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BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | April 13, 1991
The troubled parent company of John Hanson Bank FSB announced yesterday that federal regulators are revoking a capital agreement with the bank because monetary requirements weren't met.The Treasury Department's Office of Thrift Supervision will ask Bethesda-based John Hanson Bancorp Inc. to consider a consent decree that could impose such restrictions as a prohibition on all lending and investments, or even the appointment of a conservator or receiver, John...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
"Many consider John Hanson, who was John Hanson Briscoe's relative and for whom he was named, as being the first president of the United States, and not George Washington," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, who was discussing the recent death of Briscoe, his longtime friend and former speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates. And regarding John Hanson's claim to being the first president, Hoyer is technically right. Hanson was elected the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation in 1781, several years before George Washington took the role under the newly formed United States.
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NEWS
By CHRIS LANDERS and CHRIS LANDERS,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
As area residents tuck into their traditional Maryland crab cakes and sauerkraut this Thanksgiving Day, they might want to take a moment away from all the palaver about pilgrims and Plymouth Rock to reflect on the Maryland statesman who really created the national holiday celebrated Thursday - John Hanson of Charles County. Or so say Hanson supporters. Actually, there is considerable disagreement among historians on who established the holiday. Hanson served as "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation in 1781 and '82. The Articles preceded the U.S. Constitution as an organizing document among the colonies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Judge John Hanson Briscoe Sr., scion of a prominent Southern Maryland family who served as speaker of the House of Delegates and later as a judge for the Circuit Court of St. Mary's County, died Wednesday of cancer at Half Pone Farm in Hollywood, St. Mary's County. He was 79. "John was a really great legislator and did a great job as speaker. He was very effective," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes. "He was very honorable and smart, and I'm really glad that I can call him a good friend.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
We mean no disrespect to John Hanson, a Colonial-era planter from Charles County whom most Marylanders haven't heard of, much less most Americans. He was a dedicated champion of American liberty from Great Britain and served in a variety of political posts during the Revolution and its aftermath, culminating in a one-year term as the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation. But the idea of replacing him as one of Maryland's two representatives in the U.S. Capitol's Hall of Statuary with Harriet Tubman is a good one. Hanson shares Maryland's allotment of two statues with Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and arguably the most important figure in the state during the era. No one is considering him for removal from the hall.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
The federal Office of Thrift Supervision has asked the management of John Hanson Savings Bank to consider signing a "consent agreement" that may include appointing a conservator or receiver, the troubled Beltsville thrift said today in a release.The board of the savings and loan said that it will consider the proposed terms and will most likely comply.Deposits at John Hanson, which has 15 branches in Maryland, continue to be insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.The action comes after regulators rejected the thrift's plan to raise capital.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | December 29, 1990
The financially strapped parent company of John Hanson Savings Bank FSB said yesterday that it expects to be unable to raise $10 million by year-end and will not meet capital requirements as planned under an agreement with federal regulators.The Beltsville-based thrift, with 15 branches and $875 million in assets, said it would continue its attempts to raise the additional funds "from all viable sources" and that it was working closely with the Office of Thrift Supervision, the federal agency that oversees the nation's savings and loan industry.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1990
John Hanson Savings Bank F.S.B.This Beltsville-based bank said yesterday it earned $480,000, or 8 cents a share, during its first fiscal quarter, which ended Sept. 30, compared with earnings of $2.1 million, or 37 cents a share, a year ago.John Hanson's operating results, however, represented a slight improvement over last year's first quarter during which the bank recorded one-time income of $2.7 million from the sale of $95 million of residential loans and securities.The company said that excluding last year's one-time gain, it recorded "substantial improvements" in its operating activities over last year, though the company's prepared statement did not elaborate.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | April 20, 1991
John Hanson Bancorp, unable to attract much-needed capital and suffering a large loss during the first three months of the year, has been placed under strict operating supervision by regulators because the company has fallen well below required capital levels.The Beltsville-based thrift, owner of John Hanson Savings Bank FSB, said yesterday that it lost $22.3 million, wiping out the stockholders' equity in the company and leaving it with liabilities that were $1.1 million greater than its assets.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
Edward R. Butler has 10 days to come up with more than $122,000 or he could finally lose his West Baltimore catering facility.Bankruptcy Judge E. Stephen Derby yesterday ordered John Hanson Savings Bank to hold off its auction of the Palladium scheduled for today. The reprieve is the latest in Butler's struggle to keep John Hanson and other creditors from selling the facility to satisfy debts. This auction was scheduled after Butler fell five months behind in mortgage payments on a $1.4 million loan used to build the hall, which opened in 1986.
EXPLORE
May 30, 2012
By Louise Vest 100 Years Ago A journey: Zion to Belmont From a 20-year look back column in the Times (1892): W.F. Iager of this county, and Miss Maggie Dinkleman, were married in Baltimore, at Zion Independent Lutheran Church. " Zion opened for worship before we were a country, in 1755 and grew along with the nation. Today they have many outreach projects, including assisting with disaster relief. During World War II, they housed service men on leave, giving 15,000 men lodging and breakfast during the war years.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | December 11, 2011
100 Years Ago Neighbors in war and peace Social news from Lawyers Hill in the Times: "Miss Warfield was the guest of Miss Mary Bowdoin on Sunday last. " From Pfeiffer's Corner social column: "Miss Alice Wheeler spent the weekend in the home of her brother in Baltimore. " According to an 1860s U.S. Geological Survey Map, Pfeiffer's Corner's surrounding neighbors were John Smallwood's acreage and Trinity Chapel. Neighbors a bit to the south were the Dorseys, Millers, Ridgleys and Rollinses.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
John Hanson's spot in the U.S. Capitol is secure, but Harriet Tubman's chances of securing one are spotty. The General Assembly has been weighing whether to swap in Tubman, who helped slaves travel to freedom on the Underground Railroad, for Hanson, a Southern Maryland merchant and former president of the Continental Congress, in the National Statuary Hall Collection. Each state is allowed only two statues in the collection. Maryland has been represented since 1903 by Hanson and Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
We mean no disrespect to John Hanson, a Colonial-era planter from Charles County whom most Marylanders haven't heard of, much less most Americans. He was a dedicated champion of American liberty from Great Britain and served in a variety of political posts during the Revolution and its aftermath, culminating in a one-year term as the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation. But the idea of replacing him as one of Maryland's two representatives in the U.S. Capitol's Hall of Statuary with Harriet Tubman is a good one. Hanson shares Maryland's allotment of two statues with Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and arguably the most important figure in the state during the era. No one is considering him for removal from the hall.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
A battle of historic proportions is shaping up in the Maryland General Assembly. On one side: admirers of Harriet Tubman, the Eastern Shore woman who famously helped slaves travel to freedom on the Underground Railroad. On the other: fans of John Hanson, a son of Southern Maryland and president of the Continental Congress, a precursor to the government of the United States. Maryland, one of the original 13 colonies and rich in history, typically embraces all of its notable figures.
NEWS
January 7, 2009
Margaret B. "Peggy" Krebs, a longtime Ruxton resident who was known for her homemade jams and chocolate sauce, died Friday of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 91. Margaret Lillington Boyden was born in Washington and raised near Glendale Heights in Prince George's County. She was educated in public and private schools, including St. Catherine's School in Richmond, Va. She attended American University and worked in the offices of the Washington National Cathedral before her 1941 marriage to Leon A. "Krebbie" Krebs.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
WALDORF - Forty-three minutes is only enough time for Cynthia W. Corbett to get started. There's so much to do: The teacher needs to read with her John Hanson Middle School students, have them read by themselves, work on the more complicated reading they have for their science and social studies classes and help them with their writing. One period - those 43 minutes - would never have cut it and would surely not have helped this Charles County school boost its scores on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program in every subject every year since the test was created.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
Gladys Hanson Millar Maglidt, who was Miss Maryland at the Fair of the Iron Horse in 1927, died July 24 of heart failure at her residence in Roland Park Place. She was 89.She had been chosen by the Baltimore and Ohio railroad to participate in the 1927 pageant at Halethorpe that commemorated the railroad's 100th anniversary. After the fair, the railroad sent her throughout the country as a goodwill ambassador.She joined the B&O in 1920 and worked in the treasurer's office until her retirement in 1945.
NEWS
By CHRIS LANDERS and CHRIS LANDERS,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
As area residents tuck into their traditional Maryland crab cakes and sauerkraut this Thanksgiving Day, they might want to take a moment away from all the palaver about pilgrims and Plymouth Rock to reflect on the Maryland statesman who really created the national holiday celebrated Thursday - John Hanson of Charles County. Or so say Hanson supporters. Actually, there is considerable disagreement among historians on who established the holiday. Hanson served as "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation in 1781 and '82. The Articles preceded the U.S. Constitution as an organizing document among the colonies.
TOPIC
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
IT'S AN OBSCURE piece of history long taught in some Maryland schools, hidden in some history books: A Charles County patriot named John Hanson - not George Washington - was the first president of the United States. This arcane truth, dear to Hanson's descendants and other Marylanders, says the country was formed in 1781 with the ratification of the Articles of Confederation, and someone had to be running the country a full eight years before Washington became president under the much-improved U.S. Constitution.
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