Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Hirschbeck
IN THE NEWS

John Hirschbeck

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1996
The boy loves games of chance. He loves slot machines and playing cards and instant-win lottery tickets. He learned at an early age to count coins, and to bet them. He learned in the hospital that money comes in get-well cards.Michael Hirschbeck learned to play gin in the hospital, too. His father taught him, during the long weeks of waiting, between the chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant and seizures and pneumonia and days when he was too sick to even eat a cup of ice chips. He never asked a lot of questions, even the day his parents told him he had the same disease as his older brother, who was already dying, and that it would take his baby sister's bone marrow to save his life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | April 9, 2014
Michael Hirschbeck, the 27-year-old son of major league baseball umpire John Hirschbeck, died Tuesday, WFMJ in Youngstown, Ohio, reported. Michael Hirschbeck had adrenoleukodystrophy, an inherited condition that affects the nervous system. John Hirschbeck's oldest son, John, was 8 years old when he died in 1993 of the rare degenerative disease. The Poland, Ohio, family's struggle with ALD was told in a series of 1996 articles in The Sun that won a Pulitzer Prize. Lisa Pollak's story, "The Umpire's Sons," recounted a family tragedy that had become a footnote in the feverish media coverage after Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar spat on Hirschbeck after a controversial call in 1996.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | October 27, 1999
The start of the Sept. 5 game between the Orioles and Cleveland Indians was delayed 89 minutes by rain. Denise Hirschbeck and her three children rode down an elevator to the sub-concourse level at Camden Yards, in search of her husband, John, and a new family friend, Indians second baseman Roberto Alomar.John Hirschbeck was in the umpires' room, waiting out the delay. His wife and children were visiting from Poland, Ohio. He led them to a hallway outside the visitors' clubhouse, and asked an Indians player to summon Alomar.
SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 27, 1996: Robert Alomar infamously spit in the face of umpire John Hirschbeck.
SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 27, 1996: Robert Alomar infamously spit in the face of umpire John Hirschbeck.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
The Baltimore Sun's management and staff congratulate feature writer Lisa Pollak on winning the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing.While the nation focused on an ugly incident, Lisa saw a story no one else was telling: What was it like to be John Hirschbeck ` to survive the death of one son and to wake up every day knowing that another son suffered from the same disease.Lisa's story in The Sun went beyond the event being covered by every other newspaper in America. Only hers revealed the human drama behind the story.
SPORTS
By Bob Ryan and Bob Ryan,The Boston Globe | April 17, 1995
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Terry Kraft had just gotten through saying how it seems to be a baseball tradition to commence serious negotiations with major league umpires on or about Opening Day.Vic Voltaggio had just observed that perhaps it actually would be a good idea to start the season with scab umpires, so the powers-that-be could see for themselves the vast difference in quality between the replacements and the real thing.Just then a voice rang out:"Jose's just joined the picket line!"Kraft and Voltaggio turned, and there he was. Jose Canseco was standing in the middle of a crowd with an umpires' picket sign around his neck.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Buster Olney and Ken Rosenthal and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Roberto Alomar's marketing agent and Orioles owner Peter Angelos want John Hirschbeck to apologize for swearing at Alomar, saying the verbal attack prompted the second baseman to spit on the umpire last September in Toronto.But Hirschbeck said last night that he would not apologize, and maintained he was not to blame for the incident."Do I think I did anything wrong? In my opinion, I do not," Hirschbeck said from his home in Poland, Ohio. "Do I think I owe anyone an apology for anything I did?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 6, 2010
Former Oriole Roberto Alomar will find out today whether his stellar career as one of the best second basemen in the history of baseball will outweigh one ugly moment in 1996 that has scarred his reputation ever since. Alomar's name appeared on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this past November, and he is considered the strongest candidate to gain induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame when the results of the balloting are announced by the Hall and the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
SPORTS
October 1, 1996
Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar issued the following apology yesterday for his behavior Friday in Toronto, when he reacted to his ejection by spitting on umpire John Hirschbeck and by later saying the umpire's demeanor had changed since the death of his young son in 1993:"I wish to take this opportunity to apologize to John Hirschbeck and his family for any pain and embarrassment that my comments and actions may have caused them. I deeply regret my disrespectful conduct toward a man that I know always gives his utmost as an umpire.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Dan.connolly@baltsun.com | January 7, 2010
Roberto Alomar, the slick-fielding second baseman who spent three splendid but somewhat controversial seasons with the Orioles, fell eight votes short Wednesday in his bid to become a first-ballot inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Alomar was named on 397 of 539 ballots (73.7 percent) submitted by eligible members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America. To gain induction, he needed 75 percent, which this year was 405 votes. "I feel disappointed, but next year hopefully I make it in," Alomar said from his home in New York.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 6, 2010
Former Oriole Roberto Alomar will find out today whether his stellar career as one of the best second basemen in the history of baseball will outweigh one ugly moment in 1996 that has scarred his reputation ever since. Alomar's name appeared on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this past November, and he is considered the strongest candidate to gain induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame when the results of the balloting are announced by the Hall and the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
NEWS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | October 27, 1999
The start of the Sept. 5 game between the Orioles and Cleveland Indians was delayed 89 minutes by rain. Denise Hirschbeck and her three children rode down an elevator to the sub-concourse level at Camden Yards, in search of her husband, John, and a new family friend, Indians second baseman Roberto Alomar.John Hirschbeck was in the umpires' room, waiting out the delay. His wife and children were visiting from Poland, Ohio. He led them to a hallway outside the visitors' clubhouse, and asked an Indians player to summon Alomar.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
CLEVELAND -- The Orioles cried foul last night, and this time they meant it literally.The Cleveland Indians continued their miracle march toward the World Series when Marquis Grissom scored on a blown suicide squeeze play in the 12th inning to give them a 2-1 victory over the Orioles in Game 3 of the American League Championship Series at Jacobs Field.Indians shortstop Omar Vizquel failed to lay down the sacrifice bunt -- missed the pitch completely, according to umpire John Hirschbeck -- and the ball deflected off the glove of Orioles catcher Lenny Webster, allowing Grissom to sprint home from third and put the Indians up, two games to one, in the best-of-seven playoff.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
CHICAGO -- So what if the Orioles have scored five runs while stranding the entire South Side in three games. A slump is in the eye of the hitter, and Roberto Alomar sees no slumps.Doing his best to jack the Orioles from their most pronounced offensive funk of the season, Alomar made the most of yesterday's reunion with Chicago White Sox starter Danny Darwin. While Darwin's underpowered but well-placed assortment represents kryptonite to most of the Orioles' superbats, he is putty to Alomar.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
The Baltimore Sun's management and staff congratulate feature writer Lisa Pollak on winning the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing.While the nation focused on an ugly incident, Lisa saw a story no one else was telling: What was it like to be John Hirschbeck ` to survive the death of one son and to wake up every day knowing that another son suffered from the same disease.Lisa's story in The Sun went beyond the event being covered by every other newspaper in America. Only hers revealed the human drama behind the story.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
LAST FALL, an argument between Orioles second-baseman Roberto Alomar and umpire John Hirschbeck ended with the player spitting on the umpire -- an outrage that almost led the umpires to boycott baseball's play-offs.After a suspension for the first five days of the season, the Baltimore Orioles star resumed play yesterday just as it was announced that Lisa Pollak, a feature writer for The Sun, won a Pulitzer Prize for her story about the umpire's sons and their battles with a deadly disease.
NEWS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
CLEVELAND -- For two days, Cleveland Indians fans screamed at Roberto Alomar, booed him, held up signs that read "Spit Shield." In the end, he answered them without saying a word.Alomar had the game-tying single with two outs in the top of the ninth, and, three innings later, he hit a bases-empty home run and the Orioles knocked the defending American League champion Indians out of the playoffs with a 4-3 victory.Having won the best-of-five Division Series in four games, the Orioles will take on the Yankees in the AL Championship Series, which begins Tuesday in New York.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
LAST FALL, an argument between Orioles second-baseman Roberto Alomar and umpire John Hirschbeck ended with the player spitting on the umpire -- an outrage that almost led the umpires to boycott baseball's play-offs.After a suspension for the first five days of the season, the Baltimore Orioles star resumed play yesterday just as it was announced that Lisa Pollak, a feature writer for The Sun, won a Pulitzer Prize for her story about the umpire's sons and their battles with a deadly disease.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Buster Olney and Ken Rosenthal and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Roberto Alomar's marketing agent and Orioles owner Peter Angelos want John Hirschbeck to apologize for swearing at Alomar, saying the verbal attack prompted the second baseman to spit on the umpire last September in Toronto.But Hirschbeck said last night that he would not apologize, and maintained he was not to blame for the incident."Do I think I did anything wrong? In my opinion, I do not," Hirschbeck said from his home in Poland, Ohio. "Do I think I owe anyone an apology for anything I did?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.