on Thursday. High expectations based on his apparent successes elsewhere would lead to disappointment. What Winston Churchill in 1922 called "the integrity of their quarrel" is impervious to intervention by an outsider paying fitful attention.What Mr. Clinton carries in his pack is the importance placed on the American connection by the Irish Catholic side. Along with that is a suspicion by Ulster Protestants loyal to Britain that he wields a "green agenda" at their expense.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 9, 2001
LONDON -- With its troubled past, complex issues and combative leaders, Northern Ireland often leaves outsiders perplexed. The British province once again faces a turning point as its leaders try to forestall the collapse of a local government and end a stalemate over disarming paramilitary forces, reforming the local police, and scaling back Britain's military presence. Part of the United Kingdom, Northern Ireland's six counties share a 303-mile border with the southern Irish republic.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff | February 21, 1998
Dr. John Chandler Hume Sr., a former dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health and an authority on the treatment of venereal diseases, died Monday of pneumonia at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 86.Dr. Hume was an outspoken advocate for financing and public education programs to halt the spread of venereal diseases.Soft-spoken, witty and known for his puns, Dr. Hume earned a reputation for being in love with his work."His mother used to say, 'I wish we could have just one dinner-table conversation without the subject of syphilis coming up,' " said his daughter, Susan H. Artes of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 1, 1991
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Multiparty talks on the future of Northern Ireland opened here yesterday in an atmosphere of cautious optimism and under a veil of political secrecy.All participants have taken a virtual vow of silence for the duration of the talks, expected to be 10 weeks.No interim progress will be announced before final agreement is reached in the effort to end two decades of sectarian violence that has left 3,000 dead.The leaders of the mainly Roman Catholic Social Democratic and Labor Party were first yesterday to meet with Britain's Secretary for Northern Ireland Peter Brooke, who has spent the past 17 months putting the talks together.
NEWS
June 22, 1996
HIGH HOPES for the talks in Northern Ireland have capsized. IRA terrorism-bombing of a shopping mall in England , murder of a policeman in the Irish Republic - has destroyed the premise on which the polilitical alter ego, Sinn Fein, to double-talk. It embarrassed the Irish Republic government's faith in Sinn Fein's leader, Gerry Adams. And it provoked the two main Unionist parties in the Protestant community into competitive intransigence. Such may have been the intent.The unnecessary election that Britain held before the all-party talks impeded negotiations.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff | February 21, 1998
Dr. John Chandler Hume Sr., a former dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health and an authority on the treatment of venereal diseases, died Monday of pneumonia at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 86.Dr. Hume was an outspoken advocate for financing and public education programs to halt the spread of venereal diseases.Soft-spoken, witty and known for his puns, Dr. Hume earned a reputation for being in love with his work."His mother used to say, 'I wish we could have just one dinner-table conversation without the subject of syphilis coming up,' " said his daughter, Susan H. Artes of Baltimore.
NEWS
September 29, 1997
GREAT HOPES attend the negotiations at Stormont, near Belfast, that aim to bring accommodation to the Protestant and Catholic communities in Northern Ireland, to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, and to that republic and Britain. A business committee gets down to setting an agenda -- in itself, substance -- today.Two developments, following the second IRA ceasefire, permit optimism. One is that John Hume, leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), biggest vote-winner among the Catholic minority in the province, is not running for president of the Irish Republic, for which he is eligible.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | April 27, 1996
I FIRST interviewed John Hume over a quarter-century ago, as he lay down for the night outside 10 Downing Street to protest British policy on Northern Ireland.He was a Northern Ireland legislator and civil-rights leader. His cause then was justice for the minority, not ending British rule. Yet his detractors assured me he was as Green underneath as Nationalist rivals he supplanted, which proved accurate.John Hume has long led the Social Democratic and Labor Party '' which wins the most votes from the Roman Catholic and Nationalist minority people of Northern Ireland.
NEWS
November 29, 1995
EXPECT NO MIRACLES from President Clinton's trip to Northern Ireland on Thursday. High expectations based on his apparent successes elsewhere would lead to disappointment. What Winston Churchill in 1922 called "the integrity of their quarrel" is impervious to intervention by an outsider paying fitful attention.What Mr. Clinton carries in his pack is the importance placed on the American connection by the Irish Catholic side. Along with that is a suspicion by Ulster Protestants loyal to Britain that he wields a "green agenda" at their expense.
NEWS
November 12, 2001
THE GOOD NEWS from Northern Ireland is considerable and also, it is hoped, contagious. Executive government is back with David Trimble as first minister. He was approved by the majority of members of the assembly, by his Ulster Unionist Party and by the loyalist grass roots as polled. The new deputy first minister is Mark Durkan, new leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), which has been the main political voice of the Catholic minority for three decades. Mr. Durkan represents generational change from Seamus Mallon in government and from John Hume in leading the party that pioneered civil rights and constitutional nationalism.
NEWS
May 28, 1998
THE TWIN referendums in Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, with a combined favorable vote of 85 percent, promise a new beginning in Northern Ireland. Its place in the United Kingdom is conceded, both nationalisms are legitimized and new forms of cooperation will be established across the communal divide, across the Border and across the Irish Sea.The 71 percent majority in Northern Ireland for the Good Friday agreement was a closer thing than that figure suggests. With almost all Catholics in favor, the Protestant or unionist community voted about 55 to 45 in favor.
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