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By ROGER SIMON | April 3, 1991
In February 1983, about two years after he was shot by John Hinckley, Ronald Reagan was asked the following question by a reporter:"Don't you think that things might have been different if Hinckley hadn't had more difficulty in being able to get a gun?"To which Reagan replied:"Sure would have been more comfortable, except that at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, thereabouts, out there surrounded by many of you, he did what he did in an area that has about the tTC strictest gun control laws that there are in the U.S."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Del Quentin Wilber, author of "Rawhide Down: The Near Assassination of Ronald Reagan," says that people often ask him, "Why do the book now? Don't we know that he got shot and lived?" What they won't know until they read the book is how close the country came to losing the president outside the Washington Hilton on March 30, 1981. It isn't just that Reagan lost half the blood in his body or that the bullet lodged in his left lung proved maddeningly difficult to find. Astonishingly, the Secret Service had started training its members for an immediate response to gunfire and injury only after the shooting of George Wallace in 1972, in Laurel — not after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- James Brady scanned the room with a professional eye and decided it was going to be a big day.There were 18 TV cameras set up in the House Judiciary Committee hearing room, and the number of cameras you attract in this town is one measure of your success.The last time James Brady was pushing the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act on Capitol Hill, only about eight cameras showed up.And members of the congressional leadership, who are critical for the bill's passage, were conspicuous in their absence.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
A Glen Arm woman accused of shooting her estranged husband to death is mentally ill, her attorney told a jury this morning, going so far as to compare Mary C. Koontz, 60, to John Hinckley Jr. — the man who shot former President Ronald Reagan — during opening arguments. Koontz, whose trial began today, faces seven charges, including first-degree murder and first-degree assault. The prosecution intends to seek a sentence of life in prison without parole. Ronald G. Koontz, a former teacher and wrestling coach at Towson High School who later became an administrator in the Baltimore County school system, was killed June 19, 2009, three days before father's day. Prosecutor Robin S. Coffin told the jury that Mary Koontz flew from Florida where she was living, woke up before 6 a.m. in the Towson hotel where she was staying, took the gun and ammunition she had earlier purchased and went to Glen Arm. There, Koontz parked at an adjoining property and snuck through the woods.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Arthur Bremer made clear in his diaries that he wanted the fame that came to the assassins who preceded him, the ones who killed President John F. Kennedy, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But he had much more in common with those who came later - John Hinckley, who wounded President Ronald Reagan, absurdly seeking the love of Jodie Foster; Mark David Chapman, who killed John Lennon saying The Catcher in the Rye would explain it;...
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- About 15 years ago, Beau Bridges was in a coffee shop on Ventura Boulevard when a robber "put a gun between my eyes. I've never forgotten it. He went in the back, and I jumped up and sped out of the place and got the police."Mr. Bridges was lucky that day, but on March 30, 1981, James Brady was not. His life was changed forever when he stepped into the path of a bullet intended for the president of the United States.Mr. Bridges stars as Mr. Brady in "Without Warning: The James Brady Story," chronicling the true story of the former presidential press secretary, from his rise in politics to his critical injury to his triumphant recovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Del Quentin Wilber, author of "Rawhide Down: The Near Assassination of Ronald Reagan," says that people often ask him, "Why do the book now? Don't we know that he got shot and lived?" What they won't know until they read the book is how close the country came to losing the president outside the Washington Hilton on March 30, 1981. It isn't just that Reagan lost half the blood in his body or that the bullet lodged in his left lung proved maddeningly difficult to find. Astonishingly, the Secret Service had started training its members for an immediate response to gunfire and injury only after the shooting of George Wallace in 1972, in Laurel — not after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | April 18, 2000
THE NEWS on John Hinckley Jr. is troubling. Officials at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington have recommended that Mr. Hinckley be released for unsupervised visits with his parents. The last such recommendation was turned down in 1997. Mr. Hinckley has been held for 19 years following a jury's finding of not guilty by reason of insanity in the shooting of President Ronald Reagan and others. Mr. Hinckley's efforts at conditional release are only the latest in a strange history of his attempts to gain freedom.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
A Glen Arm woman accused of shooting her estranged husband to death is mentally ill, her attorney told a jury this morning, going so far as to compare Mary C. Koontz, 60, to John Hinckley Jr. — the man who shot former President Ronald Reagan — during opening arguments. Koontz, whose trial began today, faces seven charges, including first-degree murder and first-degree assault. The prosecution intends to seek a sentence of life in prison without parole. Ronald G. Koontz, a former teacher and wrestling coach at Towson High School who later became an administrator in the Baltimore County school system, was killed June 19, 2009, three days before father's day. Prosecutor Robin S. Coffin told the jury that Mary Koontz flew from Florida where she was living, woke up before 6 a.m. in the Towson hotel where she was staying, took the gun and ammunition she had earlier purchased and went to Glen Arm. There, Koontz parked at an adjoining property and snuck through the woods.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 25, 1996
John W. Hinckley Jr.'s request is "very modest," his lawyer says.Fifteen years after he shot President Ronald Reagan and three others outside a Washington hotel, Hinckley wants monthly 12-hour leaves, always in his parents' custody, from the mental hospital where he's been confined since 1982.Hinckley, found not guilty by reason of insanity, "has recovered his sanity," his lawyer, Barry Levine, says in court papers. "His earlier diagnosed psychosis has abated and is in full remission."But government lawyers object.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Arthur Bremer made clear in his diaries that he wanted the fame that came to the assassins who preceded him, the ones who killed President John F. Kennedy, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But he had much more in common with those who came later - John Hinckley, who wounded President Ronald Reagan, absurdly seeking the love of Jodie Foster; Mark David Chapman, who killed John Lennon saying The Catcher in the Rye would explain it;...
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | April 18, 2000
THE NEWS on John Hinckley Jr. is troubling. Officials at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington have recommended that Mr. Hinckley be released for unsupervised visits with his parents. The last such recommendation was turned down in 1997. Mr. Hinckley has been held for 19 years following a jury's finding of not guilty by reason of insanity in the shooting of President Ronald Reagan and others. Mr. Hinckley's efforts at conditional release are only the latest in a strange history of his attempts to gain freedom.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 25, 1996
John W. Hinckley Jr.'s request is "very modest," his lawyer says.Fifteen years after he shot President Ronald Reagan and three others outside a Washington hotel, Hinckley wants monthly 12-hour leaves, always in his parents' custody, from the mental hospital where he's been confined since 1982.Hinckley, found not guilty by reason of insanity, "has recovered his sanity," his lawyer, Barry Levine, says in court papers. "His earlier diagnosed psychosis has abated and is in full remission."But government lawyers object.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- James Brady scanned the room with a professional eye and decided it was going to be a big day.There were 18 TV cameras set up in the House Judiciary Committee hearing room, and the number of cameras you attract in this town is one measure of your success.The last time James Brady was pushing the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act on Capitol Hill, only about eight cameras showed up.And members of the congressional leadership, who are critical for the bill's passage, were conspicuous in their absence.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- About 15 years ago, Beau Bridges was in a coffee shop on Ventura Boulevard when a robber "put a gun between my eyes. I've never forgotten it. He went in the back, and I jumped up and sped out of the place and got the police."Mr. Bridges was lucky that day, but on March 30, 1981, James Brady was not. His life was changed forever when he stepped into the path of a bullet intended for the president of the United States.Mr. Bridges stars as Mr. Brady in "Without Warning: The James Brady Story," chronicling the true story of the former presidential press secretary, from his rise in politics to his critical injury to his triumphant recovery.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 3, 1991
In February 1983, about two years after he was shot by John Hinckley, Ronald Reagan was asked the following question by a reporter:"Don't you think that things might have been different if Hinckley hadn't had more difficulty in being able to get a gun?"To which Reagan replied:"Sure would have been more comfortable, except that at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, thereabouts, out there surrounded by many of you, he did what he did in an area that has about the tTC strictest gun control laws that there are in the U.S."
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 9, 1994
If you're a believer in the pop culture marketplace, then you nTC know that no one loves a murderer like an American does.Popular iconography includes Billy the Kid, John Dillinger, and Bonnie and Clyde. But even those deemed too weird, psychotic or unredeemable for mass hero worship -- Chessman, DeSalvo, Gacy, Bundy -- have had their followings.They are written about, read about, studied by psychiatrists, law enforcers and loners. Recently serial killers have been put on the faces of a line of trading cards.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 26, 1995
John Hinckley, who shot Ronald Reagan and three other men in 1981, is now going to write books in order to pay up to $2.9 million to his victims.Excuse me?Did I miss something or isn't John Hinckley supposed to be nuts?Isn't that why he was found not guilty of the shootings? Isn't that why he never went to prison? Isn't that why he is in a mental hospital today?But now somebody is going to publish his work? And pay him millions of dollars to do it?Don't blame greedy publishers, however. The people promoting this deal are three of Hinckley's victims.
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