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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 20, 1993
True story: A would-be scriptwriter, new to Hollywood, is going in to a meeting with a big executive. His would-be producer and soon to be ex-partner suddenly says, "Suppose he asks you, 'What movie is your script like?' What would you say?"The writer, an extremely wonderful and brilliant man, says, "He's not going to ask that."L But the producer, an idiot, responds, "But suppose he does."The writer thinks a moment and then says, "The Searchers."The producer nods sagely and then says, "Hmmm.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
John C. Ford Jr., who as a young World War II cryptanalyst was part of a team whose work resulted in the shooting down of the bomber carrying Japanese Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, died Wednesday from respiratory failure at a son's Arnold home. He was 94. The son of an oil salesman and a homemaker, John Cecil Ford Jr. was born in Federal Hill and raised in Catonsville, where he ran track and played lacrosse at Catonsville High School. He graduated from there in 1935. "He was at the Baltimore Business College at the time of Pearl Harbor, and he was about to be drafted into the Army.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 12, 2006
YOUNG MR. LINCOLN / / The Criterion Collection / $39.95 John Ford understood that democracy isn't just a form of government. It's a feeling that mingles liberty, possibility and fellowship -- and it can't be faked, no matter how hard politicians try. Ford's 1939 masterpiece Young Mr. Lincoln (due out Tuesday) portrays the Republican statesman as a small-D democrat to his bones. It's neither a biography nor a tract. It's a loving riff on Lincoln as the embodiment of the best in American character.
EXPLORE
July 15, 2011
Peggy Joseph Ford and John Ford, of Easton, have announced the engagement of their son, Ben Ford, to Kate Livie, of Chestertown. The bride to be is the daughter of the late Kent County Commissioner Scott Livie and Robin Bayne, of Chestertown. Livie is the granddaughter of Jeanne Livie Tarring and Hartley Bayne and the late Patricia Bayne, all of Chestertown. Kate is a graduate of Towson University and the assistant director of education at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
To say John Ford directed Westerns is seriously to underplay the point.Yes, he was probably responsible for more classic Westerns than any director, everything from 1924's "The Iron Horse," the story of the first transcontinental railroad, to 1962's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence," a nod to the idea that Western myth was often more important than Western fact.Yes, he directed both 1939's "Stagecoach" and 1956's "The Searchers," films that define the Western genre. And yes, he discovered John Wayne.
TRAVEL
By Brian Downes and By Brian Downes,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2000
In "Cinema Southwest," a comprehensive guide to Western movies and their locations, author John A. Murray writes: "We can imagine a Southwest without Bryce Canyon, or even without Zion, just as we can imagine a person without an arm or a leg, but a Southwest without Monument Valley is inconceivable." As mysterious as it is majestic, the harsh and desolate terrain that straddles the Arizona-Utah border some 20 miles north of Kayenta, Ariz., is -- thanks hugely to the classic Westerns of filmmaker John Ford -- the most recognizable landscape in the entire West.
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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Anageles Times | November 7, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Peter Bogdanovich's rarely screened 1971 documentary Directed by John Ford has taken on almost mythic proportions over the decades. Narrated by Bogdanovich's good friend, director Orson Welles, the film featured interviews with the crusty, cantankerous Oscar-winning Ford as well as John Wayne, Henry Fonda and Jimmy Stewart, who had appeared in many of Ford's films. Directed by John Ford airs at 8 and 11:30 tonight on Turner Classic Movies.
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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1995
"Katharine Hepburn," by Barbara Leaming. 560 pages. New York: Crown Publishers. $27.50Tracy and Hepburn: They were the ideal couple, on screen and off. She was strong-willed, fiercely intelligent, tough-minded yet feminine. He was gruff, masculine, a man's man yet appreciative of her. In "Adam's Rib," he buys her a frilly little hat. "Best hat for the best head," he says matter-of-factly.Barbara Leaming's deeply moving, astonishing new biography "Katharine Hepburn" shatters that myth decisively.
EXPLORE
July 15, 2011
Peggy Joseph Ford and John Ford, of Easton, have announced the engagement of their son, Ben Ford, to Kate Livie, of Chestertown. The bride to be is the daughter of the late Kent County Commissioner Scott Livie and Robin Bayne, of Chestertown. Livie is the granddaughter of Jeanne Livie Tarring and Hartley Bayne and the late Patricia Bayne, all of Chestertown. Kate is a graduate of Towson University and the assistant director of education at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 5, 1991
To see a film like John Ford's great "They Were Expendable" on the big screen at the Senator, where it is playing through Saturday as a tribute to Pearl Harbor, is both exhilarating and depressing.It's exhilarating to realize that once upon a time, this is what American movies were; and depressing, because this is what American movies never will be again."They Were Expendable" is probably the best of a now-vanished breed called the unit tribute. The unit it celebrates is a PT boat squadron caught in the Philippines in December 1941.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 26, 2010
John W. Ford, a retired accountant who earlier had been a career non-commissioned Army officer, died Nov. 17 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 70. The son of a drugstore owner and a homemaker, Mr. Ford was born and raised in Columbus, Ga. He was a 1958 graduate of Columbus High School. He joined the Army in 1960 where he attained the rank of chief warrant officer. Mr. Ford was assigned to the communication section of the defense attaché and worked in embassies in Bolivia, Vietnam, India, Burma, Ecuador and Switzerland.
NEWS
By Evan Haga and Evan Haga,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2008
In the decades following their 1939 releases, The Wizard of Oz and Gone With the Wind became undisputed cinema classics. Victor Fleming, who directed both pictures, became one of Hollywood's forgotten filmmaking masters. That unfortunate obscurity is what prompted Baltimore Sun film critic Michael Sragow to spend a decade writing the first definitive Fleming biography, Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master, available now from Random House. "Why write the 20th book about Hitchcock or the 50th book about John Ford or the 30th book about Brando?
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Anageles Times | November 7, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Peter Bogdanovich's rarely screened 1971 documentary Directed by John Ford has taken on almost mythic proportions over the decades. Narrated by Bogdanovich's good friend, director Orson Welles, the film featured interviews with the crusty, cantankerous Oscar-winning Ford as well as John Wayne, Henry Fonda and Jimmy Stewart, who had appeared in many of Ford's films. Directed by John Ford airs at 8 and 11:30 tonight on Turner Classic Movies.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2006
Why don't they make stars like James Cagney or John Wayne anymore? It's partly because they don't make Americans like Cagney or Wayne anymore. We've become too self-conscious - maybe even too camera-conscious - as well as too polarized and fragmented. Without even trying, these stars represented things about their country in the way they walked or smoked or set off fireworks. Cagney stood for urban American drive and sass and gumption. Wayne became a walking dream of easy Western confidence and fortitude.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 12, 2006
YOUNG MR. LINCOLN / / The Criterion Collection / $39.95 John Ford understood that democracy isn't just a form of government. It's a feeling that mingles liberty, possibility and fellowship -- and it can't be faked, no matter how hard politicians try. Ford's 1939 masterpiece Young Mr. Lincoln (due out Tuesday) portrays the Republican statesman as a small-D democrat to his bones. It's neither a biography nor a tract. It's a loving riff on Lincoln as the embodiment of the best in American character.
TRAVEL
By Brian Downes and By Brian Downes,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2000
In "Cinema Southwest," a comprehensive guide to Western movies and their locations, author John A. Murray writes: "We can imagine a Southwest without Bryce Canyon, or even without Zion, just as we can imagine a person without an arm or a leg, but a Southwest without Monument Valley is inconceivable." As mysterious as it is majestic, the harsh and desolate terrain that straddles the Arizona-Utah border some 20 miles north of Kayenta, Ariz., is -- thanks hugely to the classic Westerns of filmmaker John Ford -- the most recognizable landscape in the entire West.
NEWS
By Evan Haga and Evan Haga,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2008
In the decades following their 1939 releases, The Wizard of Oz and Gone With the Wind became undisputed cinema classics. Victor Fleming, who directed both pictures, became one of Hollywood's forgotten filmmaking masters. That unfortunate obscurity is what prompted Baltimore Sun film critic Michael Sragow to spend a decade writing the first definitive Fleming biography, Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master, available now from Random House. "Why write the 20th book about Hitchcock or the 50th book about John Ford or the 30th book about Brando?
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2006
Why don't they make stars like James Cagney or John Wayne anymore? It's partly because they don't make Americans like Cagney or Wayne anymore. We've become too self-conscious - maybe even too camera-conscious - as well as too polarized and fragmented. Without even trying, these stars represented things about their country in the way they walked or smoked or set off fireworks. Cagney stood for urban American drive and sass and gumption. Wayne became a walking dream of easy Western confidence and fortitude.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
To say John Ford directed Westerns is seriously to underplay the point.Yes, he was probably responsible for more classic Westerns than any director, everything from 1924's "The Iron Horse," the story of the first transcontinental railroad, to 1962's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence," a nod to the idea that Western myth was often more important than Western fact.Yes, he directed both 1939's "Stagecoach" and 1956's "The Searchers," films that define the Western genre. And yes, he discovered John Wayne.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to The Sun | August 27, 1995
I was browsing through the fall catalog of a mail-order house that sells movies on videocassette. Though the 123-page booklet was mostly divided up by subject matter - "Action," "Great Couples," "Family Movies" - a dozen or so famous names were given sections of their own: Clark Gable and Robert De Niro had a quarter-page each, Alfred Hitchcock a column, Audrey Hepburn a page. But only one star got two whole pages all to himself. Tom Hanks? Bogart? Fred Astaire? Nope. It was John Wayne.Sixteen years after his death, the most popular movie star of the century remains exactly what he was throughout the second half of his life: a universal symbol of what America means to itself.
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