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John Erickson

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BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
John Erickson made his fortune building resort-like retirement communities for the aging, in part by promoting the properties through a publication that looked like a newspaper, but with no pretense that it was journalism. He mailed the publication to potential residents of his Erickson Retirement Communities - people over age 50 in major cities where he had built or planned to construct one of his large campuses. The Erickson Tribune included stories and tidbits on all the services offered at his communities, which boast their own health care system, restaurants and man-made lakes.
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SPORTS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Helio Castroneves had just climbed out of a cracked-up car, but it was hard to tell by looking at him. "It isn't very often that it happens," said Castroneves, standing in front of a dozen or more crew members working to switch out his damaged car for a back-up. "We feel very lucky. " All shined up and smiling, the "Dancing With the Stars" champion was telling a group of sponsors and their families about how the steering wheels in Indy cars work, when someone asked him about the morning practice crash.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | August 5, 1991
John Erickson knows how to work a room.Before he tells luncheon guests at the Charlestown Retirement Community about the fully-refundable entry deposit, the three levels of nursing care and the luxury apartments that are still available, he makes friends with them."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2011
The founder of the Catonsville-based retirement community company that pioneered campus-style continuing-care facilities nationwide faces a $100 million lawsuit brought on by a trustee this month. John C. Erickson, who founded the Baltimore County Erickson Retirement Communities in 1983, is accused, along with his family members and other former board members, of approving company assets for private use. The company has since been bought by a local entrepreneur and operates under new leadership as Erickson Living.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 21, 2009
If any business proposition ever looked like a sure thing, betting on aging Americans, rising home values and the advantages of tax-exempt companies might have been it. For a quarter-century it paid off for John C. Erickson, who built the retirement-home chain bearing his name into a billion-dollar operation that spread from Massachusetts to Texas. Along the way he acquired a yacht and multimillion-dollar homes and started a charitable foundation that had $139 million in assets in 2007, the most recent year information is available.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Andrea Walker and Lorraine Mirabella and Andrea Walker,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com and Andrea.Walker@baltsun.com | October 20, 2009
Erickson Retirement Communities, a pioneering senior-living developer founded 26 years ago with the opening of Charlestown in Catonsville, filed for federal bankruptcy-law protection Monday with a plan to restructure more than $1 billion in debt and sell the struggling company to a local investment firm. Erickson said the Chapter 11 filing was necessary to restructure debt, split the core management and real estate businesses into separate entities, and pave the way for a sale. Erickson, which has 23,000 residents in communities around the U.S., said it was being purchased for an undisclosed amount by Redwood Capital Investments LLC. That company is controlled by Jim Davis, who is the majority owner of the $5 billion, Hanover-based staffing firm Allegis Group; he could not be reached for comment Monday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 12, 2004
A nonprofit group is converting a former convent in Canton into housing for critically ill children from around the world who come to Baltimore for bone marrow transplants. A groundbreaking ceremony is slated for today at the Children's House at St. Casimir, at 2712 O'Donnell St. The Believe in Tomorrow National Children's Foundation is spearheading the $900,000 project, which will provide accommodations for pediatric patients and their families. The facility will include apartments, a rooftop deck and a "healing garden."
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Helio Castroneves had just climbed out of a cracked-up car, but it was hard to tell by looking at him. "It isn't very often that it happens," said Castroneves, standing in front of a dozen or more crew members working to switch out his damaged car for a back-up. "We feel very lucky. " All shined up and smiling, the "Dancing With the Stars" champion was telling a group of sponsors and their families about how the steering wheels in Indy cars work, when someone asked him about the morning practice crash.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
With what was once primarily a commuter school rapidly turning into a residential campus, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County needed more dormitory space quickly.In stepped John C. Erickson, developer of the Charlestown and Oak Crest retirement communities, with an unusual proposal that will provide the school with 250 new dormitory beds by next fall.Under a plan approved by the state Board of Public Works last week, the $14 million building -- which eventually will house 500 students -- will be built by the Erickson Foundation, with the foundation receiving the money students pay to rent the rooms.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | September 7, 1991
Towson State basketball coach Terry Truax said last night that he will inform athletic director Bill Hunter Monday that he is staying at the school if the Southwest Conference does not arrive at a decision this weekend on whom it will name as the league's assistant commissioner/director of basketball operations.Truax, 46, is still one of two finalists for the job after being interviewed for 1 1/2 hours in Dallas Wednesday by a five-man SWC advisory committee that is helping SWC commissioner Fred Jacoby fill the newly created position.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 21, 2009
If any business proposition ever looked like a sure thing, betting on aging Americans, rising home values and the advantages of tax-exempt companies might have been it. For a quarter-century it paid off for John C. Erickson, who built the retirement-home chain bearing his name into a billion-dollar operation that spread from Massachusetts to Texas. Along the way he acquired a yacht and multimillion-dollar homes and started a charitable foundation that had $139 million in assets in 2007, the most recent year information is available.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Andrea Walker and Lorraine Mirabella and Andrea Walker,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com and Andrea.Walker@baltsun.com | October 20, 2009
Erickson Retirement Communities, a pioneering senior-living developer founded 26 years ago with the opening of Charlestown in Catonsville, filed for federal bankruptcy-law protection Monday with a plan to restructure more than $1 billion in debt and sell the struggling company to a local investment firm. Erickson said the Chapter 11 filing was necessary to restructure debt, split the core management and real estate businesses into separate entities, and pave the way for a sale. Erickson, which has 23,000 residents in communities around the U.S., said it was being purchased for an undisclosed amount by Redwood Capital Investments LLC. That company is controlled by Jim Davis, who is the majority owner of the $5 billion, Hanover-based staffing firm Allegis Group; he could not be reached for comment Monday.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
A man who built an empire on the idea of living large in retirement is having to scale back a bit himself. John Erickson, whose Erickson Retirement Communities operates 19 communities in 11 states, will try to unload his Inner Harbor corporate penthouse in an auction Saturday. Bids for Harborview's Penthouse 4A begin at $950,000. List price for the 3BR, 3.5BA, 3,922-square-foot waterfront condo was $4.6 million when Erickson first put it up for sale a year ago. "The goal of the sale is to support Erickson's ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance liquidity," said Mel Tansill, an Erickson spokesman.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
Imagine an elderly patient arriving at a hospital emergency room with a stroke, says John Erickson, chairman and chief executive of Erickson Retirement Communities. A "clot-buster" drug, administered in the first few hours, can improve the patient's chances. Definitely. Unless that patient has been taking blood thinners, has had very recent surgery or has a history of brain bleeding - in which case the drug could cause life-threatening hemorrhaging. How is the doctor to know - quickly - the patient's medication schedule, recent surgical treatments and medical history?
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
John Erickson made his fortune building resort-like retirement communities for the aging, in part by promoting the properties through a publication that looked like a newspaper, but with no pretense that it was journalism. He mailed the publication to potential residents of his Erickson Retirement Communities - people over age 50 in major cities where he had built or planned to construct one of his large campuses. The Erickson Tribune included stories and tidbits on all the services offered at his communities, which boast their own health care system, restaurants and man-made lakes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 12, 2004
A nonprofit group is converting a former convent in Canton into housing for critically ill children from around the world who come to Baltimore for bone marrow transplants. A groundbreaking ceremony is slated for today at the Children's House at St. Casimir, at 2712 O'Donnell St. The Believe in Tomorrow National Children's Foundation is spearheading the $900,000 project, which will provide accommodations for pediatric patients and their families. The facility will include apartments, a rooftop deck and a "healing garden."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
A man who built an empire on the idea of living large in retirement is having to scale back a bit himself. John Erickson, whose Erickson Retirement Communities operates 19 communities in 11 states, will try to unload his Inner Harbor corporate penthouse in an auction Saturday. Bids for Harborview's Penthouse 4A begin at $950,000. List price for the 3BR, 3.5BA, 3,922-square-foot waterfront condo was $4.6 million when Erickson first put it up for sale a year ago. "The goal of the sale is to support Erickson's ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance liquidity," said Mel Tansill, an Erickson spokesman.
SPORTS
August 24, 1991
Towson's Truax a finalist for SWC jobTowson State basketball coach Terry Truax is one of two finalists for the newly created position of Southwest Conference director of basketball operations, said members of an SWC advisory committee that is in the process of filling the job.Assistant SWC information director Bob Gennarelli said last night: "The advisory committee has said that Terry Truax and John Erickson [former basketball coach at Wisconsin and the...
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
With what was once primarily a commuter school rapidly turning into a residential campus, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County needed more dormitory space quickly.In stepped John C. Erickson, developer of the Charlestown and Oak Crest retirement communities, with an unusual proposal that will provide the school with 250 new dormitory beds by next fall.Under a plan approved by the state Board of Public Works last week, the $14 million building -- which eventually will house 500 students -- will be built by the Erickson Foundation, with the foundation receiving the money students pay to rent the rooms.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | September 7, 1991
Towson State basketball coach Terry Truax said last night that he will inform athletic director Bill Hunter Monday that he is staying at the school if the Southwest Conference does not arrive at a decision this weekend on whom it will name as the league's assistant commissioner/director of basketball operations.Truax, 46, is still one of two finalists for the job after being interviewed for 1 1/2 hours in Dallas Wednesday by a five-man SWC advisory committee that is helping SWC commissioner Fred Jacoby fill the newly created position.
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