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John Eager Howard

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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
From Orphans' Court judge to governor, U.S. senator to city commissioner, no public service job was too big or too small for John Eager Howard, the Revolutionary War colonel for whom Howard County was named. Born to a wealthy Baltimore County family in 1752, he made his name in the American Revolution, gaining recognition for military prowess and courage. "He belonged to a generation of Marylanders who served the Revolution well," said Maryland State Archivist Edward C. Papenfuse. In the 1781 Battle of Cowpens, Howard, then a lieutenant colonel, was "credited with turning the apparent British triumph into an American victory" in South Carolina, according to "John Eager Howard: Patriot and Public Servant," a Maryland Historical Magazine article by Cary Howard.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
Several weeks ago, I had written about vice presidential candidates who hailed from Maryland. Along with intrepid Sun researcher Paul McCardell, who has a deep and abiding affection and thorough working knowledge of Maryland history, we came up with two names and an almost was. Henry Gassaway Davis was the oldest vice presidential candidate when he ran with Democratic nominee Alton B. Parker in 1904. He was 80 at the time. Forty years ago, Spiro T. Agnew, former Baltimore County executive and Maryland governor, was nominated to be Richard M. Nixon's running mate at the Republican Convention at the Miami Beach Convention Center in Florida.
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NEWS
April 10, 1996
An editorial in yesterday's editions misidentified Homewood as the home of Col. John Eager Howard. In fact, Colonel Howard's mansion was known as Belvedere and was located near today's Belvedere Hotel. It was built over a period of eight years (1786-1794) and was demolished in 1875-1876 when Calvert Street was extended north.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
From Orphans' Court judge to governor, U.S. senator to city commissioner, no public service job was too big or too small for John Eager Howard, the Revolutionary War colonel for whom Howard County was named. Born to a wealthy Baltimore County family in 1752, he made his name in the American Revolution, gaining recognition for military prowess and courage. "He belonged to a generation of Marylanders who served the Revolution well," said Maryland State Archivist Edward C. Papenfuse. In the 1781 Battle of Cowpens, Howard, then a lieutenant colonel, was "credited with turning the apparent British triumph into an American victory" in South Carolina, according to "John Eager Howard: Patriot and Public Servant," a Maryland Historical Magazine article by Cary Howard.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
THE QUESTION: HOW DID HOWARD COUNTY GET ITS NAME? The county was first designated the Howard District in 1839, when it was part of Anne Arundel County, according to the county's Web site. It is named after John Eager Howard, who was a statesman, soldier and the state's fifth governor. In 1851, Howard County became the 21st county in the state. Send a question of general interest to: howard.question@baltsun.com Include your name, address and telephone number if you would like to have the question acknowledged in print.
NEWS
April 9, 1996
An editorial in yesterday's editions misidentified Homewood as the home of Col. John Eager Howard. In fact, Colonel Howard's mansion was known as Belvedere and was located near today's Belvedere Hotel. It was built over a period of eight years (1786-1794) and was demolished in 1875-1876 when Calvert Street was extended north.The Sun regrets the errors.WHILE IT IS commonly known that Baltimore City once was part of Baltimore County, it is not often remembered that before Howard County was established in 1851, it was part of Anne Arundel County, then Baltimore County and later part of Arundel again.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
1781: Lt. Col. Howard in battle Jan. 17 marks the anniversary of the Battle of Cowpens in 1781, a major engagement of the Revolutionary War in South Carolina that included important participation by John Eager Howard, the namesake of Howard County. At the time, Howard was a lieutenant colonel under Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan, who commanded the American troops at a pasture area for cattle known as the Cowpens. "[Howard's attack] was done with such address that the enemy fled with the utmost precipitation.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
The Owl Bar and the John Eager Howard Room, two midtown nightspots where generations of Baltimoreans have wined and dined, might reopen by spring if a Baltimore restaurateur is successful in obtaining financing and a liquor license for his proposed operation.Dion M. Dorizas, a Greek native who has been a partner in the old Cafe des Artistes restaurant in Hopkins Place and the Cafe Martinique operations on Calvert Street and at Perring Plaza, heads a group that is negotiating to buy the Owl Bar, the John Eager Howard and the 13th Floor bar inside the former Belvedere Hotel -- the Mount Vernon landmark that is being converted to condominiums.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
Less than a year after Baltimore businessman Dion Dorizas reopened the Owl Bar and the 13th-floor lounge at the Belvedere Grand Condominiums in midtown Baltimore, the well-known nightspots are headed for the auction block.Alex Cooper Auctioneers has set April 15 for an auction for the restaurant and bar, located in the 13-story building at 1 E. Chase St.At the auction, scheduled to start at 10 a.m., Cooper also plans to sell the former John Eager Howard Room, now a nightclub called the Club Renaissance, and related fixtures and equipment.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | August 14, 1994
Baltimoreans gave a collective moan of despair when a pair of well-loved dining institutions changed drastically and then closed down earlier this year. But it's time for a collective sigh of relief: The John Eager Howard Room and the Owl Bar in the Belvedere Hotel are on the verge of getting new management, and the partners hope to restore both spots to their former glory.Chef-owner Paul Santi has closed Champagne Tony's, his 2-year-old spot in Federal Hill, and plans to move it to the Howard room.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
1781: Lt. Col. Howard in battle Jan. 17 marks the anniversary of the Battle of Cowpens in 1781, a major engagement of the Revolutionary War in South Carolina that included important participation by John Eager Howard, the namesake of Howard County. At the time, Howard was a lieutenant colonel under Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan, who commanded the American troops at a pasture area for cattle known as the Cowpens. "[Howard's attack] was done with such address that the enemy fled with the utmost precipitation.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
THE QUESTION: HOW DID HOWARD COUNTY GET ITS NAME? The county was first designated the Howard District in 1839, when it was part of Anne Arundel County, according to the county's Web site. It is named after John Eager Howard, who was a statesman, soldier and the state's fifth governor. In 1851, Howard County became the 21st county in the state. Send a question of general interest to: howard.question@baltsun.com Include your name, address and telephone number if you would like to have the question acknowledged in print.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
WHEN YOU see Sandra Ashe in action, you get the answer to the question: What makes a good school? It's the principal, stupid. Ashe began her second year yesterday as principal of Rosemont Elementary in West Baltimore, the only neighborhood public school in Maryland (and possibly in the United States) operated by a state college. Ashe was recruited by Coppin State President Calvin W. Burnett and other Coppin officials after three years of false starts and wrong turns in the great experiment.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
News reports this week describing Baltimore's once elegant Stafford Hotel, now a low-income housing project, as a center of prostitution and drug dealing are a far cry from those that greeted the hotel's opening in 1894. "This latest addition to Baltimore's hotels is a twelve-story brick and stone building, occupying a commanding position on Washington Place, near Madison Street," reported The Sun. "The main entrance leads to a tiled hallway decorated in Romanesque designs. Soft mono-tints of the walls and ceilings are relieved with friezes and borders in conventional patterns flecked with gold," said the newspaper.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2000
Sometimes, it seemed like the long, slow trek to the county seat of Annapolis would never end, what with traffic moving at the proverbial snail's pace -- but what could you expect in the 1830s? Unlike now, when travelers seek wider highways and faster vehicles but are still sometimes stuck in stalled traffic, Howard residents from the early 19th century had a different solution. They split Howard free from Anne Arundel County, built their own courthouse in Ellicott City and moved their destination closer to home.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1998
Natalie Nicole Manuel had a special way with children, an easy, childlike manner that relaxed even the youngest of the young. To them, she was a confidante.Miss Manuel, 19, who had cancer, was a regular at the Children's Cancer Clinic of the University of Maryland Medical Center, routinely visiting and comforting anxious youngsters.She also befriended children outside the hospital and volunteered several times a week to teach a dance class to girls at the John Eager Howard recreation center in Reservoir Hill.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
WHEN YOU see Sandra Ashe in action, you get the answer to the question: What makes a good school? It's the principal, stupid. Ashe began her second year yesterday as principal of Rosemont Elementary in West Baltimore, the only neighborhood public school in Maryland (and possibly in the United States) operated by a state college. Ashe was recruited by Coppin State President Calvin W. Burnett and other Coppin officials after three years of false starts and wrong turns in the great experiment.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1998
Natalie Nicole Manuel had a special way with children, an easy, childlike manner that relaxed even the youngest of the young. To them, she was a confidante.Miss Manuel, 19, who had cancer, was a regular at the Children's Cancer Clinic of the University of Maryland Medical Center, routinely visiting and comforting anxious youngsters.She also befriended children outside the hospital and volunteered several times a week to teach a dance class to girls at the John Eager Howard recreation center in Reservoir Hill.
NEWS
By Ed Lee and Ed Lee,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
The Howard County Council will hold a public hearing tonight on a Baltimore company's plan to build an 80-unit senior apartment complex in Ellicott City.The meeting -- scheduled for 8 p.m. in the County Council chambers -- will consider the request of Shelter Properties Corp., which operates two senior homes in Howard County, to build an 80-unit, four-story complex on 4 acres off Ridge Road next to the post office.The complex -- to be called Parkview at Ellicott City -- would have elevators, a multipurpose community room and emergency pull cords in the bedroom and bathroom of each unit.
NEWS
April 10, 1996
An editorial in yesterday's editions misidentified Homewood as the home of Col. John Eager Howard. In fact, Colonel Howard's mansion was known as Belvedere and was located near today's Belvedere Hotel. It was built over a period of eight years (1786-1794) and was demolished in 1875-1876 when Calvert Street was extended north.The Sun regrets the errors.
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