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John Gotti

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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
A man federal authorities describe as the personal bookmaker for reputed mob boss John Gotti has pleaded guilty to running a multimillion-dollar gambling operation.Dominic J. Curra, 47, of Lawrence, N.Y., entered a guilty plea yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of conspiracy to transmit sports wagering information in interstate commerce. An associate, Victor A. Mendez, 42, of Whitestone, N.Y., also pleaded guilty to the gambling conspiracy charge.Both men face a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine when they are sentenced Aug. 5 before District Judge J. Frederick Motz.
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NEWS
By Anthony M. Destefano and Anthony M. Destefano,Newsday | October 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- After escaping conviction on federal racketeering charges three times in roughly a year, John A. Gotti - the son of the late Gambino crime boss - will finally be able to pursue what he claims he has long desired: an ordinary life. Yesterday, in a widely expected move, federal prosecutors in Manhattan dropped efforts to convict Gotti. He has been free on bail since the most recent mistrial last month. "The government has concluded that a retrial of defendant John A. Gotti on the pending indictment is not in the interests of justice in light of the three prior hung juries in the case," said U.S. Attorney Michael J. Garcia in a statement released yesterday.
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NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore and New York say they have cracked a multi-million dollar, interstate gambling conspiracy with the arrest of a man they described as reputed mob boss John Gotti's "personal bookmaker."Dominic Curra, 47, of Lawrence,N.Y., was freed on $250,000 bail yesterday after agreeing to an arraignment in Baltimore on federal conspiracy and gambling charges.He also promised to avoid such underworld haunts as the Ravenite social club in New York's Little Italy, which prosectors said is Gotti's criminal headquarters.
TOPIC
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
Where have all the good bad guys gone? You know the type - the dashing, likable, maybe even lovable, rogue, craftier and a step faster than the authorities trying to catch him; one who steals mostly from the well-off and shares some of it with the less fortunate (preferably without comparing himself to Robin Hood); an outlaw who, if he does kill, does so only sparingly, and without consuming the casualties afterward. He comes from meager beginnings, usually; probably was a victim of some unfair treatment; and his lawbreaking - looked at in context - almost seems logical, maybe even just, especially if it involves some entity we'd all like to get revenge against.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
John Gotti is a thug and a racketeer. He is the head of the largest organized crime gang in greater New York and probably in the country. Federal prosecutors say he is a murderer. He is also an anachronism.Which is not to brush aside Mr. Gotti's trial on murder, conspiracy, extortion, racketeering, gambling and loansharking. It's a lot more than "GoodFellas" or "Bugsy" without the popcorn. Mr. Gotti commands a force of perhaps 400 hoodlums, one of the five notorious Mafia families in New York.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Firing questions with derision and disdain, a defense lawyer tore into Salvatore Gravano, attacking the character and credibility of the stoic Mafia turncoat who is the prosecution's crucial witness against John Gotti.On his first day of cross-examination yesterday, Gravano seemed coldly composed in general but a bit edgy at times as he leaned back in his seat and stared at his inquisitor, Albert J. Krieger, in the racketeering-murder trial at U.S. District Court in Brooklyn."When I was a kid, I was involved in gangs, dropped out of school in the eighth grade," Gravano said, explaining how he had begun a life of crime.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore and New York say they have cracked a multimillion-dollar interstate gambling conspiracy with the arrest of a man they described as the personal bookmaker of reputed mob boss John Gotti.Dominic Curra, 47, of Lawrence, N.Y., was freed on $250,000 bail yesterday on the condition that he will come to Baltimore later this month for an arraignment on federal conspiracy and gambling charges.Curra also had to promise to avoid such underworld haunts as the Ravenite social club in New York's Little Italy, which prosecutors said is Gotti's criminal headquarters.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
The Teflon finally wore off. John Gotti, the thug of thugs, the murderer of murderers, the corrupter of the corrupted, has finally got his comeuppance. Dubbed the "Teflon Don" because he eluded justice three times in the past six years, Gotti has been found guilty of enough crimes to keep him in prison for the rest of his life.Like many organisms that flash their most brilliant colors as they are dying, the flamboyant Gotti was a spectacular example of a vanishing species. Armed with stronger legal weapons, federal prosecutors have been beheading organized crime gangs around the country for the past decade.
NEWS
By Anthony M. Destefano and Anthony M. Destefano,Newsday | October 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- After escaping conviction on federal racketeering charges three times in roughly a year, John A. Gotti - the son of the late Gambino crime boss - will finally be able to pursue what he claims he has long desired: an ordinary life. Yesterday, in a widely expected move, federal prosecutors in Manhattan dropped efforts to convict Gotti. He has been free on bail since the most recent mistrial last month. "The government has concluded that a retrial of defendant John A. Gotti on the pending indictment is not in the interests of justice in light of the three prior hung juries in the case," said U.S. Attorney Michael J. Garcia in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
The co-owner of a Timonium print shop, who fellow merchants and police said was seven months pregnant, was found dead in her store of a head wound today. Investigators have described her death as suspicious.The body of Lewellen Masenior, 35, who operated the Print Shack in the Yorkshire Shopping Center with her husband, Michael, was found about 9 a.m. by county firefighters who shattered a front window to enter the shop.According to Baltimore County police spokesman E. Jay Miller, the woman usually went to work about 6 a.m. but normally didn't open the business until three hours later.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2002
John Gotti, who swaggered, schemed and murdered his way to the pinnacle of organized crime in America only to be toppled by secret FBI tapes and a turncoat mobster's testimony, died of cancer in a prison hospital in Springfield, Mo., yesterday while serving a life sentence. He was 61. Traditional Mafia leaders led publicity-shy lives. Not so Gotti, who reveled in media attention as the boss of the nation's largest and most influential organized crime group, the Gambino family. He cut a swashbuckling figure in New York City, wining and dining with show business celebrities in elegant restaurants and nightspots, surrounded by bodyguards.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 16, 1997
A hot marketing campaign is being waged for a crime-thriller novel of such improbability of provenance that several generations of American and Sicilian organized crime stalwarts dTC are surely spinning in their concrete overshoes, or however they may have been resting. From the back of the dust jacket blazes the picture you see here. In color. Vibrant. The book is "The Senator's Daughter," by Victoria Gotti. (Forge/St. Martin's. 303 pages. $23.95). On its dramatically black-and-white dust jacket, the volume's title appears in silver type that is a shade less than one-half inch high.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 25, 1994
EVERY politician in the United States obviously intends to run against crime as soon as possible. It is a noble strategy with a fatal flaw; to wit, it leaves a dearth of pro-crime candidates for crime-hating statesmen to run against.Many politicians, saying they fear a complete absence of crime-loving candidates will end their dreams of serving the public, have asked my help. And so, seizing the chance to mix business and patriotism, I now announce formation of a new company called the Pro-Crime Party Inc.For crime-hating politicians the Pro-Crime Party Inc. will provide candidates ready to stump in favor of such acts as armed robbery, auto theft, burglary, running a disorderly house and swindling the greedy with the old dropped-pocketbook scam.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A law professor got nothing but trouble from several Supreme Court justices as he argued yesterday that anti-abortion blockaders should be free to shut down clinics without facing heavy damage verdicts under a federal anti-racketeering law.G. Robert Blakey, a Notre Dame professor, appeared to make little headway as members of the court repeatedly demanded specific proof from him that Congress meant to leave out clinic attacks in 1970 when it adopted a law against mob violence: the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
A man federal authorities describe as the personal bookmaker for reputed mob boss John Gotti has pleaded guilty to running a multimillion-dollar gambling operation.Dominic J. Curra, 47, of Lawrence, N.Y., entered a guilty plea yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of conspiracy to transmit sports wagering information in interstate commerce. An associate, Victor A. Mendez, 42, of Whitestone, N.Y., also pleaded guilty to the gambling conspiracy charge.Both men face a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine when they are sentenced Aug. 5 before District Judge J. Frederick Motz.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
The Teflon finally wore off. John Gotti, the thug of thugs, the murderer of murderers, the corrupter of the corrupted, has finally got his comeuppance. Dubbed the "Teflon Don" because he eluded justice three times in the past six years, Gotti has been found guilty of enough crimes to keep him in prison for the rest of his life.Like many organisms that flash their most brilliant colors as they are dying, the flamboyant Gotti was a spectacular example of a vanishing species. Armed with stronger legal weapons, federal prosecutors have been beheading organized crime gangs around the country for the past decade.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 16, 1997
A hot marketing campaign is being waged for a crime-thriller novel of such improbability of provenance that several generations of American and Sicilian organized crime stalwarts dTC are surely spinning in their concrete overshoes, or however they may have been resting. From the back of the dust jacket blazes the picture you see here. In color. Vibrant. The book is "The Senator's Daughter," by Victoria Gotti. (Forge/St. Martin's. 303 pages. $23.95). On its dramatically black-and-white dust jacket, the volume's title appears in silver type that is a shade less than one-half inch high.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- That ominous fellow in the black trench coat carrying a violin case outside federal court in Brooklyn during John Gotti's murder trial Wednesday was, purportedly, "a face."A "face," said Douglas LeVien, a former New York City police detective who worked undercover investigating the mob, is "a guy who looks like a mobster's supposed to look.""They send him to scare the hell out of someone, like 'Go send a face,' " Mr. LeVien said.But the man in the trench coat was an actor, hired by a publicist, and the violin case was stuffed with copies of "Goombata: The Improbable Rise and Fall of John Gotti and His Gang," by John Cummings and Ernest Volkman -- one of at least two dozen books about the Mafia published in the last five years.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- That ominous fellow in the black trench coat carrying a violin case outside federal court in Brooklyn during John Gotti's murder trial Wednesday was, purportedly, "a face."A "face," said Douglas LeVien, a former New York City police detective who worked undercover investigating the mob, is "a guy who looks like a mobster's supposed to look.""They send him to scare the hell out of someone, like 'Go send a face,' " Mr. LeVien said.But the man in the trench coat was an actor, hired by a publicist, and the violin case was stuffed with copies of "Goombata: The Improbable Rise and Fall of John Gotti and His Gang," by John Cummings and Ernest Volkman -- one of at least two dozen books about the Mafia published in the last five years.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maybe this "Teflon Don" John Gotti isn't so slick after all.How else to explain why he talked when he should have walked, why he trusted an underboss who turned rat, and why, no matter how expensive his suits and how silken his socks, the minute he opens his mouth he comes across like a high school tough who just discovered four-letter words?Yet this is the same John Gotti who has avoided jail terms three times in six years because prosecutors couldn't make the charges stick and who is reputed to have battled to the top of the Gambino crime family, reigning dynasty of the Mafia.
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