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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
GREENBELT -- John Glenn, U.S. senator and 77-year-old space pioneer, rocketed back into space on a pillar of fame and nostalgia yesterday as he and six other astronauts began a nine-day mission of scientific research on the space shuttle Discovery."
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 7, 2010
Ralph Vanderlipp, an electrical engineer whose work spanned the eras from World War II to the space age and into the computer age, died Nov. 3 of leukemia at Gilchrest Hospice Care in Towson. The long-time Columbia resident was 83. From serving as an electronics and radar technician on a cargo ship during the waning days of World War II to helping interpret data from the Hubble Space telescope, Mr. Vanderlipp spent decades on the cutting edge of electronics technology. "If you were to look up 'electrical engineer' in the dictionary, you would see his picture," said Bill Anderson, who was a young aerospace engineer working under contract for Lockheed-Martin when he first met Mr. Vanderlipp and considered him a mentor.
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NEWS
January 17, 1998
BABY BOOMERS get to resurrect one of their heroes. John Glenn, who 36 years ago became the first American to orbit Earth, has been approved to take a space shuttle flight later this year. He will be 77 years old. The space agency, trying to justify what some view as a wildly expensive stunt, says the mission will provide valuable data about space flight's effect on the elderly. But Story Musgrave, 61, was on a 1996 shuttle flight, and Mr. Glenn is said to be in better shape than many younger men.A shuttle ride for Mr. Glenn, however, has greater value than providing a nostalgia trip for the generation that now gets to decide such things.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 10, 2003
The two-disc, 20th- anniversary DVD reissue of The Right Stuff is jam-packed with enticing extras ranging from deleted scenes to interviews with actors and astronauts. But on the phone from his San Francisco office, writer-director Philip Kaufman says he's thrilled mostly because the movie can be seen in pristine form on the first disc, sans frou-frou, and that "people will again have a chance to discover it." What they'll get is an eye-popping, hilarious and inspirational epic whose time may well be now. Today, this box-office disappointment registers as the source of some of the richest, most dynamic and even most profitable personalities, images and modes of moviemaking in the past two decades of American film.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
As a guinea pig in sleep studies during the space shuttle Discovery's coming flight, John Glenn was prepared to answer questions about his age and his normal sleep habits.But he wasn't going to tell the nosey reporters everything."I won't tell you how many times a night I get up," the 77-year-old space pioneer and U.S. senator said, to gales of laughter. "I don't know that that's any of your business, really."Glenn is a payload specialist on the flight, with fewer logged hours of space travel than all but the flight's one rookie.
NEWS
October 26, 1998
PEOPLE ARE fickle. All the "oohs" over photographs taken by the little Pathfinder robot on Mars last year have been replaced by a general public attitude toward space exploration of "so what?"Last year, the nation's space administration chief, Daniel S. Goldin, basked in the glow of a successful mission to the Red Planet. This year, though, Mr. Goldin has had to threaten to kill the space station project to get Congress to give it more money.Once again, NASA needs to generate public excitement.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
The old man hasn't even been sick to his stomach -- he's been up there trading one-liners with Jay Leno, for heaven's sake.At 77, John Glenn is flying flawlessly through the hoops and motions aboard the space shuttle Discovery, set to return today. If research warrants, NASA administrator Daniel Goldin has promised to send more seniors into space. "Famous people" are apparently lining up for space flight, he says. NASA didn't name names, but just imagine -- a shuttle mission featuring an entire crew of celebrity 77-year-olds.
NEWS
By Thomas Graves and Thomas Graves,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
This week John Glenn returns to space, considerably older than he was in 1962 when he became the first American to orbit the earth. With considerably less fanfare, the organization that is sending him off has itself become middle-aged.NASA turned 40 this month. On Oct. 1, 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration officially opened its doors as a government agency charged with getting machines and mankind into outer space.The agency was born a year, almost to the day, after the Russians launched the world's first artificial earth satellite on Oct. 4, 1957.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
The last time John Glenn flew in space, he was 40 years old. His Mercury space capsule had 56 toggle switches, 143 cockpit displays and no on-board computers.When the shuttle Discovery leaps off the launch pad this week, with a 77-year-old Glenn strapped in below decks, pilot Steven W. Lindsey will command five computers, and a dashboard crammed with 856 toggles and 2,312 displays.This is not your grandfather's spaceship. And fortunately for all on board, the World War II fighter pilot -- born six years before Charles Lindbergh made the first solo flight across the Atlantic -- will not be flying it.Nor will he deploy the Spartan solar observatory, test equipment to be used in the next servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, or help with observations of Jupiter by the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2002
In light of the momentous events of Sept. 11, it would be easy to recall this week's own momentous date in history, Feb. 20, 1962, as little more than the anniversary of an early show of Cold War theatrics. No lives were lost. No enemies shackled. No impending catastrophe averted. Certainly, the short orbital adventure of astronaut John H. Glenn held a nation rapt. Teachers canceled classes. Tens of millions of Americans tuned in on transistor radios or gathered around TV sets for one of the first experiences of nationalistic communing via television.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2002
In light of the momentous events of Sept. 11, it would be easy to recall this week's own momentous date in history, Feb. 20, 1962, as little more than the anniversary of an early show of Cold War theatrics. No lives were lost. No enemies shackled. No impending catastrophe averted. Certainly, the short orbital adventure of astronaut John H. Glenn held a nation rapt. Teachers canceled classes. Tens of millions of Americans tuned in on transistor radios or gathered around TV sets for one of the first experiences of nationalistic communing via television.
NEWS
July 22, 1999
S. Robert Kinghorn, 66, Beth Steel controllerS. Robert Kinghorn, retired controller of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, died of cancer Sunday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 66 and lived in Glen Arm.He joined the accounting department at Beth Steel's old Key Highway ship repair yard in 1959, served in a similar position in Hoboken, N.J., and then was named assistant auditor general in Bethlehem, Pa. He was appointed controller at Sparrows Point in 1980 and retired in 1992.Born in Piermont, N.H., he received a degree in business administration from Boston University in 1958 after having served in the Air Force.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
The old man hasn't even been sick to his stomach -- he's been up there trading one-liners with Jay Leno, for heaven's sake.At 77, John Glenn is flying flawlessly through the hoops and motions aboard the space shuttle Discovery, set to return today. If research warrants, NASA administrator Daniel Goldin has promised to send more seniors into space. "Famous people" are apparently lining up for space flight, he says. NASA didn't name names, but just imagine -- a shuttle mission featuring an entire crew of celebrity 77-year-olds.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When his political life turned sour, Sen. John Glenn would park outside the Air and Space Museum.He'd slip among tourists clustered around his old Friendship 7 capsule. Daughter Lynn remembers him gazing at the silvery, bell-shaped capsule -- a tin can the size of Cadillac trunk -- in which he became the first American in orbit.Mr. Glenn told her, "I wanted to remember that once I'd been somebody part of something big and important."Anybody doubt John Glenn is again somebody part of something big?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1998
HOUSTON -- Taking a break from a regimen of medical tests aboard the orbiting shuttle Discovery, John Glenn yesterday fielded questions from earthbound students, one of whom quickly asked if the world's oldest astronaut feels younger in space."
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | October 31, 1998
I WASN'T present for the birth of my family's best-loved pooch, a black Lab named Rocky, a great dog born Feb. 20, 1962, the day John Glenn blasted off. The name fit as naturally as he found a place within that Guilford Avenue household of 12.The John Glenn flight was one of those defining moments of the 1960s -- a pinpoint of time you always remember. I was in school, sixth grade, the day the astronaut took off.I retain a a recollection of Sister Mary Magdeline, in her full black habit and long veil, clutching a transistor radio, calling out the news reports to the class.
NEWS
July 22, 1999
S. Robert Kinghorn, 66, Beth Steel controllerS. Robert Kinghorn, retired controller of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, died of cancer Sunday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 66 and lived in Glen Arm.He joined the accounting department at Beth Steel's old Key Highway ship repair yard in 1959, served in a similar position in Hoboken, N.J., and then was named assistant auditor general in Bethlehem, Pa. He was appointed controller at Sparrows Point in 1980 and retired in 1992.Born in Piermont, N.H., he received a degree in business administration from Boston University in 1958 after having served in the Air Force.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 30, 1998
Walter Cronkite was there cracking lame jokes and telling us how President Kennedy would have felt. Dan Rather was in full "Texas Dan" mode, calling people "hoss" and analyzing how much "giddyup" there was in those rocket boosters. Tom Brokaw and Brian Williams were giving new meaning to the word "gush."It was a big day on Planet Spectacle in the galaxy of television news yesterday as John Glenn, the 77-year-old Democratic senator from Ohio, joined six astronauts aboard the space shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Liz Bowie, Jackie Powder, Joe Nawrozki and Carl Schoettler contributed to this article | October 30, 1998
Three minutes before the blastoff of space shuttle Discovery, Sara Cambias was nervous."I don't want anything to happen to him," said the Sykesville Middle School pupil.In unison, Cambias' classmates shouted the last 10 seconds of yesterday's countdown and then watched 77-year-old John Glenn roar into the stratosphere to become the oldest astronaut ever -- and possibly a new hero to these cheering, clapping eighth-graders."I just think it's pretty interesting that a guy that old would actually be brave enough to go into space," said Kristina Letmate.
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