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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1992
John Feinstein, mindful of the axiom that novelists should write what they know about, at least had a few more options than the next guy.As a reporter, he had followed college basketball, writing three non-fiction books, including "A Season On the Brink," (MacMillan, $16.95) the best-selling sports book of all time. Think about the possibilities: Bob Knight. The NCAA. Illiterate athletes. Victory-obsessed alumni.He had followed the intrigues of the professional tennis circuit, writing about players as likely to end up in the National Enquirer as the National, the now-defunct sports daily that lured Mr. Feinstein away from the Washington Post.
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SPORTS
July 8, 2011
John Feinstein has left the Navy football radio booth after 14 years as an analyst, he announced on his blog Wednesday. Feinstein wrote that he had long been trying to get made an Army-Navy football documentary based on his book "A Civil War," pitching the project to CBS Sports, among others. Then he learned last week that CBS would indeed be making a two-hour documentary on the game, to be shown in full on Showtime and in a shorter form on CBS. But they'll be doing it without Feinstein.
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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
A book review of "A March to Madness," by John Feinstein, in the Jan. 4 Perspective section incorrectly stated that the book omitted that former North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith had retired in October.The Sun regrets the error."A March to Madness: The View from the Floor in the Atlantic Coast Conference," by John Feinstein. Little, Brown and Co. 480 pages. $24.95.In college basketball, every game is a test, every loss carrying the whiff of failure. Yet John Chaney at Temple likes to say that defeat is only "a bend in the river."
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | July 8, 2011
Navy football Feinstein steps down from analyst role John Feinstein has left the Navy football radio booth after 14 years as an analyst, he announced on his blog Wednesday. Why? Well, it's sort of complicated. Feinstein wrote that he had long been trying to get made an Army-Navy football documentary based on his book "A Civil War," pitching the project to CBS Sports, among others. Then he learned last week that CBS would indeed be making a two-hour documentary on the game, to be shown in full on Showtime and in a shorter form on CBS. But they'll be doing it without Feinstein.
SPORTS
By CLARE LOCHARY and CLARE LOCHARY,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four John Feinstein Little, Brown and Company/384 pages The Super Bowl may be the king of all American sporting events, but the Final Four is a close second, certainly in terms of media coverage and revenue. Yet amid all the hype and participation of what the NCAA euphemistically calls "corporate champions," the event somehow remains engaging and even a little wholesome. Few can resist the meritocratic single-elimination tournament structure or the emergence of a Cinderella team.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE THE CANDIDATE'S WIFE. Patricia O'Brien. Simon & Schuster. 347 pages. $21 | April 19, 1992
RUNNING MATES.John Feinstein.Villard.238 pages. $19. Reporter Bobby Kelleher, who covers Annapolis for the Washington Herald, has spent six years dreaming of The Big Hit -- the stop-the-presses story of a lifetime. When the governor of Maryland, Barney Paulsen, is assassinated, Kelleher knows that his big chance has arrived.In the search for likely suspects, Kelleher learns that a former Ku Klux Klan grand dragon named Jimmy Dumont was sitting in the front row of the House gallery when Paulsen was shot.
SPORTS
July 8, 2011
John Feinstein has left the Navy football radio booth after 14 years as an analyst, he announced on his blog Wednesday. Feinstein wrote that he had long been trying to get made an Army-Navy football documentary based on his book "A Civil War," pitching the project to CBS Sports, among others. Then he learned last week that CBS would indeed be making a two-hour documentary on the game, to be shown in full on Showtime and in a shorter form on CBS. But they'll be doing it without Feinstein.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
Next Man Up: A Year behind the Lines in Today's NFL John Feinstein Little Brown / 502 pages Baltimore Colts fans liked to say the former Memorial Stadium was "the world's largest outdoor insane asylum." M&T Bank Stadium, home of the Baltimore Ravens, might best be described then as the asylum let out for Mardi Gras. Decked out in grape feather boas, masks and beads, the crowd at Ravens games is festive, feisty and profane. Every time an opponent's name is announced, the raucous fans chant that he "sucks."
NEWS
By George Grella | April 4, 1993
PLAY BALL: THE LIFE AND TROUBLED TIMES OF MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL. John Feinstein. Villard.425 pages. $22.50. As all the hand-wringers tell us and even a lukewarm fan -- if there is such a being -- must know, baseball is undergoing some serious problems, most of them connected to finances. Club owners routinely extort huge amounts of money from municipalities in exchange for keeping teams in their home cities; some teams can no longer afford to pay the large salaries that some stars expect, thus turning the leagues into the haves and the have-nots; the lucrative television contracts result in World Series games being played too late for children to watch them.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
THE BLACK LIZARD BIG BOOK OF PULPS Edited by Otto Penzler Vintage / 1,200 pages / $25 For the pulp magazine enthusiast: For those who dearly miss Black Mask and Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine and yearn for Hard Case Crime to up their release schedule from one paperback a month, this will provide you with many, many hours of perusing. Otto Penzler has assembled a more than generous helping of pulp goodness ranging from a previously unpublished Dashiell Hammett story, two novels by early masters Carroll John Daly and Frederick Nabel and over 40 additional tales by the likes of James M. Cain, Erle Stanley Gardner, Cornel Woolrich and Raymond Chandler, to formerly forgotten scribes Eric Taylor, Paul Cain and Steve Fisher (to name a few)
NEWS
December 9, 2007
THE BLACK LIZARD BIG BOOK OF PULPS Edited by Otto Penzler Vintage / 1,200 pages / $25 For the pulp magazine enthusiast: For those who dearly miss Black Mask and Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine and yearn for Hard Case Crime to up their release schedule from one paperback a month, this will provide you with many, many hours of perusing. Otto Penzler has assembled a more than generous helping of pulp goodness ranging from a previously unpublished Dashiell Hammett story, two novels by early masters Carroll John Daly and Frederick Nabel and over 40 additional tales by the likes of James M. Cain, Erle Stanley Gardner, Cornel Woolrich and Raymond Chandler, to formerly forgotten scribes Eric Taylor, Paul Cain and Steve Fisher (to name a few)
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | August 25, 2006
The U.S. Open begins Monday, with the usual extensive coverage on USA Network and CBS, and as enjoyable as the telecasts are for tennis fans, each year's edition seems to bring with it the same question. Can tennis be fixed? Earlier this week, while appearing on WJFK (1300 AM), prolific sports author John Feinstein - whose books include one on pro tennis - said: "Tennis is dead." During a conference call Wednesday, USA and CBS commentators Tracy Austin, Mary Carillo and John McEnroe spent a chunk of their time going over the well-worn topics of how the sport's structure undermines its well-being.
SPORTS
By CLARE LOCHARY and CLARE LOCHARY,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four John Feinstein Little, Brown and Company/384 pages The Super Bowl may be the king of all American sporting events, but the Final Four is a close second, certainly in terms of media coverage and revenue. Yet amid all the hype and participation of what the NCAA euphemistically calls "corporate champions," the event somehow remains engaging and even a little wholesome. Few can resist the meritocratic single-elimination tournament structure or the emergence of a Cinderella team.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
Next Man Up: A Year behind the Lines in Today's NFL John Feinstein Little Brown / 502 pages Baltimore Colts fans liked to say the former Memorial Stadium was "the world's largest outdoor insane asylum." M&T Bank Stadium, home of the Baltimore Ravens, might best be described then as the asylum let out for Mardi Gras. Decked out in grape feather boas, masks and beads, the crowd at Ravens games is festive, feisty and profane. Every time an opponent's name is announced, the raucous fans chant that he "sucks."
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
A book review of "A March to Madness," by John Feinstein, in the Jan. 4 Perspective section incorrectly stated that the book omitted that former North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith had retired in October.The Sun regrets the error."A March to Madness: The View from the Floor in the Atlantic Coast Conference," by John Feinstein. Little, Brown and Co. 480 pages. $24.95.In college basketball, every game is a test, every loss carrying the whiff of failure. Yet John Chaney at Temple likes to say that defeat is only "a bend in the river."
NEWS
By George Grella | April 4, 1993
PLAY BALL: THE LIFE AND TROUBLED TIMES OF MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL. John Feinstein. Villard.425 pages. $22.50. As all the hand-wringers tell us and even a lukewarm fan -- if there is such a being -- must know, baseball is undergoing some serious problems, most of them connected to finances. Club owners routinely extort huge amounts of money from municipalities in exchange for keeping teams in their home cities; some teams can no longer afford to pay the large salaries that some stars expect, thus turning the leagues into the haves and the have-nots; the lucrative television contracts result in World Series games being played too late for children to watch them.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | July 8, 2011
Navy football Feinstein steps down from analyst role John Feinstein has left the Navy football radio booth after 14 years as an analyst, he announced on his blog Wednesday. Why? Well, it's sort of complicated. Feinstein wrote that he had long been trying to get made an Army-Navy football documentary based on his book "A Civil War," pitching the project to CBS Sports, among others. Then he learned last week that CBS would indeed be making a two-hour documentary on the game, to be shown in full on Showtime and in a shorter form on CBS. But they'll be doing it without Feinstein.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | August 25, 2006
The U.S. Open begins Monday, with the usual extensive coverage on USA Network and CBS, and as enjoyable as the telecasts are for tennis fans, each year's edition seems to bring with it the same question. Can tennis be fixed? Earlier this week, while appearing on WJFK (1300 AM), prolific sports author John Feinstein - whose books include one on pro tennis - said: "Tennis is dead." During a conference call Wednesday, USA and CBS commentators Tracy Austin, Mary Carillo and John McEnroe spent a chunk of their time going over the well-worn topics of how the sport's structure undermines its well-being.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE THE CANDIDATE'S WIFE. Patricia O'Brien. Simon & Schuster. 347 pages. $21 | April 19, 1992
RUNNING MATES.John Feinstein.Villard.238 pages. $19. Reporter Bobby Kelleher, who covers Annapolis for the Washington Herald, has spent six years dreaming of The Big Hit -- the stop-the-presses story of a lifetime. When the governor of Maryland, Barney Paulsen, is assassinated, Kelleher knows that his big chance has arrived.In the search for likely suspects, Kelleher learns that a former Ku Klux Klan grand dragon named Jimmy Dumont was sitting in the front row of the House gallery when Paulsen was shot.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1992
John Feinstein, mindful of the axiom that novelists should write what they know about, at least had a few more options than the next guy.As a reporter, he had followed college basketball, writing three non-fiction books, including "A Season On the Brink," (MacMillan, $16.95) the best-selling sports book of all time. Think about the possibilities: Bob Knight. The NCAA. Illiterate athletes. Victory-obsessed alumni.He had followed the intrigues of the professional tennis circuit, writing about players as likely to end up in the National Enquirer as the National, the now-defunct sports daily that lured Mr. Feinstein away from the Washington Post.
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