Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJohn Frankenheimer
IN THE NEWS

John Frankenheimer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2002
LOS ANGELES - John Frankenheimer, one of the foremost directors of the 1960s with classic films such as The Manchurian Candidate, Seven Days in May, Birdman of Alcatraz and The Train, died of a massive stroke yesterday from complications after spinal surgery. He was 72. Mr. Frankenheimer, whose career stumbled badly in the late 1970s and 1980s because of personal problems and alcoholism, returned in the 1990s with significant television work that was flourishing at the time of his death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2002
LOS ANGELES - John Frankenheimer, one of the foremost directors of the 1960s with classic films such as The Manchurian Candidate, Seven Days in May, Birdman of Alcatraz and The Train, died of a massive stroke yesterday from complications after spinal surgery. He was 72. Mr. Frankenheimer, whose career stumbled badly in the late 1970s and 1980s because of personal problems and alcoholism, returned in the 1990s with significant television work that was flourishing at the time of his death.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 1997
TNT offers a double dose of presidential paranoia tonight, courtesy of director John Frankenheimer (whose most recent work, "George Wallace," debuted on TNT last weekend). Both are taut, suspenseful and pretty much guaranteed to hook you, once started, into watching the whole thing.First up is "The Manchurian Candidate" (8 p.m.-10: 45 p.m.), with Laurence Harvey as a brainwashed Korean War vet with his sights set on the White House. Frank Sinatra is the commanding officer whose brain has been similarly programmed, although perhaps not as well.
FEATURES
By Tom Siebert and Tom Siebert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 2001
This summer's coolest action hero is tooling around with some of the best directors in Hollywood, but he can't be found at the multiplex. Part James Bond, part Mad Max, part Man with No Name, he's a chilly lone wolf with a heart of gold. He's unflappable under pressure. He works for clients ranging from diamond smugglers to movie stars to the United Nations. He's got presence to spare and charisma to burn. And he's selling BMWs. Known only as The Driver, and played with compelling minimalist range by the understated British actor Clive Owen (from last summer's art-house hit Croupier and the PBS mystery series Second Sight)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
The best movie thrillers, no matter how outrageous the plot twists or how fickle the characters, exhibit their own sense of logic. The stories may turn on a dime, the narrative may leave the viewer with a severe case of whiplash, but the audience keeps believing. Then there are the thrillers where the writers insert a plot twist just because it's time for a plot twist, shift a character's mood simply because they can and carefully calculate the number of turns-on-a-dime. The audience never starts believing.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
''Year of the Gun'' has its good and bad points. Done by John Frankenheimer (''Manchurian Candidate''), the film begins to intrigue toward close, but there is much to endure before we get there.It isn't so much the director's fault. Well, it was he who decided to do a film about Italy's Red Brigades, so he has to share some of the blame.The basic trouble with the film is that it all seems so silly. Yes, the Red Brigades were real. Yes, they caused as much trouble in Italy as the '60s rebel groups caused in this country, but it is difficult to make these people seem less than childish.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
John Frankenheimer doesn't see why more directors haven't split their time between movies and television. He has, with impressive results, including a string of Emmys and a handful of theatrical films that can legitimately be called classics.His latest entry in a career that extends over four decades is "Ronin," a post Cold-War thriller in which Robert De Niro leads a pack of leaderless mercenaries on a cat-and-mouse hunt through the narrow streets of southern France.Filled with the elements for which Frankenheimer has become renowned -- duplicitous spies, shadowy authority figures, intricate plotting -- "Ronin" is further proof that he is one of those rare directors whose work is truly timeless.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
This time, Ted Turner and his folks did it right. And the result is one of the finest historical dramas, if not one of the finest movies, period, to show up on TV in many a year.The two-part "Andersonville," works on pretty-much every level: It's good history, good drama, good filmmaking and -- provided you don't mind being made a little uncomfortable -- good entertainment.As such, it succeeds where Turner's earlier Civil War-epic, "Gettysburg," failed. That monolith had scope, fine battle scenes and a wonderful performance from Jeff Daniels.
FEATURES
By Tom Siebert and Tom Siebert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 2001
This summer's coolest action hero is tooling around with some of the best directors in Hollywood, but he can't be found at the multiplex. Part James Bond, part Mad Max, part Man with No Name, he's a chilly lone wolf with a heart of gold. He's unflappable under pressure. He works for clients ranging from diamond smugglers to movie stars to the United Nations. He's got presence to spare and charisma to burn. And he's selling BMWs. Known only as The Driver, and played with compelling minimalist range by the understated British actor Clive Owen (from last summer's art-house hit Croupier and the PBS mystery series Second Sight)
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 20, 1990
HOLLYWOOD Sharon Stone and Valeria Golino join Andrew McCarthy in John Frankenheimer's political thriller, "The Year of the Gun," which will shoot in Rome this October. The Edward R. Pressman production concerns the paranoia that took place in Italy during the Red Brigade's 1978 reign of terror. David Ambroise wrote the screenplay from a Michael Mewshaw novel.Eric Roberts will star in Shooter Productions' "Midnight Sun" (aka "Burning Bridges"), a murder mystery about a New Yorker caught up in a fast Hollywood crowd.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
The best movie thrillers, no matter how outrageous the plot twists or how fickle the characters, exhibit their own sense of logic. The stories may turn on a dime, the narrative may leave the viewer with a severe case of whiplash, but the audience keeps believing. Then there are the thrillers where the writers insert a plot twist just because it's time for a plot twist, shift a character's mood simply because they can and carefully calculate the number of turns-on-a-dime. The audience never starts believing.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
John Frankenheimer doesn't see why more directors haven't split their time between movies and television. He has, with impressive results, including a string of Emmys and a handful of theatrical films that can legitimately be called classics.His latest entry in a career that extends over four decades is "Ronin," a post Cold-War thriller in which Robert De Niro leads a pack of leaderless mercenaries on a cat-and-mouse hunt through the narrow streets of southern France.Filled with the elements for which Frankenheimer has become renowned -- duplicitous spies, shadowy authority figures, intricate plotting -- "Ronin" is further proof that he is one of those rare directors whose work is truly timeless.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 1997
TNT offers a double dose of presidential paranoia tonight, courtesy of director John Frankenheimer (whose most recent work, "George Wallace," debuted on TNT last weekend). Both are taut, suspenseful and pretty much guaranteed to hook you, once started, into watching the whole thing.First up is "The Manchurian Candidate" (8 p.m.-10: 45 p.m.), with Laurence Harvey as a brainwashed Korean War vet with his sights set on the White House. Frank Sinatra is the commanding officer whose brain has been similarly programmed, although perhaps not as well.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
This time, Ted Turner and his folks did it right. And the result is one of the finest historical dramas, if not one of the finest movies, period, to show up on TV in many a year.The two-part "Andersonville," works on pretty-much every level: It's good history, good drama, good filmmaking and -- provided you don't mind being made a little uncomfortable -- good entertainment.As such, it succeeds where Turner's earlier Civil War-epic, "Gettysburg," failed. That monolith had scope, fine battle scenes and a wonderful performance from Jeff Daniels.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
''Year of the Gun'' has its good and bad points. Done by John Frankenheimer (''Manchurian Candidate''), the film begins to intrigue toward close, but there is much to endure before we get there.It isn't so much the director's fault. Well, it was he who decided to do a film about Italy's Red Brigades, so he has to share some of the blame.The basic trouble with the film is that it all seems so silly. Yes, the Red Brigades were real. Yes, they caused as much trouble in Italy as the '60s rebel groups caused in this country, but it is difficult to make these people seem less than childish.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1998
You don't know much about these guys. Only that they've got a job to do.John Frankenheimer's "Ronin" doesn't worry much (if at all) about motivation or background or what its characters do when they're not skulking about the soft underbelly of southern France. What it does worry about is the job, and how these guys come together to pull it off.Or not. Because in "Ronin," a masterly tale of intrigue from an old hand at the genre, you're never quite sure who's doing what, who's loyal to whom, whose allegiances lie where.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 27, 1998
It's Friday night, and you're at the movies, watching the black comedy "Very Bad Things." During the bachelor party scene, a stripper is brought out, and as she begins to do her thing, a light bulb goes on in your head."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.