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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Special to The Sun | August 3, 1995
San Diego -- What makes a popular television and film star return to the stage after an eight-year absence? Simple, says John Goodman.Who could turn down $650 a week, compared to a rumored $100,000 per "Roseanne" episode? Who could resist the "blinding fear" of failure? Why pass up the opportunity to "fret and sweat and have screaming nightmares, literally, every night during rehearsal, worrying about getting this thing done?"The thing in question: William Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Parts I and II," closing Sunday after a hugely popular engagement on the Old Globe Theatre's outdoor stage.
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By Noel Holston and Noel Holston,NEWSDAY | September 24, 2003
Meet the new boss. Definitely not the same as the old boss. House Speaker Walken (John Goodman), who's running The West Wing's parallel USA while President Bartlet (Martin Sheen) sweats out his daughter's abduction, couldn't be much more different. Walken is bellicose where Bartlet is reasonable, impulsive where Bartlet is deliberative, uncouth where Bartlet is genteel, earthy where Bartlet is academic. Some may see him as a stand-in - and parody of - George W. Bush. But his hard-right leanings notwithstanding, the president whom Walken most recalls is the notoriously loud and vulgar Lyndon B. Johnson.
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By Noel Holston and Noel Holston,NEWSDAY | September 24, 2003
Meet the new boss. Definitely not the same as the old boss. House Speaker Walken (John Goodman), who's running The West Wing's parallel USA while President Bartlet (Martin Sheen) sweats out his daughter's abduction, couldn't be much more different. Walken is bellicose where Bartlet is reasonable, impulsive where Bartlet is deliberative, uncouth where Bartlet is genteel, earthy where Bartlet is academic. Some may see him as a stand-in - and parody of - George W. Bush. But his hard-right leanings notwithstanding, the president whom Walken most recalls is the notoriously loud and vulgar Lyndon B. Johnson.
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Any sports movie has a dual task: to simulate the game of choice (football, hockey, golf) and to unfurl its characters' journeys against that backdrop. Ex-ballplayer and first-time director Ron Shelton pulled it off in Bull Durham (1988), a film whose world was so steeped in authentic detail we could care about the characters. But hockey fans cringed at the sight of Rob Lowe's efforts to skate in Youngblood (1986), and seamheads winced at the double debacle of William Bendix (1948) and John Goodman (1992)
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 29, 1998
It's as if "Roseanne" never went off the air. Or, at least, as if Dan Conner never died.Four films featuring John Goodman, the big, versatile actor who co-starred in the wildly successful sitcom, have been released in the first 10 weeks of 1998.In "Fallen," he plays a cop on the trail of a supernatural killer. In "Blues Brothers 2000," the sequel to the 1980 car wreck and R&B comedy, Goodman can be spotted in the regulation black suit, shades and porkpie hat, belting out songs as he hasn't since his Broadway breakthrough, "Big River," 13 years ago.In "The Borrowers," a Gulliver-esque children's fantasy, 4-inch-tall sprites take on Goodman's greedy, full-size lawyer.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Linda Tripp gets off scot-free -- in Maryland's judicial system. Won't face 10 years in prison. Doesn't have to worry about a $20,000 fine for her alleged violation of the state's wiretap laws back in December 1997, when she began compiling her tape library of Monica Lewinsky's confidences. But for those of you who think Tripp is lucky -- she was, by the way, the only major figure in the impeachment scandal to face a criminal charge -- consider the sentence doled out, one liner at a time, in the court of public opinion.
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By Todd Camp and Todd Camp,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 24, 1993
There's a very good reason Walt Disney has cornered the market when it comes to animated features. Artistic excellence and musical savvy aside, the company's strongest suit is its understanding that a successful animated feature should delight adults as much as it does their offspring.To his credit, Steven Spielberg is a kid at heart. When it comes to the Saturday matinee motion picture romp, nobody does it better. But when it comes to animation, he bites."We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story," the fourth Spielberg-produced animated feature and second from his still-fledgling company Amblimation, shares the same faults as its three predecessors: "An American Tail," "The Land Before Time," and "An American Tail: Fievel Goes West."
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By Lou Cedrone | February 15, 1991
Universal may know something more than we do. They have reportedly signed John Goodman to a three-picture deal on the strength of his ''King Ralph,'' a comedy that opens here today.''King Ralph'' may do big business, but it won't be because it is a very special film. It is, in fact, a rather ordinary, almost trivial, movie, and Goodman, its biggest asset, may also be its biggest liability.He has a comic image. As the television husband to Roseanne Barr on the Barr comedy series, he carries some baggage with him, enough to encourage the movie spectator to expect a little more of the film.
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By Stephen Hunter | January 30, 1993
MOVIES'Matinee'"Matinee" is wonderful fun. It's set in 1962 as fabled movie legend Lawrence Woolsey (the gigantic John Goodman) is premiering his classic "Mant!" (half man, half ant, all terror!) in sleepy Key West, Fla, using every gimmick known to man or beast. It's hard to get anybody's attention, however, because the world seems inclined to end in fire . . . the Cuban Missile Crisis. "Matinee" follows as the ever-energetic Woolsey tries to whip up attention, and the grown-ups and kids of Key West try to decide which is more important, "Mant" or the end of civilization.
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By Cindy Pearlman and Cindy Pearlman,Special to The Sun | May 27, 1994
It took just one night for John Goodman to get the yell down.He didn't want it to be a wimpy bellow. He had to find the right pitch -- the right note of desperation mixed with frustration."
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Linda Tripp gets off scot-free -- in Maryland's judicial system. Won't face 10 years in prison. Doesn't have to worry about a $20,000 fine for her alleged violation of the state's wiretap laws back in December 1997, when she began compiling her tape library of Monica Lewinsky's confidences. But for those of you who think Tripp is lucky -- she was, by the way, the only major figure in the impeachment scandal to face a criminal charge -- consider the sentence doled out, one liner at a time, in the court of public opinion.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 29, 1998
It's as if "Roseanne" never went off the air. Or, at least, as if Dan Conner never died.Four films featuring John Goodman, the big, versatile actor who co-starred in the wildly successful sitcom, have been released in the first 10 weeks of 1998.In "Fallen," he plays a cop on the trail of a supernatural killer. In "Blues Brothers 2000," the sequel to the 1980 car wreck and R&B comedy, Goodman can be spotted in the regulation black suit, shades and porkpie hat, belting out songs as he hasn't since his Broadway breakthrough, "Big River," 13 years ago.In "The Borrowers," a Gulliver-esque children's fantasy, 4-inch-tall sprites take on Goodman's greedy, full-size lawyer.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Special to The Sun | August 3, 1995
San Diego -- What makes a popular television and film star return to the stage after an eight-year absence? Simple, says John Goodman.Who could turn down $650 a week, compared to a rumored $100,000 per "Roseanne" episode? Who could resist the "blinding fear" of failure? Why pass up the opportunity to "fret and sweat and have screaming nightmares, literally, every night during rehearsal, worrying about getting this thing done?"The thing in question: William Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Parts I and II," closing Sunday after a hugely popular engagement on the Old Globe Theatre's outdoor stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cindy Pearlman and Cindy Pearlman,Special to The Sun | May 27, 1994
It took just one night for John Goodman to get the yell down.He didn't want it to be a wimpy bellow. He had to find the right pitch -- the right note of desperation mixed with frustration."
FEATURES
By Todd Camp and Todd Camp,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 24, 1993
There's a very good reason Walt Disney has cornered the market when it comes to animated features. Artistic excellence and musical savvy aside, the company's strongest suit is its understanding that a successful animated feature should delight adults as much as it does their offspring.To his credit, Steven Spielberg is a kid at heart. When it comes to the Saturday matinee motion picture romp, nobody does it better. But when it comes to animation, he bites."We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story," the fourth Spielberg-produced animated feature and second from his still-fledgling company Amblimation, shares the same faults as its three predecessors: "An American Tail," "The Land Before Time," and "An American Tail: Fievel Goes West."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | January 30, 1993
MOVIES'Matinee'"Matinee" is wonderful fun. It's set in 1962 as fabled movie legend Lawrence Woolsey (the gigantic John Goodman) is premiering his classic "Mant!" (half man, half ant, all terror!) in sleepy Key West, Fla, using every gimmick known to man or beast. It's hard to get anybody's attention, however, because the world seems inclined to end in fire . . . the Cuban Missile Crisis. "Matinee" follows as the ever-energetic Woolsey tries to whip up attention, and the grown-ups and kids of Key West try to decide which is more important, "Mant" or the end of civilization.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Any sports movie has a dual task: to simulate the game of choice (football, hockey, golf) and to unfurl its characters' journeys against that backdrop. Ex-ballplayer and first-time director Ron Shelton pulled it off in Bull Durham (1988), a film whose world was so steeped in authentic detail we could care about the characters. But hockey fans cringed at the sight of Rob Lowe's efforts to skate in Youngblood (1986), and seamheads winced at the double debacle of William Bendix (1948) and John Goodman (1992)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 22, 2007
In Evan Almighty, when the Good Lord (Morgan Freeman) rounds up dozens of species for his latter-day Noah, Evan Baxter, to take into a contemporary ark, he doesn't provide any turkeys. The moviemakers take care of that. Evan Almighty (Universal Pictures) Starring Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman, Lauren Graham, John Goodman. Directed by Tom Shadyac. Rated PG. Time 95 minutes.
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By Lou Cedrone | February 15, 1991
Universal may know something more than we do. They have reportedly signed John Goodman to a three-picture deal on the strength of his ''King Ralph,'' a comedy that opens here today.''King Ralph'' may do big business, but it won't be because it is a very special film. It is, in fact, a rather ordinary, almost trivial, movie, and Goodman, its biggest asset, may also be its biggest liability.He has a comic image. As the television husband to Roseanne Barr on the Barr comedy series, he carries some baggage with him, enough to encourage the movie spectator to expect a little more of the film.
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