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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
After 41 consecutive appearances in the NCAA men's lacrosse tournament, No. 13 Johns Hopkins was left out of the 16-team field when it was announced Sunday night. The program's run had been the longest active streak in Division I in all sports - just ahead of Miami baseball (40 straight) and Virginia men's soccer (32). "We're very disappointed," Blue Jays coach Dave Pietramala said. "It was not how we set out to have this thing finish. I'm certainly disappointed for our team and our seniors.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Of the 12 Johns Hopkins players who have caught passes thus far, more than half of them are wide receivers. In fact, the top four in receptions and yards are wideouts. But in just four games, sophomores Quinn Donaldson and Bradley Munday have emerged as senior quarterback Braden Anderson's favorite targets. The 6-foot, 190-pound Donaldson leads the No. 10 Blue Jays (4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Centennial Conference) in catches (18), yards (301) and receiving touchdowns (three)
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins has dropped three of its past four contests and fallen to No. 15 in The Sun's rankings. But the Blue Jays team that has struggled to a 6-4 record is not the one that No. 4 Maryland (8-1) is anticipating for Saturday's showdown at Byrd Stadium in College Park. Coach John Tillman pointed out that John Hopkins sprinted to an 11-1 advantage en route to a 15-8 demolition of No. 16 Virginia on March 23 and owned a 10-9 lead with less than two minutes left in regulation before falling, 11-10, in overtime to No. 3 North Carolina.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
In Johns Hopkins' 33-14 rout of Moravian on Sept. 20, senior quarterback Braden Anderson posted career highs in passing yards (218) and completion percentage (73.5). It took Anderson only one week to surpass those totals, throwing for 359 yards and connecting on 76.3 percent of his passes in Saturday's 42-26 victory over Centennial Conference foe Muhlenberg. Add a career-best four touchdowns, and it's easy to see why Blue Jays coach Jim Margraff called Anderson's performance the best of his career.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 8, 2006
Baltimoreans refer all the time to the great university and hospital in their midst as "John Hopkins." Now someone an ocean away has taken up for those poor, misidentified institutions: Ian Mayes, the readers' editor for the Guardian newspaper in London "Johns Hopkins has in the past week achieved the dubious distinction of sharing with Lucian Freud the title of the most persistently and frequently misspelt name in the Guardian," Mayes wrote earlier this...
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
With Wednesday's naming of Douglas, Dunbar and Mervo as the public school entries for the President's Cup baseball tournament, the field is set for the event, which pits private and city school teams against each other the next two weekends. Longtime Mount St. Joseph's coach Dave Norton remembers the last time teams met in such a tournament and suggests no one should take the outcome of these games for granted. Norton can recall a tournament more than 20 years ago in which his team felt it had the upper hand because the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association teams had a greater pool of players to draw from.
NEWS
February 11, 2005
On Tuesday, February 8, 2005 ARLENE M. GHIO (nee Johnson); beloved wife of William "Bill" Ghio; devoted mother of Chris Barco, Brian Barco and wife Michele; dearest grandmother of Natalie and Juliana Barco; loving daughter of Marie Johnson. Friends may call Schimunek Funeral Home Inc., 610 W. Mac Phail Rd., (Rte. 24) on Friday from 4 to 8 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Margaret Church, Bel Air on Saturday at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers please make donations in Arlene's name to the John Hopkins University Pancreatic Cancer Research Program at John Hopkins Hospital, Department of Pathology, Room 2242, Weinberg Building, 401 N. Broadway St., Baltimore, MD 21231.
NEWS
July 7, 2004
On Friday, July 2, 2004, EDWARD A. HALLE; beloved husband of Ellen W. Halle (nee Weiler); loving father of Dr. Jan Halle, of Chapel Hill, NC, Edward A. Halle, Jr., of Upperco, MD, and James S. Halle, of Baltimore, MD, and the late Michael W. Halle; loving father-in-law of Cynthia Halle; beloved brother of the late David Halle and Peggy Halle; loving grandfather of Abbie, Tom and Sophie Suberman, and Ellen and Nicholas Halle. Services will be held on Sunday, July 4. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Cemetery, 2100 Belair Road, private at the convenience of the family.
NEWS
March 14, 2003
On March 12, 2003; DIANE (nee Wakefield); beloved wife of Barry J. Jozwick; devoted mother of Kimberly Terhune and Colleen Brandt; dear mother-in-law of Stephen Terhune and John Brandt; loving grandmother of Aaron, Katie, Andrea and Cameron Terhune, Megan and Morgan Brandt; loving daughter of Doris Wakefield and the late Norman Wakefield; dear sister of Linda Groth, April Rehbein and the late Gordon Wakefield. Also surviving are numerous friends, family and her beloved Rudy. Funeral Services will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Saturday at 10 AM. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
NEWS
September 2, 2005
On August 30, 2005 NORMAN C. GEORGE, beloved husband Lenore George (nee Bogner) and dear son of the late Charles H. George and Thelma Cappelletti and Stepson of the late Frank Cappelletti; also survived by several cousins. Mr. George was a barber in Towson for over 35 years and served in the Maryland National Guard reserves for 18 years. He was a big sports fan. Mr. George was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gerhig's Disease) in September 2003. He was admitted to John Hopkins at Bayview Care Center in July 2004 until his death.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
After sandwiching a closer-than-expected 27-20 decision over Centennial Conference rival Susquehanna on Sept. 13 with fairly dominant wins against Randolph-Macon and Moravian, Johns Hopkins encountered its first important test of the season Saturday with a road trip to Muhlenberg, which had captured seven league titles in the last 13 years. The Blue Jays left with more than a passing grade as they scored the game's first 21 points en route to a 42-26 victory. They improved to 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the conference and gave coach Jim Margraff a measure of comfort about his team's potential.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
In the past month, Johns Hopkins has routed Randolph-Macon (42-3 on Sept. 6) and Moravian (33-14 on Saturday). But the Blue Jays also had a 27-20 win over Centennial Conference opponent Susquehanna on Sept. 13 that was closer than expected. So which game is an accurate indicator of the Blue Jays' potential? Johns Hopkins coach Jim Margraff isn't sure. “I still think we're a work in progress,” he said Wednesday morning. “If we play a clean game with no turnovers and minimize big plays defensively, we can play with most people and certainly in our conference.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
In his first year as Johns Hopkins' starting quarterback, Braden Anderson might be expected to show some nerves and play with some hesitancy. But that hasn't been the case, according to coach Jim Margraff. “I think he's always been comfortable,” Margraff said of his senior signal caller. “I think Braden has a ton of confidence, and I think the guys have a ton of confidence in him. He's been at ease at the position, and he's been unflappable even when things aren't going well.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Johns Hopkins' football team is off to a 2-0 start for the fourth consecutive year, but this fall's beginning felt differently than in previous seasons. After an overpowering 42-3 victory over Randolph-Macon on Sept. 6, the Blue Jays merely outlasted Susquehanna, 27-20, in Saturday's Centennial Conference opener. Johns Hopkins needed an interception by senior safety Ryan Rice and a fumble caused by Rice that was recovered by junior cornerback Curtis Antrum to overcome four turnovers (two interceptions and two fumbles)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The past 10 months have been a long wait for Johns Hopkins , which lost 29-24 to Wesley in the first round of the NCAA Division III playoffs on Nov. 23. Brandon Cherry said every member of the Blue Jays has been chomping at the bit for the start of the upcoming 2014 season, which kicks off on Saturday at noon with a home game against Randolph Macon at Homewood Field. “Everybody's just excited to get back on the field,” the junior running back said. “It's been a while since our last loss to Wesley, and we're putting that behind us. We're coming in with the fresh mind that it's a new season and we're ready to get back in it.” The new season means a featured tailback role for the Parkville resident and Boys' Latin graduate.
NEWS
May 16, 2004
On May 14, 2004, DR. HARVEY MILES TOMPAKOV. He graduated from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, served his Internship at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, Greater Miami and his residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. He was a member of Maryland Medical Alumni Association, John Hopkins Medical and Surgical Socity and the John Hopkins Alumni Association. Dr. Tompakov was also a lifetime member of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Cogan-Tompakov of Ocala, FL; son, Brian R. Tompakov of West Palm Beach, FL; daughter, Amber L. Tompakov of Hypoluxo, FL; stepson, Mark D. Cogan of Ocala, FL; sister, Diane Salama of Baltimore; father, Samuel Tompakov of Baltimore.
NEWS
October 22, 1994
DR. JOEL FLEISCHMAN, Johns Hopkins will never take you now. On the CBS television show "Northern Exposure" last Monday, lead actor Rob Morrow, who plays the role of a young New York doctor transplanted to Alaska, repeatedly tTC mispronounced the name of the renowned Johns Hopkins Medical School as "John Hopkins."It's not an uncommon mistake. So prevalent is the error that the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University produced a brochure several years ago, entitled "All about Johns," to explain the origin of the name of the institution's founder.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Atwater's will open a restaurant at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, an 88-acre mixed-use science campus under development in Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood.  Atwater's will take over the space in the Rangos Building that had been Cuban Revolution, which closed late last year. Opened in February 2013, Cuban Revolution was the first new restaurant to open in the emerging district, which is being developed by the Forest City-New East Baltimore Partnership.   The new restaurant will have its formal opening in early October but will be open for business sometime in mid-September, according to a spokesman for the Forest City Enterprises, Inc. This will be the sixth location for Ned Atwater's Catonsville-based group of cafes and markets.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Newly suspicious of the pen hanging on a lanyard Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita A. Levy wore around his neck, a clinical technician who had worked with him for two years took it one day early last year. What she saw when she got home and plugged the device into her computer set off an investigation that shook thousands of women across the region and led the world-renowned hospital to pay $190 million to settle a class-action lawsuit. After she notified Hopkins officials, who viewed the files and confronted Levy, they did not contact city police for a few days.
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